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Archive for the ‘Japan’ Category

Monday September 17, 2012           9:35am EDT

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta expressed concern on Monday about mounting tensions between Beijing and Tokyo over a disputed island group, urging “calm and restraint on all sides” as anti-Japanese protests flared in China for another day.

“It is in everybody’s interest – it is in everybody’s interest – for Japan and China to maintain good relations and to find a way to avoid further escalation,” Panetta told a news conference after meetings with the Japanese foreign and defense ministers.

Panetta’s remarks came during a weeklong trip to Asia that includes stops in Beijing and Qingdao, home of the Chinese navy’s North Sea fleet.

The U.S. defense secretary, who arrived in China late on Monday, will meet with Chinese Defense Minister Liang Guanglie and Vice President Xi Jinping, who is due to take over as president next spring.

Panetta’s visit is aimed at developing a closer military relationship with China while also working to deepen U.S. defense ties with its longtime treaty allies as part of a shift in U.S. strategic focus to the Asia-Pacific region.

As part of that effort, Panetta and Japanese Defense Minister Satoshi Morimoto announced on Monday the two countries have agreed to locate a second missile defense radar system on Japanese territory to protect against a growing North Korean ballistic missile threat.

“(The radar) will enhance the alliance’s ability to defend Japan, our forward deployed forces and the U.S. homeland from a ballistic missile threat posed by North Korea,” Panetta said.

An X-band missile defense radar is already in place at the Shariki base in Japan, and many U.S. warships are equipped with the radar as part of the Aegis weapons system. But the two countries agreed to begin evaluating sites for a second land-based system.

“More is better,” a U.S. defense official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said in explaining the decision.

“This deployment will be a force multiplier for the United States and our allies,” the official added, saying it would enable the United States to spread out its ships to better track the missile threat.

The official insisted the system was not aimed at China, but rather was “focused on addressing the growing North Korean missile threat” to the United States and its allies.

The missile defense issue illustrates the balancing act Panetta faces during his visit to the Asia-Pacific region.

He is working to build up the military capabilities of U.S. allies as part of the U.S. strategic shift while trying to reassure Beijing that Washington does not aim to thwart China’s emergence as a global power.

On the islands dispute, Panetta said Washington stood by its mutual defense obligations under the U.S.-Japan security treaty, but he also pressed for Japan and China to take constructive steps to resolve the dispute peacefully.

China and Japan both claim the islands, called Senkaku by Tokyo and Diaoyu by China, which are located in waters thought to be rich in natural gas.

The protests across China were triggered by a Japanese government decision last week to purchase the islands from a private Japanese owner. Beijing warned that the Japanese move was a provocative violation of its sovereignty.

“Obviously we’re concerned by the demonstrations (in China) and we’re concerned by the conflict that is taking place over the Senkaku islands, and the message that I have tried to convey is a message that we have to urge calm and restraint on all sides,” Panetta told reporters.

from:  http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/09/17/us-china-japan-treaty-idUSBRE88G0T020120917

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Yoshihiko Noda was born on May 20th, 1957 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoshihiko_Noda

May 20th, 1957

5 + 20 +1+9+5+7 = 47 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Famous. Name & fame. Notoriety. Name recognition. (Inter)nationally known. High profile. VIP. Well-known. Household name. Public life. Limelight. Notable. Noteworthy. Eminent. Prominent. Legacy. The future. Tomorrow. Foresight. Visionary. Candidate.

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May 20th, 1957

May 20th

5 + 20 +2+0+1+2 = 30 = his personal year (from May 20th, 2012 to May 19th, 2013) = Quality of life.  Fundamentally unsatisfied.

Four of Wands Tarot card

30 year +  (September) = 39 = his personal month (from September 20th, 2012 to October 19th, 2012) = Offers.  Proposals.  If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Yoshihiko Noda

761898926 5641                72

 

his path of destiny = 72 = Holding firm.  The status quo.  Financially conservative.

Four of Pentacles Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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http://electionnumerology.com/

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A participant holds a ventriloquial dummy wearing anti-nuclear signs at a rally protesting against the usage of nuclear energy in Tokyo on Saturday.

May 5, 2012          6:07 AM ET

Thousands of Japanese marched to celebrate the switching off of the last of their nation’s 50 nuclear reactors Saturday, waving banners shaped as giant fish that have become a potent anti-nuclear symbol.

Japan was without electricity from nuclear power for the first time in four decades when the reactor at Tomari nuclear plant on the northern island of Hokkaido went offline for mandatory routine maintenance.

After last year’s March 11 quake and tsunami set off meltdowns at the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, no reactor halted for checkups has been restarted amid public worries about the safety of nuclear technology.

“Today is a historic day,” Masashi Ishikawa shouted to a crowd gathered at a Tokyo park, some holding traditional “koinobori” carp-shaped banners for Children’s Day that have become a symbol of the anti-nuclear movement.

Japan will be free of atomic power when the Tomari No. 3 reactor is switched off for regular inspections.

Japan will be free of atomic power when the Tomari No. 3 reactor is switched off for regular inspections.

“There are so many nuclear plants, but not a single one will be up and running today, and that’s because of our efforts,” Ishikawa said.

The activists said it is fitting that the day Japan stopped nuclear power coincides with Children’s Day because of their concerns about protecting children from radiation, which Fukushima Dai-ichi is still spewing into the air and water.

The government has been eager to restart nuclear reactors, warning about blackouts and rising carbon emissions as Japan is forced to turn to oil and gas for energy.

Japan now requires reactors to pass new tests to withstand quakes and tsunami and to gain local residents’ approval before restarting.

The response from people living near nuclear plants has been mixed, with some wanting them back in operation because of jobs, subsidies and other benefits to the local economy.

Power shortage possible

Major protests, like the one Saturday, have been generally limited to urban areas like Tokyo, which had received electricity from faraway nuclear plants, including Fukushima Dai-ichi.

Before the nuclear crisis, Japan relied on nuclear power for a third of its electricity.

The crowd at the anti-nuclear rally, estimated at 5,500 by organizers, shrugged off government warnings about a power shortage. If anything, they said, with the reactors going offline one by one, it was clear the nation didn’t really need nuclear power.

‘There are so many nuclear plants, but not a single one will be up and running today, and that’s because of our efforts.’—Anti-nuclear power protester Masashi Ishikawa

Whether Japan will suffer a sharp power crunch is still unclear.

Electricity shortages are expected only at peak periods, such as the middle of the day in hot weather, and critics of nuclear power say proponents are exaggerating the consequences to win public approval to restart reactors.

Hokkaido Electric Power Co. spokesman Hisatoshi Kibayashi said the shutdown was completed late Saturday.

The Hokkaido Tomari plant has three reactors, but the other two had been halted earlier. Before March 11 last year, the nation had 54 nuclear reactors, but four of the six reactors at Fukushima Dai-ichi are being decommissioned because of the disaster.

Yoko Kataoka, a retired baker who was dancing to the music at the rally waving a small paper carp, said she was happy the reactor was being turned off.

“Let’s leave an Earth where our children and grandchildren can all play without worries,” she said, wearing a shirt that had, “No thank you, nukes,” handwritten on the back.

from:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/05/05/japan-nuclear-power-shut-off.html

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Saturday May 5th, 2012

May 5th, 2012

5 + 5 +2+0+1+2 = 15 = the day Japan stopped nuclear power and 2012 Children’s Day’s life lesson and personal year = Externalities.

15 year + 5 (May) = 20 = the day Japan stopped nuclear power and 2012 Children’s Day’s personal month (from May 5th, 2012 to June 4th, 2012) = Turning point.  You be the judge.  Judge for yourself.

Judgement Tarot card

20 month + 5 (5th of the month on Saturday May 5th, 2012) = 25 = the day Japan stopped nuclear power and 2012 Children’s Day’s personal day = Activists.  Advocates.  Movements.

Knight of Wands Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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you can try to figure out some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

Read Full Post »

File:Yoshihiko Noda-3.jpg

December 16, 2011

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda of Japan has declared an end to the world’s worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl, saying technicians have regained control of reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

“Today, we have reached a great milestone,” Mr. Noda said in a televised address to the nation. “The reactors are stable, which should resolve one big cause of concern for us all.”

The declaration — which comes nine months after a calamitous earthquake and tsunami destroyed the seaside plant, triggering a huge radiation leak — could set the stage for the return of some evacuees to affected areas.

The government will now focus on removing the fuel stored at the site, opening up the ravaged reactors themselves and eventually dismantling the plant, a process that is expected to take at least four decades, Mr. Noda said.

But for many of the people of Fukushima, the crisis is far from over. More than 160,000 people remain displaced, and even as the government lifts evacuation orders for some communities, many are refusing to return home.

“This does not ring true for us at all,” said Hirofumi Onuma, 52, deputy principal of a high school in Minamisoma, which was evacuated after the disaster. After a desperate clean-up effort, the school was declared safe and reopened at the end of October. Still, only 350 of 705 students have returned.

“The plant is like a black box, and we don’t know what is really happening,” Mr. Onuma said. “I feel no relief.”

The nuclear crisis led to soul searching in a nation already worn down by two lost decades of economic growth, a rapidly aging and now shrinking population, and political catharsis.

Blame for the accident has been laid on a confluence of many factors: a once-in-a-millennium tsunami, a site vulnerable to seismic disasters, a response that fell short and cozy ties between nuclear operators and those tasked to oversee them.

Many experts still doubt the government’s assertion that the plant is now in a stable state and worry that officials are declaring victory only to quell public anger over the accident.

The announcement on Friday of the equivalent of a “cold shutdown,” a technical term that means a reactor’s cooling system operates below 200 degrees Fahrenheit, assumes that the reactors are intact, said Hiroaki Koide, assistant professor at the Research Reactor Institute at Kyoto University and a prominent nuclear critic.

The plant’s operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, has acknowledged that the uranium fuel in three reactors has likely melted through their containments. Some experts, including Mr. Koide, suspect the fuel could be threatening groundwater.

Experts have also expressed concern over signs of sporadic “recriticality” of the fuel, a phenomenon in which nuclear fission resumes in melted nuclear fuel lying on the floor of a storage pool or reactor core. Tokyo Electric, however, has said any fission is not likely to be self-sustaining. The plant continues to leak radiation. And water used to cool the reactors is still building up at the plant, forcing officials to consider releasing contaminated water into the ocean.

“There is absolutely no cold shutdown,” Mr. Koide said. “It is a term that has been trotted out to give the impression we are reaching some sort of closure.”

“We still face a long battle of epic proportions, and by the time it is really over, most of us will be long dead,” he added.

But Goshi Hosono, minister of state for nuclear power policy, said that recovery work at the plant had progressed enough that any further debacles could be averted.

“We may still face various troubles, but the plant is now stable enough to overcome them,” he said.

The unfolding destruction at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, 160 miles north of Tokyo, has become etched in Japan’s psyche.

The earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan’s northeastern coast knocked out vital cooling systems at the site, causing the cores of three reactors and the spent fuel at a fourth to overheat. Hydrogen explosions eventually blew the tops off three reactor buildings.

Mr. Noda paid tribute to what he called the heroic effort of workers who risked their lives to bring the plant under control.

“I speak for the nation in giving thanks for the heroic and self-sacrificing acts that saved Japan from this nuclear disaster,” he said.

The severity of the disaster has led to movement against nuclear power in Japan. On Sept. 19, an estimated 60,000 people marched in central Tokyo to urge the Japanese government to abandon nuclear power, and smaller protests have followed.

Only eight of the nation’s 54 reactors are operating, as local communities resist the restarting of reactors closed for maintenance or inspection since the March disaster. Mr. Noda has pushed for a swift restart of reactors that pass government-mandated stress tests, however. The government has also moved toward restarting exports of nuclear technology.

Then there is the aftermath. Mr. Noda said that a cleanup of radiation, protecting public health and compensating victims of the nuclear disaster were now the government’s priorities. He said he would set aside more than 1 trillion yen — nearly $13 billion — to pay to decontaminate areas of eastern Japan.

The government, however, has acknowledged that some land may not be habitable for decades.

Safeguarding Japan’s food supply also poses a challenge. Radioactive cesium, which could increase the risk of cancer, has been detected in a wide range of produce including beef, tea leaves, mushrooms, baby milk and rice, the nation’s staple.

“Not all of our battles are over,” Mr. Noda said, “but we will fight to the end.”

“It is a challenge for Japan, a challenge for humanity,” he said.

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/17/world/asia/japans-prime-minister-declares-fukushima-plant-stable.html?_r=1

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Yoshihiko Noda was born on May 20th, 1957 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoshihiko_Noda

May 20th, 1957

5 + 20 +1+9+5+7 = 47 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Famous.  Internationally known.  The future.

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May 20th, 1957

May 20th

5 + 20 +2+0+1+1 = 29 = his personal year (from May 20th, 2011 to May 19th, 2012) = Competency.  Experts.

29 year + 11 (November) = 40 = his personal month (from November 20th, 2011 to December 19th, 2011) = Help out your fellow human beings in their neighborhoods and communities.

40 month + 16 (16th of the month on Friday November 16th, 2011) = 56 = his personal day = Being diplomatic.  Walking on eggshells.  Make up your own mind on the matter.

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Yoshihiko Noda

761898926 5641         72

 

his path of destiny = 72 = Status quo.  The same old same old.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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Japan, USA ready for battle royal

Japan, USA ready for battle royal

The FIFA Women’s World Cup Germany 2011 comes to a conclusion on Sunday, with two-time world champions USA bidding to complete a hat-trick of titles against the technically accomplished Japanese, who are making their first appearance in the Final and have yet to record a win against the Americans.

It promises to be a tight encounter between two evenly matched sides who reached the final in identical style: the Stars and Stripes recording a 3-1 semi-final win over France, and the Japanese beating Sweden by the same scoreline.

The game
JapanUSA, Sunday 17 July, Frankfurt, 20.45 (local time)

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Minute-by-minute analysis of the Women’s World Cup final between the Americans and Japanese. The Journal’s Matthew Futterman and Laura Stevens are in Germany for the game, while Yoree Koh contributes from Japan and David Goldenberg provides commentary on the match and ESPN telecast.

  • For Japan, heroes abound. Besides the captain Sawa, the keeper Kaihori was a wall all day and knocked back two great shots in the shootout. Miyama got a goal after leading the attack much of the day, and Ando kept the U.S. team on its heels with her dangerous runs all day. Japan is certainly the biggest underdog winner in World Cup history — men’s or women’s.

  • The U.S. women are rightly devastated. They played one of their best games on the biggest stage, but to no avail. Homare Sawa brought her team back and totally outclassed the Americans in the shootout.

  • Kumagai up to win. And she does! What a comeback from Japan, your 2011 Women’s World Cup champion. That was magnificent. The Japanese never gave up even after going down twice.

  • Wambach scores. 2-1, Japan.

  • Sakaguchi scores to put Japan up 2-0. Solo got a hand on it but couldn’t push it out. Now the U.S. has to score.

  • Tobin Heath’s shot gets blocked, as well. Not a great shot, but a great block by Kaihori. The Americans look like novices here.

  • Lloyd’s goes high! But then Nagasato’s shot gets blocked by Solo. Japan is still up 1-0. Wow.

  • Miyama uses trickery to roll it in past Solo. Japan has the 1-0 edge.

  • Solo swings her arms as she walks up for her turn.

  • Shannon Boxx is going first. And she misses! Wow. She went to the same side as she did against Brazil — and a great kick save from Kaihori.

  • Everyone in the bar stands up and waits in trepidation, arms around each other.

  • U.S. kicks first.

    • 4:15 pm
    • Start of Penalty Kicks
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Who’s going to take the kick Rapinoe took against Brazil? Japan is up first in this shootout.

    • 4:14 pm
    • Start of Penalty Kicks
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    The commentators’ worst fears have come true. It may not be fair, but it’s pretty exciting.

  • Solo is on the field receiving medical attention. She looks like she’s in pain. Medics are wrapping her knee. Not what the U.S. wants to see right before penalty kicks.

    • 4:13 pm
    • 2-2, End of Extra Time
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    A good shot from Lloyd is blocked, and Heath’s follow-up is blocked as well. Bring on the PKs!

  • Red card! Azusa Iwashimizu takes down Morgan from behind right outside the box as she had an open path to the goal.

  • As Mana Iwabuchi comes in as a substitute, Abby Wambach gets a great service from Heather O’Reilly to her feet — but kicks it way over the goal.

  • It’s all about Sawa. “Sawa, we’ll give you all kinds of awards when you come home,” says one red-faced fan.

  • That was a gutsy goal by the captain. She has scored more goals than anyone else in the tournament with five. PKs coming now?

  • It’s more wild here than before — just a mish-mash of crazed shouts.

  • Goal! Homare Sawa with an amazing header on the ensuing corner. In her fifth World Cup, she scores a beauty.

    • 4:05 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 114th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Sawa puts a great ball through for Kinga, who catches Solo off her line. Rampone, though, runs back and clears the ball off the line for a corner. Solo looks a bit hurt from her effort.

    • 4:04 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 114th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Tobin Heath comes in for Rapinoe. I’m not sure why, though, besides for wasting time with a substitution. Rapinoe had another great day.

    • 4:03 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 113th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    There’s another miscommunication for the U.S. at the back as Rapinoe and Lloyd run into each other and leave the ball in front of the wide-open goal. No Japanese player takes advantage, though. That was a close one for the Americans.

    • 4:01 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 111th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Despite their long odds, the Japanese don’t look panicked. They keep building up slowly, though they’re bringing their defenders up now.

    • 3:59 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 108th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    An eerily similar play to Japan’s earlier goal as the ball bounces around in the six-yard box. This time, though, the U.S. clears it out.

    • 3:56 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 107th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Can the U.S. hold on? The Americans seem to be shrinking back into their defensive shell, which is what cost them a goal in the second half.

    • 3:55 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 106th Minute
    • by Yoree Koh
    • Add a Comment

    Fans are linking up here, but it’s quiet.

    • 3:55 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 105th Minute
    • by Laura Stevens
    • Add a Comment

    The players run in for a sip of water as the goalies change sides.

    • 3:54 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 105th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    That’s four headers for goals in four games for the beast in the air. Darke called it another Wambach winner, and Foudy just suggested that if the Americans win, U.S. Soccer will have to bronze Wambach’s head.

    • 3:53 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 103rd Minute
    • by Laura Stevens
    • Add a Comment

    The crowd goes wild! Jumping, hugging, waving of American flags. Flashes are going off across the stadium as everyone captures the moment on their cameras. “U-S-A!! U-S-A!!”

    • 3:53 pm
    • 2-1, United States, 103rd Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Goal! Wambach gets a great serve from Morgan and hits it in with — what else? – her head!

  • We’re not the only ones captivated by this match. The White House just released a photo of Barack Obama and his family tuning in, too.

  • O’Reilly makes another good run and serves it to Wambach, who gets stonewalled in front of the goal. The U.S. looks like the aggressors so far in extra time.

  • Miyama, who scored Japan’s lone goal, gets a yellow for a hard tackle. Amy Rodriguez and Stephanie Cox start warming up on the sideline for the Americans.

  • Morgan and Solo seem to be the two players with the most star power tonight. They both get the crowd roaring like no one else.

  • Morgan gets away again and looks like she might get another strike. She does, but it’s a bit too far wide.

  • The Americans are dominating possession in extra time, but they do seem a bit tired. Time for a substitute?

  • The U.S. starts quickly in extra time by earning a corner and two quick headers on goal from Wambach, but Kaihori gets them both.

  • Here we go! Excited fans are cheering. Air horns are going off to the beat of a drum.

    • 3:37 pm
    • 1-1, Start Extra Time
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    The Japanese players are lying all over the field getting treatment, while the U.S. is huddled up. Does it say anything about how tired the respective teams are? Chastain seems to think so. While we’re talking about the announcers, everyone in the studio seems to hate the idea of penalty kicks. I think fans like them more than former players.

  • Standing ovation from the crowd as regulation ends. The U.S. team huddles up on the field. The Japanese players’ legs are being shaken out by trainers.

    • 3:34 pm
    • 1-1, End of Regulation
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Sameshima gets free, but O’Reilly tracks her down to end regulation. We’re headed for extra time!

  • Two minutes of extra time draws cheers here.

  • Sakaguchi gets an opportunity but shoots it far left. Two minutes of extra time left.

  • Lots of nerves all around with both teams getting sloppy. No major chances in these last minutes of regulation so far.

  • The tension is building here in the stadium, but the crowd is loving it. Both teams are getting equal love when they get close to scoring or steal the ball.

  • Rapinoe’s kick is well-defended again, but the US is still on the offensive side of the field. The Americans are serving crosses all over the box, but Japan seems composed.

  • Lloyd makes a great run from midfield but gets stopped in the box. The U.S., though, is pressing forward and has earned a corner.

  • Another breakdown from the Americans as Japan keeps up the attack.

  • The bat breaks into the cheer song for the Sendai soccer team — one of the cities Tohoku affected by the earthquake and tsunami.

  • The crowd in Frankfurt goes wild again! Tons of screaming, flashes, air horns and Japanese flags waving!

  • Madness! Everyone breaks into “Nippon, nippon!”

  • Goal! Miyama takes advantage of a terrible clear by Buehler and Krieger. Miyama does well to finish it off.

    • 3:21 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 79th Minute
    • by Laura Stevens
    • Add a Comment

    The teams are playing to a sold-out crowd: 48,817 people.

    • 3:18 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 77th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Can the U.S. hold on for 15 more minute? Julie Foudy seems a bit nervous, despite her supposed impartiality as a commentator.

    • 3:17 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 76th Minute
    • by Yoree Koh
    • Add a Comment

    If ever stress were a reason to smoke: Almost everyone in the bar lit up right after Morgan’s goal.

    • 3:15 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 74th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    The U.S. scored, but Japan is now on the attack. A few shots by sub Yuki Nagasato and the Japanese captain Homare Sawa are keeping the American defenders on their toes.

    • 3:13 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 72nd Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
    • Add a Comment

    Morgan, the 22-year-old soccer prodigy, has not been intimidated by the greatest stage. She had an awesome (and similar) goal to put away France in the semis, and now this. She has tons of confidence.

    • 3:12 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 71st Minute
    • by Yoree Koh
    • Add a Comment

    And there it is. Fans are bemoaning Japan’s speed. But they’re still holding onto hope: “It’s OK, we still have 20 minutes,” mutter some spectators.

    • 3:12 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 70th Minute
    • by Laura Stevens
    • Add a Comment

    The stadium goes wild: jumping, cheering, air horns, flashes! American flags waving everywhere as the screen flashes “TOR! GOAL!”

    • 3:11 pm
    • 1-0, United States, 68th Minute
    • by David Goldenberg
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    Goal! Morgan gets a great feed from Rapinoe on a counter attack. She takes a terrific touch to beat Kumagai, then slots it past Kaihori. Beautiful shot. She makes Sundhage’s decision to put her in at halftime look very smart.

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Virtually a permanent fixture at the top of the FIFA/Coca-Cola Women’s World Ranking in the last three years, USA are looking to cement their status as one of the pre-eminent sides in the women’s game by winning their third world crown. Although their last FIFA Women’s World Cup™ title came back in 1999, the Americans won Olympic gold at Athens 2004 and again at Beijing 2008, and are strongly fancied to return to the top of the podium at Germany 2011.

The road to Germany
The two-time world champions reached the finals the hard way. An unexpected 2-1 defeat to Mexico in the semi-finals of the CONCACAF qualifying event denied them a direct ticket to Germany and meant they had to fight it out for the last available berth with Italy in a play-off. Alex Morgan’s injury-time strike gave them a 1-0 win in a tight first leg in Padua, with Amy Rodriguez scoring the only goal of the return leg to confirm the Stars and Stripes’ safe passage.

The star players
After the retirement of evergreen Kristine Lilly, Shannon Boxx takes over as the heartbeat and inspiration of the side, with a clutch of ambitious youngsters providing a talented supporting cast. Goalkeeping has always been one of the Americans’ strong suits and even though star shotstopper Hope Solo is an injury worry, Nicole Barnhart has proved herself a very able deputy. Striker Abby Wambach can be relied upon to carry a potent threat, while young forward Alex Morgan will be looking to fulfil the rich promise she showed at the FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup Chile 2008.

The coach
Not many of the coaches plying their trade at Germany 2011 have career records quite as impressive as Pia Sundhage. Aside from a spell with Lazio in Italy, the Swede spent all her playing career in her homeland, winning four Swedish league winners medals and four cup winners medals. In making 146 appearances for her country, she scored 71 goals and played at two FIFA Women’s World Cups (1991 – where Sweden finished third – and 1995) and the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. She also helped the Scandinavians win the European title in 1984.

After a stint as player-coach with Hammarby IF DFF she retired in 1996, whereupon she went to coach in the WUSA, winning the league in 2003 with Boston Breakers. An assistant to China coach Marika Domanski-Lyfors at the last FIFA Women’s World Cup finals, she then took charge of the USA team, steering them to success at the 2008 Algarve Cup and at the Women’s Olympic Football Tournament at Beijing later that year.

Previous FIFA Women’s World Cups 
USA have appeared in every FIFA Women’s World Cup finals to date. The only FIFA tournament they have ever failed to qualify for in any age category was the FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup Trinidad and Tobago 2010.

The Americans have never finished outside the top three at the world finals. Crowned world champions in 1991 and 1999, they took third place in 1995, 2003 and 2007.

The stat
2 – The number of games USA have lost in 66 outings since their semi-final exit at China 2007: against Norway in the opening match of the gold-medal-winning campaign at Beijing 2008, and that Germany 2011 qualifier against Mexico. Of their remaining games, they have won 58 and drawn six.

What they said
“Things have really changed since FIFA started the U-17 and U-20 Women’s World Cups. In the qualifiers, for example, we played against Costa Rica and Guatemala and they were both very technical. Technique is very important to the future of this sport and it’s something we need to work on in this country. We need players who are more technical. Standards have improved a lot and it’s going to get harder and harder to stay at the top of the Ranking. We’re doing what we can though,” USA coach Pia Sundhage, after her side finally reached Germany 2011.

Squad List

 
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Japan

Getty Images

Japan’s star continues to rise in global terms, not that the Nadeshiko have been poor performers in the past. Consistently strong showings at youth World Cups in recent years have seen their senior national team stocked with solid depth across all positions. An unlucky group stage elimination at the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup was followed by an equally unfortunate penalty shoot-out defeat in the final of the 2010 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup. Fast and technical approach play will test any team and Japan will be quietly confident of success after years of underachievement where they have reached the knockout stage on just one occasion.

The road to Germany
Though only finishing third in the 2010 AFC Women’s Asian Cup, the Japanese impressed as much as any team at the eight-nation tournament in China. The Nadeshiko won four of their five matches in the highly competitive Asian qualifying competition, including a group encounter against Korea DPR and the crucial play-off against China. The only failing was an unlucky 1-0 semi-final defeat against eventual champions Australia in which the team created a host of goalscoring opportunities.

The star players
Japan have an array of attacking talent led by Duisburg forward Kozue Ando who scored three goals in qualifying. Teen sensation Mana Iwabuchi received her much-anticipated first senior call-up in February 2010 with the 2008 FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup adidas Golden Ball winner scoring a brace in her second outing. The midfield is equally strong with diminutive Aya Miyama already a veteran despite being in her mid 20s. The jewel in the crown remains Homare Sawa, with the captain -whose international strike-rate is a goal every other game – looking to play in her fifth FIFA Women’s World Cup™.

The coach
Although only taking the reins in early 2008, Japan coach Norio Sasaki is highly versed in the women’s game. The astute Sasaki has led the Japanese at the 2008 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup and two AFC Women’s Asian Cups, with the team continuing to progress up the world rankings during this period. Sasaki also guided the Nadeshiko to fourth at the 2008 Women’s Olympic Football Tournament as the team reached an unprecedented high.

Previous FIFA Women’s World Cups

  • With China’s failure to qualify for Germany 2011, Japanwill claim the honour of being the only Asian nation to appear at all six editions of the FIFA Women’s World Cup™.
  • The Nadeshiko have just three wins from 16 matches and one quarter-final appearance in 1995 to show for their five World Cup appearances.


The stat
2 –
Japan scored at least two goals in four of their five qualification matches, the only exception being the 1-0 loss to Australia.

What they said
“We aim to be the FIFA Women’s World Cup champions,” Japan coach Norio Sasaki speaking prior to the 2010 AFC Women’s Asian Cup.

Squad List

 
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File:Flag of the United States (Pantone).svg
 
The United States was born on July 4th, 1776 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usa
 
July 4th, 1776
 
July 4th
 
7 + 4 +2+0+1+1 = 15 = USA’s personal year (from July 4th, 2011 to July 3rd, 2012) = Advertising.  Sponsors.
 
 
15 year + 7 (July) = 22 = USA’s personal month (from July 4th, 2011 to August 3rd, 2011) = Lucky.
 
 
22 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 39 = USA’s personal day = Perfect. Ideal. Nice.

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[0713soccer]

Abby Wambach was born on June 2nd, 1980 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abby_Wambach

June 2nd, 1980

6 + 2 +1+9+8+0 = 26 = her life lesson = what she is here to learn = Headers.  Headshots.  Popularity.  In the news.  Photos.  Photogenic.  Telegenic.  Charisma.  Personality.

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June 2nd, 1980

June 2nd

6 + 2 +2+0+1+1 = 12 = her personal year (from June 2nd, 2011 to June 1st, 2012) = Phenomenon.  Phenomenal.  Reversals.

12 year + 7 (July) = 19 = her personal month (from July 2nd, 2011 to August 1st, 2011) = Radiant.  Shining.  Beaming.  Vitality.  Life force.  Achievement.  Attainment.  Accomplishment.  It’s my time to shine.  Front and center.  Achieving success. 

19 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 36 = her personal day = Crushed.  Feeling like the weight of the world is on her shoulders.

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Lauren Cheney was born on September 30th, 1987 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lauren_Cheney

September 30th, 1987

September 30th

9 + 30 +2+0+1+0 = 42 = her personal year (from September 30th, 2010 to September 29th, 2011) = Everybody loves Lauren.

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Amy Rodriguez was born on February 17th, 1987 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amy_Rodriguez

February 17th, 1987

2 + 17 +2+0+1+1 = 23 = her personal year (from February 17th, 2011 to February 16th, 2012) = Athelte.  Sports.

23 year + 7 (July) = 30 = her personal month (from July 17th, 2011 to August 16th, 2011) = Having a lot to be thankful for.

30 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 47 = her personal day = Famous.  Internationally known.  Everybody knows her name.

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Alex Morgan was born on July 2nd, 1989 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alex_Morgan

July 2nd, 1989

7 + 2 +1+9+8+9 = 36 = her life lesson = what she is here to learn = Crushed.  Feeling like the weight of the world is on her shoulders.

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Megan Rapinoe Megan Rapinoe #16 of Team USA drives upfield with the ball against Team Ireland during the international women's soccer game held on July 23, 2006 at Torero Stadium in San Diego, California.   USA defeated Ireland 5-0.

Megan Rapinoe was born on July 5th, 1985 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megan_Rapinoe

July 5th, 1985

July 5th

7 + 5 +2+0+1+1 = 16 = her personal year (from July 5th, 2011 to July 4th, 2012) = Shocks.  Surprises.  Amazing.  Stunning.  Unpredictable.  Expect the unexpected.  Anything can happen.

16 year + 7 (July) = 23 = her personal month (from July 5th, 2011 to August 4th, 2011) = Athlete.  Sports.

23 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 40 = her personal day =  Helping out her fellow human being.

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Hope Solo was born on July 30th, 1981 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Solo

July 30th, 1981

7 + 30 +1+9+8+1 = 56 = her life lesson = what she is here to learn = Tiebreaker.  Decisive.

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Pia Sundhage was born on February 13th, 1960 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pia_Sundhage

February 13th, 1960

2 + 13 +1+9+6+0 = 31 = her life lesson = what she is here to learn = Competition.  Challenges.  Tests.  Contests.  Contestant.  Runner-up.  Competitor.  Contender.  Opponent.  Scrimmage.  Practice.  Training.  Trainer.  Stir.  Catalyst.  Reaction.  Risk.  Striving to be number 1.  Personal best.  Outdoing yourself.  Rising to the challenge.  Stirring things up.  Stirring the pot.  Provoke a reaction.  Bring it on.  C’mon. 

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Homare Sawa was born on September 6th, 1978 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homare_Sawa

September 6th, 1978

9 + 6 +1+9+7+8 = 40 = her life lesson = what she is here to learn = Helping out her fellow human being.

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September 6th, 1978

September 6th

9 + 6 +2+0+1+0 = 18 = her personal year (from September 6th, 2010 to September 5th, 2011) = Surreal.

18 year + 7 (July) = 25 = her personal month (from July 6th, 2011 to August 5th, 2011) = Thrilling.  Exciting.

25 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 42 = her personal day = Everybody loves Homare Sawa.

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Kozue Ando was born on July 9th, 1982 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kozue_Ando

July 9th, 1982

7 + 9 +1+9+8+2 = 36 = her life lesson = what she is here to learn = Crushing [the competition].  Bending over backwards. 

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Aya Miyama was born on January 28th, 1985 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aya_Miyama

January 28th, 1985

January 28th

1 + 28 +2+0+1+1 = 33 = her personal year (from January 28th, 2011 to January 27th, 2012) = Courage.  Bravery.

33 year + 6 (June) = 39 = her personal month (from June 28th, 2011 to July 27th, 2011) = Perfect.  Ideal.  Nice.

39 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 56 = her personal day = Tied the game 1-1.  1-0 tiebreaker in penalty kicks.

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Saki Kumagai in 2011.JPG

Saki Kumagai was born on October 17th, 1990 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saki_Kumagai

October 17th, 1990

October 17th

10 + 17 +2+0+1+0 = 30 = her personal year (from October 17th, 2010 to October 16th, 2011) = You have a lot to be thankful for.

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Mana Iwabuchi was born on March 18th, 1993 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mana_Iwabuchi

March 18th, 1993

March 18th

3 + 18 +2+0+1+1 = 25 = her personal year (from March 18th, 2011 to March 17th, 2012) =  Thrilling. Exciting.

25 year + 6 (June) = 31 = her personal month (from June 18th, 2011 to July 17th, 2011) = Competition. Challenges. Tests. Contests. Contestant. Runner-up. Competitor. Contender. Opponent. Stir. Catalyst. Reaction. Risk. Striving to be number 1. Personal best. Outdoing yourself. Rising to the challenge. Stirring things up. Stirring the pot. Provoke a reaction. Bring it on. C’mon.

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Nozomi YAMAGO

Nozomi Yamago was born on January 16th, 1975 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nozomi_Yamago

January 16th, 1975

January 16th

1 + 16 +2+0+1+1 = 21= her personal year (from January 16th, 2011 to Janauary 15th, 2012) = On the world stage.  For all the world to see.

21 year + 7 (July) = 28 = her personal month (from July 16th, 2011 to August 15th, 2011) = Heroine.  Unstoppable.

28 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 45 = her personal day = Intense.  Hardcore.

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Norio Sasaki was born on May 24th, 1958 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norio_Sasaki

May 24th, 1958

5 + 24 +1+9+5+8 = 52 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Keen.  Astute.  Able to size up people and situations.

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Japan was born on February 11, 660 BC according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan

February 11th, 660 BC

February 11th

2 + 11 +2+0+1+1 = 17 = Japan’s personal year (from February 11th, 2011 to February 10th, 2012) = Inspirational.

17 year + 7 (July) = 24 = Japan’s personal month (from July 11th, 2011 to August 10th, 2011) = Dominating.

24 month + 17 (17th of the month on Sunday July 17th, 2011) = 41 = Japan’s personal day = Melting your heart.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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17 April 2011 Last updated at 03:37 ET

The operator of Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has said it expects to bring the crisis under control within nine months.

Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) said it aimed to reduce radiation leaks in three months and to cool the reactors within an extra three to six months.

The utility said it also plans to cover the reactor building, which was hit by the huge quake and tsunami on 11 March.

Nearly 14,000 people died and another 14,000 are still unaccounted for.

On Sunday, the US pledged to support Japan’s reconstruction efforts.

Radiation levels in the sea near reactor 2 rose to 6,500 times the legal limit on Friday, up from 1,100 times a day earlier, says Tepco, raising fears of fresh radiation leaks.

‘Cold shutdown’

Tsunehisa Katsumata, the chairman of Tepco, Asia’s largest utility, told a news conference in Tokyo on Sunday that they would need up to nine months to bring the power plant to ”cold shutdown”.

He said the plan would allow the tens of thousands of families evacuated from the area around the facility to return home as soon as possible.

“We sincerely apologise for causing troubles,” Mr Katsumata said. “We are doing our utmost to prevent the crisis from further worsening.”

Japan’s government had ordered Tepco to come up with a timetable to end the leaks of radiation.

The BBC’s Roland Buerk in Tokyo says the problem is it is still not certain that the nine-month deadline is something that can be achieved.

Meanwhile, Tepco plans to send two remote-controlled robots into one of the reactors on Sunday to gauge radiation and temperature levels.

Emergency workers have been unable to enter any reactor building since the disaster.

from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13107846

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Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant was “born” on March 26th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fukushima_I_Nuclear_Power_Plant

March 26th, 1971

3 + 26 +1+9+7+1 = 47 = Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant’s life lesson = what Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant is here to learn = Famous.  Name & fame.  Notoriety.  Name recognition.  (Inter)nationally known.  High profile.  Well-known.  Household name.  Legacy. 

 

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Since the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant was “born” in 1971 it is 40 years old. 

The day of birth rules ages 27 to 54.

March 26th, 1971

26 = In the news.  Photos.

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17 April 2011 Last updated at 03:37 ET

The operator of Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has said it expects to bring the crisis under control within nine months.

Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) said it aimed to reduce radiation leaks in three months and to cool the reactors within an extra three to six months.

The utility said it also plans to cover the reactor building, which was hit by the huge quake and tsunami on 11 March.

Nearly 14,000 people died and another 14,000 are still unaccounted for.

On Sunday, the US pledged to support Japan’s reconstruction efforts.

Radiation levels in the sea near reactor 2 rose to 6,500 times the legal limit on Friday, up from 1,100 times a day earlier, says Tepco, raising fears of fresh radiation leaks.

‘Cold shutdown’

Tsunehisa Katsumata, the chairman of Tepco, Asia’s largest utility, told a news conference in Tokyo on Sunday that they would need up to nine months to bring the power plant to ”cold shutdown”.

He said the plan would allow the tens of thousands of families evacuated from the area around the facility to return home as soon as possible.

“We sincerely apologise for causing troubles,” Mr Katsumata said. “We are doing our utmost to prevent the crisis from further worsening.”

Japan’s government had ordered Tepco to come up with a timetable to end the leaks of radiation.

The BBC’s Roland Buerk in Tokyo says the problem is it is still not certain that the nine-month deadline is something that can be achieved.

Meanwhile, Tepco plans to send two remote-controlled robots into one of the reactors on Sunday to gauge radiation and temperature levels.

Emergency workers have been unable to enter any reactor building since the disaster.

from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13107846

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Tsunehisa Katsumata was born on March 29th, 1940 according to http://www.kddi.com/english/corporate/ir/shareholder/meeting/20100617/pdf/annualmeeting26.pdf

March 29th, 1940

March 29th

3 + 29 +2+0+1+1 = 36 = his personal year (from March 29th, 2011 to March 28th, 2012) = Weighty responsibilities.  Shouldering a heavy burden.  Feeling like the weight of the world is on his shoulders.

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Why Japan’s Mainstream Media Can’t Be Trusted To Report Objectively On TEPCO (東京電力)By Jake Adelstein | Published: 12 April 2011

When the earthquake struck Japan on March 11th and knocked out TEPCO’s Fukushima nuclear reactor, setting off a chain reaction of disasters–TEPCO’s chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata was nowhere to be found.  Where was he? He was on a tour of China with members of some of Japan’s largest media outlets–and TEPCO was footing the bill.

On March 30th, not only did TEPCO admit that the chairman had been taking Japanese mass media power brokers on the trip to China but also that TEPCO paid the majority of the travel fees for the participants. On April 7th, a reporter asked TEPCO to reveal the names of the mass media firms that had executives and/or former executives joining the chairman on his trip, but TEPCO dodged the question.

It’s well known that TEPCO pays huge advertising fees to most media outlets; it is one of the largest advertisers in Japan. It’s not as well known that the president of TEPCO, Masataka Shimizu, is also the chairman of  the Japan Society for Corporate Communication Studies (JSCCS), which includes among its members former and current top executives from Asahi Beer, Toyota, and Dentsu, Japan’s largest advertising agency. The board of directors also includes a representative of Nihon Television’s Reporting Bureau, Economic News section:

大野 伸 (日本テレビ放送網(株) 報道局 経済部)

In a sense, the president of TEPCO is the chairman of what is whispered to be the equivalent of a lobby group that wields the power of advertising revenue over anyone who crosses their paths. It is ostensibly a group of scholars, executives, advertising agency bosses, mass media representatives, and businessmen who gather together to study more effective means of communications. Veteran Japanese reporters assert that the society also functions as powerful consortium of large corporations who know how to use the threat of taking away advertising dollars as a whip to keep the Japanese media muzzled.

You don’t have to be too bright to figure out that if TEPCO, Toyota, Asahi Beer and Dentsu somehow banded together and pulled advertising from your newspaper, television channel, or radio program, that it would be financially devastating. In the April edition of weekly magazine Asahi Geino, Noted journalist, Takashi Uesugi claims that on March 15th, after repeatedly lampooning and criticizing TEPCO on TBS Radio that the producer asked him to leave the show, claiming that the program was being “revamped.” TBS Radio refuses to comment on the issue at present.

Masataka Shimizu, the president of TEPCO, is still listed as the chairman of the JSCCS but on April 1st his “greetings” were taken down from the sight and replaced with the words of the vice-chairman. The current page expresses condolences to the victims of the recent disasters. There is no mention of the problems at the Fukushima reactor,  only that Chairman Shimizu is now too busy dealing with the disaster to fully devote himself to his duties for the organization.

According to a mainstream Japanese media reporter, the TEPCO tours of China have been going on for over ten year. “The trips have a token amount of study, such as visiting a factory, or whatever has been scheduled to justify the event for that year. In reality, most of the day is devoted to sight-seeing. At night the TEPCO executives wine and dine the reporters, editors, or  mass media representatives. And of course, the obligatory karaoke.”

It’s not surprising that much of the Japanese mainstream media has been less than critical of  TEPCO up until now. It’s very hard to raise your voice loud enough to be heard from inside the pocket of your sponsor.

from:  http://www.japansubculture.com/2011/04/why-japans-mainstream-media-cant-be-trusted-to-report-objectively-on-tepco-%e6%9d%b1%e4%ba%ac%e9%9b%bb%e5%8a%9b%ef%bc%89/

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Jake Adelstein was born on January 1st, 1969 according to http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3001096.Jake_Adelstein

January 1st, 1969

1 +1+9+6+9 = 26 = his “secret” number = Journalist.  Reporter.  The press.  The media.

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Jake Adelstein

1125 145312595          44

his path of destiny / how he learns what he is here to learn = 44 = Twitter.  Tweeting.  In the moment.  Right here, right now.  How it is.  Get used to it.  What is.  The eternal now.  In the zone.  Be yourself.  Comfortable in your own skin.  I am me.  It is what it is.  I’m alright, right now.  How’s it going?  What’s up?  What’s going on?  What’s happening?  Here’s what’s happening.  Up-to-date.  Recently updated.  The latest update.  Latest development.  Keep me up-to-date.  I’ll keep you posted.  Play-by-play.  Moment by moment.  Current status.  Staying current.  Staying on topic.  Stay tuned.  Tune in.  Checking in with you to see where you’re at with things.  Stream of consciousness.  Daily diary.  Keeping a log.  Short-term memory.  Sitting still.  Sit back.  Whatever happens, happens.  Que será, será. 

follow Jake on Twitter:

http://twitter.com/jakeadelstein

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