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Archive for May, 2010

Franchitti_600

May 30, 2010 |  1:39 pm

Dario Franchitti won his second Indianapolis 500 on Sunday after dominating the race and his team owner Chip Ganassi made history, becoming the first owner to win the Indy 500 and NASCAR’s Daytona 500 in the same year.

Although Franchitti had the strongest car, he had to wait out several drivers who opted not to make a late pit stop with the leaders. Eventually, though, those drivers — who included defending race winner Helio Castroneves — were forced to pit for fuel and Franchitti regained the lead for good.

With his wife, actress Ashley Judd, rooting him on, Franchitti crossed the finish line under a caution flag because of a vicious crash involving Mike Conway and Ryan Hunter-Reay two laps from the end. Then Franchitti took the traditional drink of milk given to the winner at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

“It’s just as good the second time,” said Franchitti, who won his first Indy 500 in a rain-shortened race in 2007. Jamie McMurray, a driver on Ganassi’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Series team, won the Daytona 500 in February.

Dan Wheldon and Scott Dixon, two former Indy 500 winners, finished second and fourth, respectively. Alex Lloyd finished third.

Castroneves was trying to become only the fourth driver to win four Indy 500s, but his day was spoiled when he stalled his car after he made a pit stop on Lap 143. Until then, he had been running in the top five. He finished ninth.

Danica Patrick finished fifth after starting 23rd and struggling for much of the 200-lap race.

from:  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/sports_blog/2010/05/indianapolis-500-dario-franchitti-danica-patrick-tony-kanaan.html

Dario Franchitti was born on May 19th, 1973 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dario_Franchitti

May 19th

5 + 19 +2+0+1+0 = 27 = his personal year (from May 19th, 2010 to May 18th, 2011)

27 year + 5 (May) = 32 = his personal month (from May 19th, 2010 to June 18th, 2010) = Winning.  Victory.  Triumph.  Champion.  Mighty.  Glory.  Pride.  Top 10.  First place.  Number 1.  The best. 

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May 29, 2010

Dennis Hopper, who was part of a new generation of Hollywood rebels in portrayals of drug-addled misfits in the landmark films “Easy Rider,” “Apocalypse Now” and “Blue Velvet” and then went on to great success as a prolific character actor, died on Saturday at his home in Venice, Calif. He was 74.
The cause was complications from metastasized prostate cancer, according to a statement issued by Alex Hitz, a family friend.

Mr. Hopper, who said he stopped drinking and using drugs in the mid-1980s, followed that change with a tireless phase of his career in which he claimed to have turned down no parts. His credits include no fewer than six films released in 2008 and at least 25 over the past 10 years.

Most recently, Mr. Hopper starred in the television series “Crash,” an adaptation of the Oscar-winning film of the same title. Produced for the Starz cable channel, the show had Mr. Hopper portraying a music producer unhinged by years of drug use.

During a promotional tour last fall for that series, he fell ill; shortly thereafter, he began a new round of treatments for prostate cancer, which he said had been first diagnosed a decade ago.

Mr. Hopper was hospitalized in Los Angeles in January, at which time he also filed for divorce from his fifth wife, Victoria Duffy, with whom he had a young daughter. Mr. Hopper issued a news release citing “irreconcilable differences” for the filing.

“I wish Victoria the best but only want to spend these difficult days surrounded by my children and close friends,” he said in the release.

Mr. Hopper first won praise in Hollywood as a teenager in 1955 for his portrayal of an epileptic on the NBC series “Medic” and for a small part in the film “Rebel Without a Cause,” which starred James Dean, who was a friend of his.

Mr. Hopper confirmed his status as a rising star as the son of a wealthy rancher and his wife, played by Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor, in “Giant” (1956), the epic western with Dean.

In those years, he was linked romantically with Natalie Wood and Joanne Woodward.

Yet that success brought with it a growing hubris, and in 1958 Mr. Hopper found himself in a battle of wills with the director Henry Hathaway on the set of “From Hell to Texas.”

The story has several versions; the most common is that his refusal to play a scene in the manner that the director requested resulted in Mr. Hopper’s stubbornly performing more than 80 takes before he finally followed orders.

Upon wrapping the scene, Mr. Hopper later recalled, Mr. Hathaway told him that his career in Hollywood was finished.

He soon left for New York, where he studied with Lee Strasberg for several years, performed onstage and acted in more than 100 episodes of television shows.

It was not until after his marriage in 1961 to Brooke Hayward — who, as the daughter of Leland Hayward, a producer and agent, and Margaret Sullavan, the actress, was part of Hollywood royalty — that Mr. Hopper was regularly offered film roles again.

He wrangled small parts in big studio films like “The Sons of Katie Elder” (1965) — directed by his former nemesis Henry Hathaway — as well as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “Hang ’Em High” (1968).

And he grew close to his wife’s childhood friend Peter Fonda, who, with Mr. Hopper and a few others, began mulling over a film whose story line followed traditional western themes but substituted motorcycles for horses.

That film, “Easy Rider,” which Mr. Hopper wrote with Mr. Fonda and Terry Southern and directed, followed a pair of truth-seeking bikers (Mr. Fonda and Mr. Hopper) on a cross-country journey to New Orleans.

It won the prize for best first film at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival (though it faced only one competitor, as the critic Vincent Canby pointed out in a tepid 1969 review in The New York Times).

Mr. Hopper also shared an Oscar nomination for writing the film, while a nomination for best supporting actor went to a little-known Jack Nicholson.

“Easy Rider” introduced much of its audience, if not Mr. Hopper, to cocaine, and the film’s success accelerated a period of intense drug and alcohol use that Mr. Hopper later said nearly killed him and turned him into a professional pariah.

Given nearly $1 million by Universal for a follow-up project, he retreated with a cadre of hippies to Peru to shoot “The Last Movie,” a hallucinogenic film about the making of a movie. It won a top prize at the 1971 Venice Film Festival, but it failed with critics and at the box office.

Mr. Hopper edited the film while living at Los Gallos, a 22-room adobe house in Taos, N.M., that he rechristened the Mud Palace and envisioned as a counterculture Hollywood.

It was there that his drug-induced paranoia took full flower, including a period in which he posted armed guards on the roof.

“I was terribly naïve in those days,” he told The New York Times in 2002. “I thought the crazier you behaved, the better artist you would be. And there was a time when I had a lot of energy to display how crazy that was.”

Mr. Hopper was seen mostly in small film parts until he returned to prominence with his performance in “Apocalypse Now” (1979).

Dennis Hopper, who was part of a new generation of Hollywood rebels in portrayals of drug-addled misfits in the landmark films “Easy Rider,” “Apocalypse Now” and “Blue Velvet” and then went on to great success as a prolific character actor, died on Saturday at his home in Venice, Calif. He was 74.

The cause was complications from metastasized prostate cancer, according to a statement issued by Alex Hitz, a family friend.

Mr. Hopper, who said he stopped drinking and using drugs in the mid-1980s, followed that change with a tireless phase of his career in which he claimed to have turned down no parts. His credits include no fewer than six films released in 2008 and at least 25 over the past 10 years.

Most recently, Mr. Hopper starred in the television series “Crash,” an adaptation of the Oscar-winning film of the same title. Produced for the Starz cable channel, the show had Mr. Hopper portraying a music producer unhinged by years of drug use.

During a promotional tour last fall for that series, he fell ill; shortly thereafter, he began a new round of treatments for prostate cancer, which he said had been first diagnosed a decade ago.

Mr. Hopper was hospitalized in Los Angeles in January, at which time he also filed for divorce from his fifth wife, Victoria Duffy, with whom he had a young daughter. Mr. Hopper issued a news release citing “irreconcilable differences” for the filing.

“I wish Victoria the best but only want to spend these difficult days surrounded by my children and close friends,” he said in the release.

Mr. Hopper first won praise in Hollywood as a teenager in 1955 for his portrayal of an epileptic on the NBC series “Medic” and for a small part in the film “Rebel Without a Cause,” which starred James Dean, who was a friend of his.

Mr. Hopper confirmed his status as a rising star as the son of a wealthy rancher and his wife, played by Rock Hudson and Elizabeth Taylor, in “Giant” (1956), the epic western with Dean.

In those years, he was linked romantically with Natalie Wood and Joanne Woodward.

Yet that success brought with it a growing hubris, and in 1958 Mr. Hopper found himself in a battle of wills with the director Henry Hathaway on the set of “From Hell to Texas.”

The story has several versions; the most common is that his refusal to play a scene in the manner that the director requested resulted in Mr. Hopper’s stubbornly performing more than 80 takes before he finally followed orders.

Upon wrapping the scene, Mr. Hopper later recalled, Mr. Hathaway told him that his career in Hollywood was finished.

He soon left for New York, where he studied with Lee Strasberg for several years, performed onstage and acted in more than 100 episodes of television shows.

It was not until after his marriage in 1961 to Brooke Hayward — who, as the daughter of Leland Hayward, a producer and agent, and Margaret Sullavan, the actress, was part of Hollywood royalty — that Mr. Hopper was regularly offered film roles again.

He wrangled small parts in big studio films like “The Sons of Katie Elder” (1965) — directed by his former nemesis Henry Hathaway — as well as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “Hang ’Em High” (1968).

And he grew close to his wife’s childhood friend Peter Fonda, who, with Mr. Hopper and a few others, began mulling over a film whose story line followed traditional western themes but substituted motorcycles for horses.

That film, “Easy Rider,” which Mr. Hopper wrote with Mr. Fonda and Terry Southern and directed, followed a pair of truth-seeking bikers (Mr. Fonda and Mr. Hopper) on a cross-country journey to New Orleans.

It won the prize for best first film at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival (though it faced only one competitor, as the critic Vincent Canby pointed out in a tepid 1969 review in The New York Times).

Mr. Hopper also shared an Oscar nomination for writing the film, while a nomination for best supporting actor went to a little-known Jack Nicholson.

“Easy Rider” introduced much of its audience, if not Mr. Hopper, to cocaine, and the film’s success accelerated a period of intense drug and alcohol use that Mr. Hopper later said nearly killed him and turned him into a professional pariah.

Given nearly $1 million by Universal for a follow-up project, he retreated with a cadre of hippies to Peru to shoot “The Last Movie,” a hallucinogenic film about the making of a movie. It won a top prize at the 1971 Venice Film Festival, but it failed with critics and at the box office.

Mr. Hopper edited the film while living at Los Gallos, a 22-room adobe house in Taos, N.M., that he rechristened the Mud Palace and envisioned as a counterculture Hollywood.

It was there that his drug-induced paranoia took full flower, including a period in which he posted armed guards on the roof.

“I was terribly naïve in those days,” he told The New York Times in 2002. “I thought the crazier you behaved, the better artist you would be. And there was a time when I had a lot of energy to display how crazy that was.”

Mr. Hopper was seen mostly in small film parts until he returned to prominence with his performance in “Apocalypse Now” (1979).

In a 1993 interview with the British newspaper The Guardian, Mr. Hopper credited Marlon Brando, a star of the film, with the idea of having him portray a freewheeling photojournalist, rather than the smaller role of a C.I.A. officer, in which he was originally cast.

But Mr. Hopper’s after-hours style continued to affect his work; in “Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse,” a documentary about the making of that film, the director, Francis Ford Coppola, is seen lamenting that Mr. Hopper cannot seem to learn his lines.

After becoming sober in the 1980s, Mr. Hopper began taking on roles in several films a year, becoming one of the most recognizable character actors of the day.

He earned a second Oscar nomination for best supporting actor for his role as the alcoholic father of a troubled high school basketball star in “Hoosiers” (1986), and he honed his portrayal of unhinged villains in films like “Blue Velvet” (also in 1986), “Speed” (1994) and “Waterworld” (1995), as well as in the first season of the television series “24” (2002).

Mr. Hopper had several artistic pursuits beyond film. Early in his career, he painted and wrote poetry, though many of his works were destroyed in a 1961 fire that burned scores of homes, including his, in the Los Angeles enclave Bel Air.

Around that time, Ms. Hayward gave him a camera as a gift, and Mr. Hopper took up photography.

His intimate and unguarded images of celebrities like Ike and Tina Turner, Andy Warhol and Jane Fonda were the subject of gallery shows and were collected in a book, “1712 North Crescent Heights.” The book, whose title was his address in the Hollywood Hills in the 1960s, was edited by Marin Hopper, his daughter by Ms. Hayward.

He also built an extensive collection of works by artists he knew, including Warhol, Ed Ruscha and Julian Schnabel.

Born on May 17, 1936, in Dodge City, Kan., and raised on a nearby farm, Dennis Lee Hopper moved with his family to San Diego in the late 1940s.

He studied at the Old Globe Theater there while in high school, then signed a contract with Warner Brothers and moved to Los Angeles.

Mr. Hopper’s five marriages included one of eight days in 1970 to the singer Michelle Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. He is survived by four children, all of the Los Angeles area: Marin Hopper; Ruthanna Hopper, his daughter by Daria Halprin, his third wife; a son, Henry Lee Hopper, whose mother is Katherine LaNasa; and Galen, his daughter by Ms. Duffy.

On March 26, surrounded by friends like Mr. Nicholson and David Lynch, the director of “Blue Velvet,” Mr. Hopper received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Looking frail, he began his brief acceptance speech by sardonically thanking the paparazzi for supposedly distracting him and causing him to lose his balance and fall the day before. He continued, “Everyone here today that I’ve invited — and obviously some that I haven’t invited — have enriched my life tremendously.”

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/30/movies/30hopper.html

—————————————————————————————

Dennis Lee Hopper was born on May 17th, 1936

source:  http://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Hopper%2C_Dennis

and:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennis_Hopper

—————————————————————————————-

using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Dennis Lee Hopper

            3     8

his salvation/undoing number = LH = 38 = Caring.  Nurturing.  Support.  Feelings.  Emotions.  Mom.  Mothering.  Grandmother.  Grandma.  Maternal.  Mother’s intuition.  Baby.  Babying.  Babysitting.  Grab.  Embrace.  Hugs.  Squeezing.  Massage.  Cuddling.  Nuzzle.  Nestle.  Nest.  Cocoon.  Sensitive.  Taproot.  Mirroring.  Protecting.  Sheltering.  Cater.  Cooking.  Feeding.  Nurse.  Oxytocin.  Hormones.  Moist.  Birthing.  Coo(ing).  Hands.  Mitt.  Paw.  Mammal.  Bosom.  Cleavage.  Absorb.  Attachment.  Clinging.  Coddle.  Enabling.  Codependency.  Touchy.  Pouting.  Twisted.  Perverse.  Cancer.

 

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Diff'rent Strokes Star Gary Coleman Dies at 42 | Gary Coleman

Friday May 28, 2010 02:35 PM EDT

Gary Coleman, who by age 11 had skyrocketed to become TV’s brightest star but as an adult could never quite land on solid footing, has died after suffering a brain hemorrhage. He was 42.

Coleman died at 12:05 p.m. at the Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo, Utah, where he had been in a coma.

“He was removed from life support; soon thereafter, he passed quickly and peacefully,” his manager John Alcantar says. “By Gary’s bedside were his wife and other close family members.”

The actor suffered an intracranial hemorrhage at his Utah home on Wednesday night. On Thursday, he was “conscious and lucid,” the hospital says in a statement, “but by early afternoon that same day, Mr. Coleman was slipping in and out of consciousness and his condition worsened.”

Precocious Child

Despite congenital health problems which led to his never growing taller than 4’8,” Coleman experienced a towering achievement at the start of his career.

As Arnold Jackson, the plucky Harlem boy adopted into a wealthy white household on Diff’rent Strokes from 1978-86 – with his much-mimicked catchphrase of, “What’choo talkin’ ’bout, Willis?” – Coleman was pulling down as much as $100,000 per episode, though it was later reported that three-quarters of the money ended up being shelled out to his parents, advisers, lawyers and the IRS.

At the pinnacle of his fame in 1979 PEOPLE reported that Coleman had grown up in Zion, Ill., north of Chicago, with nephritis, a potentially fatal kidney defect.

He underwent two transplants before the age of 14. At one stage in his life, he underwent dialysis four times a day in order to survive.

“The reason I survived is that I had a kidney that wouldn’t give up,” he once said. “Now I got a Greek kidney donated from a kid who was hit by a car.”

“His talent,” said his mother, Sue, “may be God’s way of compensating him for what he’s been through, and the fact that he’ll never have the physical size of other boys.”

Coleman’s father, Willie, worked for a pharmaceutical company near Chicago, where Gary started modeling at age 5 after he wrote a brazen pitch letter to Montgomery Ward. (He could read at 3½.)

That led to commercials for McDonald’s and Hallmark cards before producer Norman Lear cast him in a pilot remake of The Little Rascals, which didn’t get picked up, en route to Diff’rent Strokes.

Troubled Lives

As has been chronicled, the three children on the series grew up into troubled lives. Dana Plato, 34, died of a drug overdose in 1999. (Plato’s son, Tyler Lambert, never came to terms with his mother’s death, and committed suicide on May 6, 2010. He was 25.)

The show’s Willis, actor Todd Bridges, now 45, was first arrested in 1994 after allegedly ramming someone’s car during an argument, He also has owned up to serious drug habit, which he struggled to beat.

By 1999, Coleman also faced troubles of his own. Long gone from Diff’rent Strokes, he had gone broke. His string of misadventures and humiliations included a bitter lawsuit that fractured his family, reports of erratic behavior (his father claimed Gary tried to run him over with a car during an argument in 1986) and a stint in 1998 as a security guard on a movie set.

All told, Coleman had amassed and lost an estimated $18 million fortune. Although he argued that his parents had a huge role in dissipating his wealth, he makes no apologies for having spent like a star. “I have lifestyle requirements,” he said at the time. “Photos, meetings, lunches, dinners, facial care, tooth care. It requires an exorbitant amount of money.”

Also in 1999, Coleman pleaded no contest to disturbing the peace after he punched a female autograph-seeker in California, for which he claimed self-defense. The previous year, he was again in the headlines, after allegedly hitting a pedestrian with his truck after arguing with him in a Salt Lake City bowling alley. In 2007, there was an incident involving a public argument with a female companion.

Married at 40

At times, there appeared to be turnarounds in his fortunes. In February 2008 – at the age of 40 – Coleman married for the first time. He’d met his bride, Shannon Price, on a movie set the previous August. She was 22.

Coleman admitted that Price was the first woman in his life. “I never got the opportunity to be romantic or feel romantic with anyone,” he said. “I wasn’t saving myself, she just happened to be the one.

Their relationship, they both admitted, was often rocky. “We may go a week and not speak to each other,” he said, while she claimed, “He lets his anger conquer him sometimes … He throws things around, and sometimes he throws it in my direction.” Still, they remained together, and Price survives him.

In recent months, Coleman suffered a series of medical problems. He had been admitted to hospitals three times this year: in January, for reasons that were not disclosed; in February, when he suffered a seizure on the set of TV’s The Insider; and again on May 26.

“Thanks to everyone for their well wishing and support during this tragic time,” his manager says. “Now that Gary has passed, we know he will be missed because of all the love and support shown in the past couple of days. Gary is now at peace and his memory will be kept in the hearts of those who were entertained by him throughout the years.”from:  http://www.people.com/people/article/0,,20389492,00.html

Gary Coleman was born on February 8th, 1968 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gary_coleman

February 8th, 1968

2 + 8 +1+9+6+8 = 34 = his life lesson = what he was here to learn = Speed.  Quickness.  Rapidity.  Swiftness.  Fastness.  Dexterity.  Agility.  Nimble.  Energy.  Fuel.  Gasoline.  Motor.  Engines.  Vehicle.  Acceleration.  Velocity.  Rate.  Quick.  Quickly.  Speeding up.  Full throttle.  Adrenaline.  Urgent.  Hurry.  Rush.  Busy.  Zip.  Zoom.  Dash.  Dart.  Slowing down.  Brakes.  Heat.  Explosive.  Blast.  Dynamite.  A fuse.  Fireworks.  Firecracker.  Skyrocket.  Volley.  Rapid fire.  Spin.  Turn.  Rotate.  Rabbit.  Hare.  Mitochondria.  Carbohydrates.  Calories.  Buzzing.  Humming.  Hive.  Swarm.  Sting.  Scratch.  Itch.  Rash.  Kidney.  Adrenals.  Cortisol.  Stress.  Tension.  Nerves.  Raw nerve.  Burn out.  Fry.  Sizzle.  Boiling.  Overheat.  Melt.  Blow up.  Erupt.  Lid.  Pressure.  Venting.  Steam.  Geyser.  Aerosol.  Rajasic.  Stimulation.  Stimulants.  Smoking.  Cigarettes.  Nicotine.  Coffee.  Caffeine.  Hyper.  Fever.  Temper.  Jealousy. 

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May 24, 2010 6:05 PM EDT

Slipknot bassist Paul Gray was found dead this morning in a hotel near Urbandale, Iowa. He was 38. According to the Des Moines Register, police found no evidence of foul play in Gray’s death, but the investigation is ongoing. The Polk County, Iowa Medical Examiner’s Office will conduct an autopsy and toxicology test tomorrow to determine the cause of his premature death. Gray’s body was found by a hotel employee at around 10:50 this morning and witnesses report seeing items removed from his room early in the afternoon. Slipknot’s manager confirmed the death to Rolling Stone but did not offer further details.

Gray, known to fans as “#2” and “The Pig,” co-founded Slipknot in 1995 with drummer Joey Jordison and percussionist Shawn Crahan and the band released their debut Mate. Feed. Kill. Repeat in 1996. The group has gone on to become one of the most successful and beloved acts in metal, earning legions of fans for their electric shows, over-the-top costumes and dark, anthemic brand of thrash music. Their 2008 album All Hope is Gone went to Number One and the band, who have been nominated for seven Grammys, took home an award in 2006 for Best Metal Performance.

Gray had his share of troubles in the past. In 2003, he was arrested in Des Moines for possession of cocaine, marijuana and drug paraphernalia following a car accident. But Gray seemed to turn his life around in recent years, reportedly marrying girlfriend Brenna Paul two years ago.

from:  http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/;kw=%5B13193,157006%5D

—————————————————————————————-

Paul Dedrick Gray according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Gray_(American_musician)

using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Paul Dedrick Gray

       4           7

 

his salvation number = DG = 47 = Famous.  Name & fame.  Notoriety.  Name recognition.  (Inter)nationally known.  High profile.  VIP.  Well-known.  Household name.  Public life.  Limelight.  Legendary.  Notable.  Noteworthy. 

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 May, 24 2010 9:11 AM

Venus Williams may just have reinvented the “little black dress.” Or, at the very least the Venus Williams French Open outfit created a buzz with her black and red trimmed corset-inspired tennis outfit Sunday. Venus Williams wore nude tights under her dress and it created an, let’s say, unique image on the clay court.

She and her sister Serena Williams are involved in the fashion business. And the secondary story to her Sunday is that she defeated Patty Schnyder of Switzerland 6-3, 6-3 in the first round of the French Open.

from:  http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/sports-sentinel-sports-now/2010/05/24/venus-williams-french-open-outfit-venus-williams-wears-statement-piece/

Venus Williams was born on June 17th, 1980

source:  http://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Williams%2C_Venus

June 17th

6 + 17 +2+0+0+9 = 34 = her personal year (from June 17th, 2009 to June 17th, 2010) = Buzz.  Hot.

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murphy

  • May 24, 2010 5:22PM
  • Screenwriter Simon Monjack was found dead at his home in the Hollywood Hills late Sunday local time, LA police sources said.

    The the 1800 block of Rising Glen Road, just five months after the death of his wife.

    At 9.24pm Sunday (2.24pm AEST), the Los Angeles Fire Department responded to a 911 call for an “unspecified medical aid request,” spokesman Brian Humphrey said.

    Police spokesman Sgt Louie Lozano said the preliminary cause of death is natural causes.

    ET Online reported he suffered a heart attack.

    “We have detectives at scene,” he told The Los Angeles Times.

    “They are conducting their investigation. Once we have further information, we will provide it.”

    Law enforcement sources told TMZ that Murphy’s mother, Sharon, found Monjack unconscious in the master bedroom.

    Paramedics attempted to resuscitate the 39-year-old on arrival, but he passed away from cardiac arrest, The Sun reported.

    Brittany Murphy, who starred in 8 Mile and Clueless, married the British screenwriter in May 2007.

    He was left heartbroken when his 32-year-old wife died on December 20 last year.

    A coroner’s office report said the cause of death was pneumonia and a drug overdose of prescription painkiller Vicodi.

    “My world was destroyed yesterday,” Monjack said the day after her death.

    After her death, British-born Monjack blamed Hollywood, saying film bosses had “blood on their hands.”

    He said Murphy was devastated just days before she died when an offer to be the voice of Gloria in the Happy Feet sequel was withdrawn.

    The star voiced Gloria in the original penguin flick.

     from:  http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/world/brittany-murphys-husband-simon-monjack-found-dead-reports/story-e6frf7lx-1225870663050

    —————————————————————————————

    using the number/letter grid:

    1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
    A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
    J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
    S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
     

    Where:

    A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

    B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

    C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

    D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

    E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

    F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

    G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

    H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

    I = 9               R = 9

      9  6     6   1          22

    Simon Monjack                  47

    1 4  5  4  51 32      25

    Simon’ Monjack’s path of destiny / how he learned what he was here to learn = 47 = Famous.  Name & fame.  Notoriety.  Name recognition.  (Inter)nationally known.  High profile.  VIP.  Well-known.  Household name.  Public life.  Limelight. 

    —————————————————————————————

    Simon Mark Monjack according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Monjack

    using the number/letter grid:

    1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
    A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
    J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
    S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
     

    Where:

    A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

    B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

    C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

    D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

    E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

    F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

    G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

    H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

    I = 9               R = 9

      9  6     1       6   1          23

    Simon Mark Monjack                   63

    1 4  5  4 92 4  51 32       40

    his path of destiny / how he learned what he was here to learn = Grief.  Grieving.  Weeping.  Wailing.  Lament.  Misery.  Anguish.  Nightmares.  Pitiful.  Dire.  Emergencies.  Tragic. 

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    LIMA

    May 23, 2010 | 10:55 a.m.

    Jose Lima, former Major League pitcher who won 21 games in 1999, dies at 37

    Jose Lima, a right-hand pitcher who was a 20-game winner and an All-Star during a 13-year major league career, died Sunday, the Los Angeles Dodgers said. He was 37.

    Lima, who won 13 games with the Dodgers in 2004, died of an apparent heart attack, according to the Aguilas Cibaenas, a winter ball team that Lima had played for in the Dominican Republic.

    “Lima was an exceptional man. This is a great loss for Dominican baseball and the country,” Llenas said.

    Referring to his often colorful outings as “Lima Time,” Lima posted his best season in 1999 when he was selected to the All-Star game as a Houston Astro. He went 21-10 in 35 starts with a 3.58 ERA for the NL Central champion Astros.

    In 13 major league seasons, the native of the Dominican Republic was 89-102 with a 5.26 ERA. He hadn’t pitched in the major leagues since a four-game stop with the New York Mets in 2006.

    “He was a man full of life, without apparent physical problems and with many plans and projects on the agenda,” Astacio said.

    Lima went 46-42 with the Astros between 1997-2001, and he was a 20-game winner and an All-Star with the Houston team.

    With the Dodgers in 2004 and 2005, Lima had a record of 13-5, with a 4.07 ERA. In the 2004 National League Division Series, Lima pitched a 5-hit shutout against the St. Louis Cardinals in front of a sell-out crowd at Dodger Stadium. It was the Dodgers first postseason win since Game 5 of the 1988 World Series.

    He also spent two stints with Detroit and Kansas City.

    “This is a shock for us because Lima was a young man who seemed healthy and nobody imagined this,” said Tomas Jimenez, manager of the Aguilas Cibaenas.

    from:  http://www.latimes.com/sports/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-us-obit-lima,0,5832059.story
    José Lima was born on September 30th, 1972 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jose_Lima

    September 30th, 1972

    9 + 30 +1+9+7+2 = 58 = his life lesson = what he was here to learn = Wellness.  Well being.  Bodily health.  Healthy body.  Robust health.  Strong constitution.  Healthful.  Hardy. 

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