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Archive for the ‘Egypt’ Category

Mohammed Morsi, the new Egyptian president

12:07 PM EDT                Sunday June 24, 2012

Mohamed Morsi was declared the new president of Egypt on Sunday, following the first democratic election in Egypt’s history.

The announcement triggered massive cheers and celebratory gunfire in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

Authorities had been on “high alert” for potential violence if his rival Ahmed Shafik won. Instead, the huge crowd erupted in celebration — even in scorching temperatures near 100 Fahrenheit (38 Celsius).

Morsi, of the Muslim Brotherhood, had more than 13 million votes, while Shafik — the last prime minister to serve under ousted president Hosni Mubarak — had more than 12 million, election officials announced.

Morsi ended up with just under 52% of the vote, while Shafik got just over 48%, officials said.

The Muslim Brotherhood‘s Freedom and Justice Party, on Facebook, called the election result a “tribute to the martyrs of our revolution.” It vowed, “We will keep walking on the path.”

On Twitter, the Muslim Brotherhood said the “battle for democracy” and justice hasn’t ended, and “we will remain” in Tahrir.

The presidency is largely a figurehead position, as the country’s military rulers maintain much of the control over the country.

Still, the vote was “a moment in history,” said Abdul Mawgoud Dardery, a fellow member of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party.

“We’ve been waiting for it for 7,000 years,” he said. “For the first time in history we have our own president, elected by us. The power of the people is now in the hands of the president — and the president has to go and move forward.”

Dardery called on Morsi to resign from the Muslim Brotherhood to make clear is is the president of all Egyptians.

Sunday’s announcement came after a very long speech by Farouq Sultan, head of the Higher Presidential Election Commission, in which he defended the electoral process and discussed reports of irregularities and how they were handled.

Each campaign had accused the other of election fraud.

Both candidates — who faced each other in a runoff last weekend — had already declared victory. Before the announcement on Sunday, both campaigns repeated that claim on Facebook.

Officials, calling for calm Sunday before the announcement, warned that they were ready to carry out long-standing policy of using deadly force against people who attack government buildings.

The only gunfire heard from Tahrir Square after the announcement was celebratory. The square was the site of mass protests last year that toppled Mubarak.

Sunday’s celebration showed the kind of public support for the Muslim Brotherhood that would have gotten demonstrators thrown in jail under Mubarak.

But in a country split between the two candidates, many were angered by the election result.

A group of Shafik supporters at a hotel were devastated by the result. One threw something at the screen as the announcement came.

Manal Koshkani, a Shafik supporter at the hotel, told CNN she and others “fear” the direction the Islamist party, the Muslim Brotherhood, could take Egypt.

“I hope we see a better future” Morsi, she said, adding, “I highly doubt it.”

On the other hand, Wael Ghonim, who helped organize the 2011 revolution, tweeted, “The first elected civilian Egyptian president in the history of modern Egypt. The revolution continues.”

The Muslim Brotherhood announced in advance Sunday that it would stage a long-term protest if Shafik was declared the winner.

Like Mubarak, Shafik is a former air force officer with close ties to Egypt’s powerful military and is “the quintessential candidate of the counter-revolution,” said Khaled Elgindy, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington.

Morsi, an American-educated engineer, “represents the older, more conservative wing of the Brotherhood and openly endorses a strict Islamic vision,” said Isobel Coleman of the Council on Foreign Relations.

But in an interview with CNN, Morsi said, “There is no such thing called an Islamic democracy. There is democracy only. … The people are the source of authority.”

More than 1,800 ambulances were dispatched across the country before the results were announced as a proactive measure, the state-run EgyNews agency reported. It also said the country’s interior ministry stressed the need to respect peaceful demonstrations.

But the ministry also said it would not tolerate any turmoil against authorities after Sunday’s pivotal announcement.

“Minister Mohamed Ibrahim has given police forces orders to shoot to kill against anyone attempting to attack police stations after the results,” interior ministry spokesman Gen. Marwan Mustapha said, reiterating government policy in such circumstances. “Increased security has been dispersed in the side streets of (Cairo’s) Tahrir Square to protect government buildings.”

The Muslim Brotherhood vowed it would stage “a long-term, open-end sit-in at Tahrir Square,” complete with bathroom facilities made of bricks, daily food supply and tight security at the entrances of the square, if Shafik won, said Jihad Haddad, a political adviser to the Muslim Brotherhood. Haddad cited the Brotherhood’s disapproval of the ruling military body’s new constitutional decree and de facto martial law.

Egypt’s all-powerful military leaders have said they won’t reverse their widely deplored constitutional and judicial changes and also cautioned against election-related unrest.

“We will face anyone who will pose a challenge to the public and private sectors with an iron fist,” the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) said.

Egypt’s constitutional court dissolved the lower house of parliament this month, extending the military’s power and sparking accusations of a coup d’etat.

Under an interim constitutional declaration, the military council retains the power to make laws and budget decisions until a new constitution is written and a new parliament elected.

The declaration said Supreme Council members “shall decide all matters related to military affairs, including the appointment of its leaders.” The president has the power to declare war, it says, but only “after the approval” of the Supreme Council.

The military council said it does not favor one political entity over another and respects the rights of Egyptians to protest but stressed the importance of self-restraint and respect for authority.

The Supreme Council urged political entities to respect democracy and “abstain from all possible acts that may descend the country into a full chaos.”

Egyptian reform leader Mohamed ElBaradei — the former head of the United Nations nuclear watchdog agency and a Nobel Peace Prize laureate — warned that if Shafik was declared the winner, “we are in for a lot of instability and violence … a major uprising.”

He said there were fewer security concerns about a Morsi victory because Shafik supporters were unlikely to take their anger to the streets.

Before the results were announced, ElBaradei described the current situation as “a total, complete 100% mess.”

Mohamed Mahsoob, a law professor at Menofiya University and a member of the El Wasat Party, tweeted: “The revolution will succeed, even if the newly elected president is below expectations because we will have the right to change him. But the revolution will not succeed if we have a president from the old regime that we toppled because he will working on seizing it back (and) reversing the accomplishments.”

Amr Moussa, who served as foreign minister under Mubarak and mounted an effort to win the presidency in these elections, said “the next Egyptian president must call upon everyone to stand united as one.” According to state-run news agency MENA, Moussa called on the new president “to head an emergency government of technocrats” that would last six to 12 months.

from:  http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/24/world/africa/egypt-politics/index.html

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Mohamed Morsi was born on August 20th, 1951 according to http://misrstars.com/vb/showthread.php?t=409740

August 20th, 1951

August 20th

8 + 20 +2+0+1+1 = 32 = his personal month (from August 20th, 2011 to August 19th, 2012) = Mainstream.  Consensus.  Winning.  Victory.

Six of Wands Tarot card

32 year + 6 (June) = 38 = his personal month (from June 20th, 2012 to July 19th, 2012) = Taking care of himself.

Queen of Cups Tarot card

38 month + 24 (24th of the month on Sunday June 24th, 2012) = 62 = his personal day = Dealing with restrictions.

Eight of Swords Tarot card

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undefined

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

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undefined

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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June 14, 2012           7:27 am

A constitutional court stepped into Egypt’s precarious politics Thursday by ruling that the former prime minister of deposed leader Hosni Mubarak could not be disqualified from this weekend’s polarizing presidential run-off election against a candidate from the Muslim Brotherhood.

The decision came the same day the court added fresh turmoil to the battle between secularists and the Muslim Brotherhood by ruling that one-third of the members of the Islamic-controlled parliament were unlawfully elected.

[Updated June 14, 8:10 a.m.: The verdict immediately dissolves parliament and forces new elections for all 498 lawmakers.

“The makeup of the entire chamber is illegal and, consequently, it does not legally stand,” said the Supreme Constitutional Court, according to state media reports.]

Both decisions infuriated political camps across this restive nation. Liberal activists opposed the candidacy of Ahmed Shafik, a Mubarak loyalist, as a dangerous endorsement of the repressive politics of the past. The ruling on the Islamist-controlled parliament was a setback to the Muslim Brotherhood, which was hoping to expand its power in the event its candidate, Mohamed Morsi, defeats Shafik in voting that begins Saturday.

[Updated June 14, 8:44 a.m.: The verdicts deepen tensions between Egypt’s military leaders and the ascendant Muslim Brotherhood over the political fate of a country that has been under authoritarian rule for decades. If Shafik wins and the Islamists lose parliament, the old guard would return to power in what may essentially be a repudiation of last year’s uprising that overthrew Mubarak.]

The court’s decision on Shafik was expected. The judges were appointed by Mubarak and the law passed by parliament to forbid former top regime officials from running for president was widely regarded as unconstitutional. The law was praised by activists, however, as a last chance to stop what they predict could be losing a revolution that has inspired the Arab world.

It is not clear how and when elections for new parliament will occur. The drafting of a new constitution has been delayed by political infighting and the nation — ruled by a military council — is in uncertain political terrain. Expecting unrest from the court rulings and this weekend’s elections, the Ministry of Justice on Wednesday granted the army wider power to arrest civilians and activists.

from:  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2012/06/egyptian-court-keeps-shafik-in-race-rules-one-third-of-parliament-elected-unlawfully.html

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Mohamed Hussein Tantawi was born on October 31st, 1935 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohamed_Hussein_Tantawi

October 31st, 1935

10 + 31 +1+9+3+5 = 59 = his life lesson = Everything falls apart.  Salvaging what remains.

Five of Swords Tarot card

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October 31st, 1935

October 31st

10 + 31 +2+0+1+1 = 45 = his personal year (from October 31st, 2011 to October 30th, 2012) = Things can go horribly wrong.

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—————————————————————————————–

undefined

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

undefined

12:51 PM EDT       Wednesday May 23, 2012

One of the world’s oldest civilizations took a major step toward democracy Wednesday, as Egyptians began a historic vote for president, even as many worried that the armed forces would quash the results if the top brass doesn’t like them.

It is the first time the country has had a presidential election where no one knows what the result will be before the ballots are cast.

“Finally, Egypt is born,” one weeping 80-year-old man told Rep. David Dreier, a California Republican who is in Cairo as an election observer.

Grandmother Nadia Fahmy, 70, was so determined to be the first one to vote at her polling station that she camped out in a plastic chair for 2½ hours before it opened.

“I am here to vote for the first time in my life,” said Fahmy. “I want to see a new generation for my country. I want everything to change.”

Other people told CNN they had waited up to four hours to vote as an atmosphere of enthusiasm swept polling stations in the capital.

The voting is a monumental achievement for those who worked to topple longtime President Hosni Mubarak in one of the seminal developments of the Arab Spring more than a year ago.

And it could reverberate far beyond the country’s borders, since Egypt is in many ways the center of gravity of the Arab world.

“Egypt has always set trends in the Arab world and for Arab political thought. Trends spread through the Arab world and eventually affect even non-Arab, Muslim-majority countries,” said Maajid Nawaz, the chairman of Quilliam, a London-based think tank.

Egypt’s election “bodes well for the rest of the Arab world and particularly those countries that have had uprisings,” said Nawaz, a former Islamist who was imprisoned in Egypt for four years for banned political activism.

There are 13 candidates on the ballot, although two withdrew from the race after ballots were printed.

An army of 30,000 volunteers has fanned out to make sure the voting is fair, said organizers with the April 6 youth movement, which has long campaigned for greater democracy and rule of law in Egypt.

They had seen only minor violations by lunchtime Wednesday, they said, mostly mentioning supporters of one candidate or another trying to influence voters at polling stations.

There is a pervasive fear that the powerful military, which has run the country since the fall of Mubarak, could try to hijack the election.

The concern persists despite the insistence of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces that it will hand over power to an elected civilian government. The military’s move to put armored personnel carriers on the streets with loudspeakers broadcasting a message that they will relinquish power has not convinced doubters.

Nawaz, the analyst in London, said Egypt probably is not heading toward a simple case of the military either giving up control or rejecting the results of the election.

Instead, he anticipated, there will be an “unhappy settlement” where the military remains “ever-present, in the shadows,” influencing the civilian government without controlling it.

“Egypt is going along similar lines to Turkey or Pakistan,” he said, naming two other countries that have formal democracies in place but where a powerful military can affect events.

The degree to which the military continues to exercise control in Egypt will depend on who wins the election, Nawaz anticipated — but laughed aloud when asked to predict who that would be.

Whoever wins the election, Nawaz said, will face tremendous challenges, even without worries about the army.

“They are inheriting a failed economy, an abysmal bureaucracy, a frustrated people, and a deep distrust on behalf of the people towards their military and any policing,” Nawaz said.

And Egypt has an elaborate political mosaic where alliances shift quickly, he added.

Secular democrats oppose military rule, for example, but if an Islamist candidate wins the presidency, “Some of the democrats would switch because they would rather have military rule than the Islamists,” Nawaz said.

“It’s far more complicated than ‘Islamists vs. liberal democracy.’ It’s rich vs. poor, (hardline) Salafists vs. the (more moderate) Muslim Brotherhood, secularists vs. Islamists,” he said.

On top of that, the country does not yet have a new constitution defining the powers of the president or the parliament, after a court last month suspended the committee charged with writing it. The court ruled that the members of the committee did not reflect the national population well enough.

Voting started Wednesday and is expected to continue through Thursday. Egyptians living abroad have already cast their ballots.

Among the candidates vying for the presidency are Mohamed Morsi, of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party; AmreMoussa, who served as foreign minister under Mubarak and headed the Arab League; Abdelmonen Abol Fotoh, a moderate Islamist running as a respected independent; Ahmed Shafik, who was Mubarak’s last prime minister; and Hamdeen Sabahy, a leftist dark-horse contender.

If no candidate gets a majority of the vote in the first round, a second round will be held June 16-17.

Results of the first round are not expected before the weekend.

Many Egyptians seem uncertain of their loyalties to any particular candidate, and even the weakest of arguments or the strangest of rumors can shift public opinion overnight.

The vote comes nearly 16 months after the popular uprising that brought down Mubarak in February 2011. Mubarak was tried on charges of ordering police to shoot protesters during the uprising against him, and of corruption.

He is awaiting the court’s verdict and could potentially face the death penalty.

Despite the high-profile trial of the man who ruled the country for 30 years, popular distrust and anger, particularly against the military’s power in Egyptian governmental affairs, still inspire protests, some of which have been marked by deadly clashes.

Protesters are upset at what they see as the slow pace of reform since Mubarak’s ouster. Some are also concerned that the country’s military leadership is delaying the transition to civilian rule.

In January, two Islamist parties won about 70% of the seats in the lower house of parliament in the first elections for an elected governing body in the post-Mubarak era.

The Freedom and Justice Party won 235 seats and the conservative Al Nour party gained 121 seats in the People’s Assembly, according to final results. The assembly consists of 498 elected members, and the rest of the seats were divided among other parties.

from:  http://www.cnn.com/2012/05/23/world/africa/egypt-elections/?hpt=hp_t2

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Abdelmonen Abol Fotoh was born on October 15th, 1951 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdel_Moneim_Aboul_Fotouh

October 15th, 1951

10 + 15 +1+9+5+1 = 41 = his life lesson = Things get ugly.

Ace of Cups Tarot card

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undefined

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

undefined

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

12:51 PM EDT         Wednesday May 23, 2012

One of the world’s oldest civilizations took a major step toward democracy Wednesday, as Egyptians began a historic vote for president, even as many worried that the armed forces would quash the results if the top brass doesn’t like them.

It is the first time the country has had a presidential election where no one knows what the result will be before the ballots are cast.

“Finally, Egypt is born,” one weeping 80-year-old man told Rep. David Dreier, a California Republican who is in Cairo as an election observer.

Grandmother Nadia Fahmy, 70, was so determined to be the first one to vote at her polling station that she camped out in a plastic chair for 2½ hours before it opened.

“I am here to vote for the first time in my life,” said Fahmy. “I want to see a new generation for my country. I want everything to change.”

Other people told CNN they had waited up to four hours to vote as an atmosphere of enthusiasm swept polling stations in the capital.

The voting is a monumental achievement for those who worked to topple longtime President Hosni Mubarak in one of the seminal developments of the Arab Spring more than a year ago.

And it could reverberate far beyond the country’s borders, since Egypt is in many ways the center of gravity of the Arab world.

“Egypt has always set trends in the Arab world and for Arab political thought. Trends spread through the Arab world and eventually affect even non-Arab, Muslim-majority countries,” said Maajid Nawaz, the chairman of Quilliam, a London-based think tank.

Egypt’s election “bodes well for the rest of the Arab world and particularly those countries that have had uprisings,” said Nawaz, a former Islamist who was imprisoned in Egypt for four years for banned political activism.

There are 13 candidates on the ballot, although two withdrew from the race after ballots were printed.

An army of 30,000 volunteers has fanned out to make sure the voting is fair, said organizers with the April 6 youth movement, which has long campaigned for greater democracy and rule of law in Egypt.

They had seen only minor violations by lunchtime Wednesday, they said, mostly mentioning supporters of one candidate or another trying to influence voters at polling stations.

There is a pervasive fear that the powerful military, which has run the country since the fall of Mubarak, could try to hijack the election.

The concern persists despite the insistence of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces that it will hand over power to an elected civilian government. The military’s move to put armored personnel carriers on the streets with loudspeakers broadcasting a message that they will relinquish power has not convinced doubters.

Nawaz, the analyst in London, said Egypt probably is not heading toward a simple case of the military either giving up control or rejecting the results of the election.

Instead, he anticipated, there will be an “unhappy settlement” where the military remains “ever-present, in the shadows,” influencing the civilian government without controlling it.

“Egypt is going along similar lines to Turkey or Pakistan,” he said, naming two other countries that have formal democracies in place but where a powerful military can affect events.

The degree to which the military continues to exercise control in Egypt will depend on who wins the election, Nawaz anticipated — but laughed aloud when asked to predict who that would be.

Whoever wins the election, Nawaz said, will face tremendous challenges, even without worries about the army.

“They are inheriting a failed economy, an abysmal bureaucracy, a frustrated people, and a deep distrust on behalf of the people towards their military and any policing,” Nawaz said.

And Egypt has an elaborate political mosaic where alliances shift quickly, he added.

Secular democrats oppose military rule, for example, but if an Islamist candidate wins the presidency, “Some of the democrats would switch because they would rather have military rule than the Islamists,” Nawaz said.

“It’s far more complicated than ‘Islamists vs. liberal democracy.’ It’s rich vs. poor, (hardline) Salafists vs. the (more moderate) Muslim Brotherhood, secularists vs. Islamists,” he said.

On top of that, the country does not yet have a new constitution defining the powers of the president or the parliament, after a court last month suspended the committee charged with writing it. The court ruled that the members of the committee did not reflect the national population well enough.

Voting started Wednesday and is expected to continue through Thursday. Egyptians living abroad have already cast their ballots.

Among the candidates vying for the presidency are Mohamed Morsi, of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party; AmreMoussa, who served as foreign minister under Mubarak and headed the Arab League; Abdelmonen Abol Fotoh, a moderate Islamist running as a respected independent; Ahmed Shafik, who was Mubarak’s last prime minister; and Hamdeen Sabahy, a leftist dark-horse contender.

If no candidate gets a majority of the vote in the first round, a second round will be held June 16-17.

Results of the first round are not expected before the weekend.

Many Egyptians seem uncertain of their loyalties to any particular candidate, and even the weakest of arguments or the strangest of rumors can shift public opinion overnight.

The vote comes nearly 16 months after the popular uprising that brought down Mubarak in February 2011. Mubarak was tried on charges of ordering police to shoot protesters during the uprising against him, and of corruption.

He is awaiting the court’s verdict and could potentially face the death penalty.

Despite the high-profile trial of the man who ruled the country for 30 years, popular distrust and anger, particularly against the military’s power in Egyptian governmental affairs, still inspire protests, some of which have been marked by deadly clashes.

Protesters are upset at what they see as the slow pace of reform since Mubarak’s ouster. Some are also concerned that the country’s military leadership is delaying the transition to civilian rule.

In January, two Islamist parties won about 70% of the seats in the lower house of parliament in the first elections for an elected governing body in the post-Mubarak era.

The Freedom and Justice Party won 235 seats and the conservative Al Nour party gained 121 seats in the People’s Assembly, according to final results. The assembly consists of 498 elected members, and the rest of the seats were divided among other parties.

from:  http://www.cnn.com/2012/05/23/world/africa/egypt-elections/?hpt=hp_t2

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Amre Moussa was born on October 3rd, 1936 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amre_Moussa

October 3rd, 1936

10 + 3 +1+9+3+6 = 32 = his life lesson = Mainstream.  Consensus.  Winning.  Victory.

Six of Wands Tarot card

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—————————————————————————————–

undefined

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

undefined

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

November 30th, 2011

Islamists claimed a decisive victory on Wednesday as early election results put them on track to win a dominant majority inEgypt’s first Parliament since the ouster of Hosni Mubarak, the most significant step yet in the religious movement’s rise since the start of the Arab Spring.

Zyad Elelaimy first emerged in January as a main voice of the youthful revolutionaries in Tahrir Square. Now he is running for a Parliament seat as a candidate in Egypt’s strongest liberal party.

The party formed by the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s mainstream Islamist group, appeared to have taken about 40 percent of the vote, as expected. But a big surprise was the strong showing of ultraconservative Islamists, called Salafis, many of whom see most popular entertainment as sinful and reject women’s participation in voting or public life.

Analysts in the state-run news media said early returns indicated that Salafi groups could take as much as a quarter of the vote, giving the two groups of Islamists combined control of nearly 65 percent of the parliamentary seats.

That victory came at the expense of the liberal parties and youth activists who set off the revolution, affirming their fears that they would be unable to compete with Islamists who emerged from the Mubarak years organized and with an established following. Poorly organized and internally divided, the liberal parties could not compete with Islamists disciplined by decades as the sole opposition to Mr. Mubarak. “We were washed out,” said Shady el-Ghazaly Harb, one of the most politically active of the group.

Although this week’s voting took place in only a third of Egypt’s provinces, they included some of the nation’s most liberal precincts — like Cairo, Port Said and the Red Sea coast — suggesting that the Islamist wave is likely to grow stronger as the voting moves into more conservative rural areas in the coming months. (Alexandria, a conservative stronghold, also has voted.)

The preliminary results extend the rising influence of Islamists across a region where they were once outlawed and oppressed by autocrats aligned with the West. Islamists have formed governments in Tunisia and Morocco. They are positioned for a major role in post-Qaddafi Libya as well. But it is the victory in Egypt — the largest and once the most influential Arab state, an American ally considered a linchpin of regional stability — that has the potential to upend the established order across the Middle East.

Islamist leaders, many jailed for years under Mr. Mubarak, were exultant. “We abide by the rules of democracy, and accept the will of the people,” Essam el-Erian, a leader of the Brotherhood’s new party, wrote in the British newspaper The Guardian. “There will be winners and losers. But the real — and only — victor is Egypt.”

Results will not be final until January, after two more rounds of voting. And the ultimate scope of the new Parliament’s power remains unclear because Egypt has remained under military rule since Mr. Mubarak resigned as president in February. But Parliament is expected to play a role in drafting a new Constitution with the ruling military council, although the council has given contradictory indications about how much parliamentary input it will allow.

The emergence of a strong Islamist bloc in Parliament is already quickening a showdown with the military. Brotherhood leaders announced Wednesday that they expected the Islamist parliamentary majority to name a prime minister to replace the civilian government now serving the military. In response, a senior official of the military-led government insisted that the ruling generals would retain that prerogative.

The unexpected rise of a strong ultraconservative Islamist faction to the right of the Brotherhood is likely to shift Egypt’s cultural and political center of gravity to the right as well. Leaders of the Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party will likely feel obliged to compete with the ultraconservatives for Islamist voters, and at the same time will not feel the same need to compromise with liberals to form a government.

“It means that, if the Brotherhood chooses, Parliament can be an Islamists affair — a debate between liberal Islamists, moderate Islamists and conservatives Islamists, and that is it,” Michael Wahid Hanna, an Egyptian-born researcher at the Century Foundation in Cairo, said this week.

The ultraconservative Salafi parties, meanwhile, will be able to use their electoral clout to make their own demands for influence on appointments in the new government. Mr. Hanna added: “I don’t mind saying this is not a great thing. It is not a joyous day on my end.”

If the majority proves durable, the longer-term implications are hard to predict. The Brotherhood has pledged to respect basic individual freedoms while using the influence of the state to nudge the culture in a more traditional direction. But the Salafis often talk openly of laws mandating a shift to Islamic banking, restricting the sale of alcohol, providing special curriculums for boys and girls in public schools, and censoring the content of the arts and entertainment.

Their leaders have sometimes proposed that a special council of religious scholars advise Parliament or the top courts on legislation’s compliance with Islamic law. Egyptian election laws required the Salafi parties to put at least one woman on their electoral roster for each district, but they put the women last on their lists to ensure they would not be elected, and some appear with pictures of flowers in place of their faces on campaign posters.

Sheik Hazem Shouman, an important Salafi leader, recently rushed into a public concert on the campus of Mansoura University to try to persuade the crowd to turn away from the “sinful” performance and go home. He defended his actions on a television talk show, saying he had felt like a doctor making an emergency intervention to save a patient dying of cancer.

The new majority is likely to increase the difficulty of sustaining the United States’ close military and political partnership with post-Mubarak Egypt, though the military has said it plans to maintain a monopoly over many aspects of foreign affairs. Islamist political leaders miss no opportunity to criticize Washington’s policies toward Iraq, Afghanistan, Israel and thePalestinians. And while Brotherhood leaders have said they intend to preserve but perhaps renegotiate the 1979 Camp David peace treaty with Israel, the Salafi parties have been much less reassuring. Some have suggested putting the treaty to a referendum.

Speaking on the condition of anonymity, an Israeli official acknowledged concerns: “Obviously, it is hard to see in this result good news for Israel.”

Some members of Egypt’s Coptic Christian minority — about 10 percent of the population — joked Wednesday that they would prepare to leave the country. Previously protected by Mr. Mubarak’s patronage, many have dreaded the Islamists’ talk of protecting the Islamic character of Egypt. Some Brotherhood leaders often repeat that they believe citizenship is an equal right of all regardless of sect, even chanting at some campaign rallies that Copts are also “sons of Egypt.” But Salafis more often declare that Christians should not fear Islamic law because it requires the protection of religious minorities, an explanation that many Christians feel assigns them second-class status.

Most Copts voted for the liberal Egyptian bloc, which was vying for second place with the Salafis in some reports. It was an eclectic alliance against the Islamists, dominated by the Social Democrats, a left-leaning party with ties to the revolution’s leaders, and by the Free Egyptians, the business-friendly party founded and promoted by Naguib Sawiris, the Coptic Christian media-and-telecommunications tycoon.

The results indicated that some of the candidates and slates put forward by the former ruling party appeared to have won back their seats. It was unclear how large a bloc they might form, but they could prove sympathetic to the familiar mantra of stability-above-all that the ruling military is putting forward.

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/01/world/middleeast/voting-in-egypt-shows-mandate-for-islamists.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

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Essam el-Erian was born on April 28th, 1954 according to http://www.ikhwanweb.com/article.php?id=23101

April 28th, 1954

4 + 28 +1+9+5+4 = 51 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Government.  Elections.  Voting.  Votes.  Ballots.  Officials.  President.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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Mona Seif followed her parents' example of social activism but  brought her generation's tools to the cause: social networking.

June 16, 2011 — Updated 1315 GMT

Mona Seif is deep in a crowd of thousands, her cell phone camera held high overhead. She is streaming live video and pushing for a better shot of a protest in Tahrir Square, the spiritual heart of the Egyptian revolution. It is Friday in downtown Cairo, and people are shouting and screaming across the square, waving signs and chanting in unison.

A fever for change pulses through the land of the Pharaohs. It is weeks after the revolution — yet the fever here still has not broken. Nearly every Friday across much of Egypt, crowds take to the streets, their passion and push for change still visible.

Seif, a soft-spoken, petite brunette with big brown eyes, is on the lookout for human rights abuses or beatings of protesters — her specialty and personal crusade. Before the day is over, she will send dozens of tweets, post online pictures and video, and record her observations and interviews with people in the streets.

And this is not even her day job.

Mona Seif followed her parents’ example of social activism but  brought her generation’s tools to the cause: social networking.

Seif is a cancer research lab worker. But she is also a blogger and internet activist, one of Egypt’s many prominent internet revolutionaries who helped topple former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in February. Though their revolution is officially over, they consider the fight ongoing and any sort of real democracy but a far-off dream. They continue to tweet and upload photos and live-streaming video for all the world to see.

A similar network of online bloggers and activists stretches across the entire Middle East and North Africa, from Yemen in the east to Morocco in the west, many of them friends and in constant contact with one another. Mostly in their mid-20s, the young i-revolutionaries have various motivations and backgrounds. For Seif, the mission is personal and, in many ways, an inherited mantle.

She comes from a well-known and respected family of Egyptian human rights activists, dissidents and protesters who have helped shape her view of the world and prepare her and her siblings to take a place on the front lines of Egypt’s revolution, using the latest technological and digital weapons.

She was born into the fight, literally. On the day of her birth, her father was in prison because of his activism. Ahmed Seif El-Islam Hamad is an internationally known human rights attorney in Cairo who was arrested in 1983 and held five years for his work with the country’s socialist movement.

During his detention, he was tortured, which he has spoken about publicly. After his release, he dedicated himself to fighting torture and injustice, becoming central to some of Egypt’s most celebrated human rights cases. A decade after he was freed, Ahmed Seif helped found one of Egypt’s top human rights centers. Much of his work at the Hisham Mubarak Law Centre has put him in direct conflict with the Mubarak regime.

Mona's mother, Laila Soueif,  is known for standing up to the opposition with her scolding, booming voice and steely eyes.

Mona’s mother, Laila Soueif,  is known for standing up to the opposition with her scolding, booming voice and steely eyes.

Mona Seif’s mother, Laila Soueif, is a math professor at Cairo University who helped organize many of the country’s most important demonstrations against the Mubarak regime during the last two decades.

At the height of the last big pro-democracy push, known in part for the “Kefayah” movement in 2005, Soueif was among a group of women assaulted by Mubarak thugs on the streets. In that attack, Mona’s older brother, Alaa, protected his mother by repelling blows with his arm, which was broken in the attack. Soueif is widely known on the streets as brash and courageous, and has on numerous occasions faced down baton-wielding policemen with nothing but her scolding, scathing, booming voice and steely eyes.

“She is unbelievable,” Mona said of her mother. “The joke with all of our friends is, if you see Laila Soueif in a protest, then you stick to her and you will be safe.”

“People always assume, (because) she is a woman and she has white hair, so they want to protect her. But really she doesn’t fear anything. She never fears state security. I have one photo of her in a protest where she is literally pushing against this line of state security policemen. She’s amazing in this sense.”

With their parents so involved in politics and dissent, Mona and her siblings grew up hearing about torture, repression, injustice and the law. The Mubarak dictatorship and police brutality were typical subjects of dinner-table conversation.

Seif’s oldest brother, Alaa Abd El Fattah, is a computer programmer who has become one of the most widely known internet revolutionaries in Egypt. He and his wife, Manal, created the Egyptian blog aggregator site Manalaa. Shortly after the incident with his mother in 2005, Alaa’s insightful, analytical blogs, in which he documented and analyzed the growing abuses by the Mubarak regime, captured attention. As his voice grew, Alaa, too, became a threat to the regime. He was arrested at a demonstration in 2006 and imprisoned for some 45 days.

Mona and Manal helped organize a successful worldwide online campaign to free Alaa. Upon his release, he and his wife moved to South Africa, where they continue their campaigns and criticism.

Mona’s younger sister, Sanaa, is also already involved in helping organize rallies and groups of young activists.

Mona, the middle child, always knew this was her path.

“I’ve always known I’ll be politically active. It’s sort of, I don’t know, part of my heritage I guess,” she said. “But I needed to find my own space,” a way to make her own mark. “Using Twitter, using social networks, and with my phone, working on cases of military detentions, tribunals and torture — this has become my own space. I’ve found my own way of being part of all of this now.”

In 2010, as events began to heat up, leading to the revolution, Mona began regularly attending demonstrations and working to help the cause.

“I actually celebrated my 25th birthday at a demonstration, in front of the ministry of prosecution. My friends were all there and it was very funny.”

During the revolution, between January 25 and February 5, when President Mubarak finally stepped down, Mona’s entire family was together in the square, night and day. Aunts and uncles and cousins came from afar — one from London — to join them.

“We actually had our first family reunion in a long time in Tahrir Square, during the revolution,” Mona said.

Facing down the Mubarak regime is something she will never forget.

“It was a life-changing moment for most of the people in Tahrir Square. You could see the gunshots at people, and you could see how people were just going to face the thugs that were attacking us, with nothing to protect themselves. …

“This was the important moment when everyone realized that everyone in Tahrir Square is willing to take this to the end, no matter what. From that moment on, for me and a lot of others, we had this blind faith that we really will win in the end.”

Today, Mona’s main political focus is on individuals who have been detained by the military and are denied due process or fair representation. Many detainees have been held with virtually no legal representation, she said, and many of the trials of protesters by the military have been conducted en masse.

“We have evidence that the military right now is targeting protesters. … They selected known figures of the Tahrir protest. They selected people who were known and they tortured and beat them up,” she said. “And if you read or listen to the testimonies of those who were released, which are a few, we still have a lot of people detained unconstitutionally. And you see that it’s not just that they’re getting tortured or beaten up, but there’s an element of the Army trying to break the revolutionary spirit.”

CNN’s request for an interview with the Egyptian military leaders was denied. CNN was instead given a statement denying these allegations.

“These cases of torture are false rumors. None of these accounts are true. We are in unstable times in Egypt. There are thugs loose,” said the statement from the Egyptian military spokesman.

Mona Seif said the military used different tactics against male revolutionaries than they did the women.

“For the guys, they said the officer told them that they won’t stop beating them up until they say ‘Long live Mubarak.’ In another testimony, they told them to raise their hands up high, and when they would do this they would get beat, kicked in their faces and their heads. …

“And for the girls, they line them up and ask them who is a virgin and who is not, and whoever says she’s a virgin, they got someone, an officer wearing a white coat, so they assume he’s a doctor, to check whether they are virgins or not with the threat that those who lied about their virginity would probably face prostitution charges. … You could see it was just to break their spirit. Because in Egypt, in this culture, nothing would break their spirits far more than this.”

The Army has admitted they did the virginity tests, saying it was a way to prevent women from making false claims of rape while they were in prison.

Mona works closely with many other online activists, including her friends Gigi Ibrahim and Ramy Raoof. They say the number of those who have been denied justice is not small.

“When we started following some of the cases of the protesters, we realized that since January 28 there are thousands of Egyptian citizens who have gone through this. … They try at least 100 people per one trial. They don’t care about investigations; they don’t care about the presence of a lawyer. So far we have 500 names of people who were tried before a military court.”

The detainees who get released are asked to record what happened to them.

“They write it down. Some of them we managed to get their video testimonies right after they were released, so it actually shows bruises and burn marks.”

The testimonies are now online, as a common blog, called the Tahrir Diaries.

“Especially with the army violations and the army torture cases,” she said, “the Internet is really our only means of fighting this.”

from:  http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/meast/06/16/arab.unrest.irevolution/index.html

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

Mona Seif

4651 1596      37

 

her path of destiny / how she learns what she is here to learn = 37 = Heartfelt.  Heart-centered leader.  Father.  Dad [Ahmed Seif El-Islam Hamad].  Looking out for the best interest of everyone.  My fellow countrymen.

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Each letter of the first name rules 9 years of life.  Ages 0 to 27 are ruled by the sum of the first three letters of the name.

Mona Seif

13 (M is the 13th letter of the alphabet) + 15 (o is the 15th letter of the alphabet) + 14 (n is the 14th letter of the alphabet) = 42

So from ages zero to twenty-seven she has the number 42 going on.

42 = Everybody loves Mona Seif.

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

Mona Seif

4           6

how she obtains her heart’s desire = MF = 46 = Making history.

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Lara Logan, CBS correspondent

Wednesday 16 February 2011 03.23 GMT

[Lara Logan of CBS News, pictured in Cairo’s Tahrir Square shortly before she was attacked on February 11.]

CBS News journalist Lara Logan is recovering in hospital this week after being violently attacked and sexually assaulted by a mob in Egypt‘s Tahrir Square on Friday, according to a statement by CBS.

Amid the celebrations on the night of Hosni Mubarak’s resignation, Logan was reporting on the scenes in Tahrir Square for the news programme 60 Minutes when the South African-born journalist, her camera crew and security staff were overwhelmed by what the US television network described as “a dangerous element … a mob of more than 200 people whipped into frenzy”.

“In the crush of the mob, she was separated from her crew. She was surrounded and suffered a brutal and sustained sexual assault and beating before being saved by a group of women and an estimated 20 Egyptian soldiers,” CBS said in its statement released on Tuesday evening.

“She reconnected with the CBS team, returned to her hotel and returned to the United States on the first flight the next morning. She is currently in the hospital recovering.”

Logan joined CBS in 2002, after a television news career that included a spell at GMTV covering the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001, and is a veteran of reporting from warzones including Iraq and Kosovo.

CBS’s chief foreign affairs correspondent, Logan had previously been detained by the Egyptian military for a day, as part of the Mubarak regime’s crackdown on foreign journalists.

Logan serves on the board of the Committee to Protect Journalists, which documented 140 attacks on journalists in Egypt during the protests this month.

“We have seen Lara’s compassion at work while helping journalists who have faced brutal aggression while doing their jobs. She is a brilliant, courageous and committed reporter. Our thoughts are with Lara as she recovers,” said Paul Steiger, chairman of the committee.

CBS said it will make no further comment. “Logan and her family respectfully request privacy at this time,” the network said in its statement.

from:  http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/feb/16/lara-logan-cbs-egypt-tahrir

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As reports of the sexual assault of reporter Lara Logan circulated around the globe, many Egyptians have come forward to express their disgust at the incident in which Ms Logan was also badly beaten by members of the crowd who were celebrating the ousting of their former president Hosni Mubarak.

The 39 year old South African born Chief Foreign Correspondant for CBS News was attacked during a terrifying ordeal in Cairo’s Tehrir Square, by a mob of around 200 people after being separated from her colleagues whilst she was covering the crowd’s celebrations.

The ex swimwear model and former GMTV journalist was forced to undergo several frightening experiences throughout the day before her attack.  In the hours preceeding the outrage,  Egyptian authorities escorted Ms Logan and her crew at gunpoint whilst making suggestions that the group were not in the country for the purpose of peaceful reporting.  The actions of Egyptian police in this matter remain as yet unexplained.

Ms Logan was eventually saved by a group of soldiers and women who intervened and is currently recovering from her injuries in hospital.

In a week which has witnessed near constant marches and gatherings of huge crowds in Cairo, several journalists have been injured, some stabbed and others punched to the ground by frenzied mobs.

One Egyptian woman referring to the assault said “This is a problem which has been ongoing in Egypt for the last four years and it doesn’t seem to be going away”.

from:  http://ozute.com/lara-logan-assault-heighlights-underlying-problem-in-eygpts-society/224369/

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Lara Logan was born on March 29th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lara_Logan

March 29th, 1971

29 +1+9+7+1 = 47 = her “secret” number = Famous.  Name & fame.  Notoriety.  Name recognition.  (Inter)nationally known.  High profile.  VIP.  Well-known.  Household name.  Public life.  Limelight.  Legendary.  Notable.  Noteworthy.  Eminent.  Prominent. 

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March 29th, 1971

March 29th

3 + 29 +2+0+1+0 = 35 = her personal year (from March 29th, 2010 to March 28th, 2011) = Remain guarded.

35 year + 1 (January) = 36 = her personal month (from January 29th, 2011 to February 28th, 2011) = Crushed.

36 month + 11 (11th of the month on Friday February 11th, 2011) = 47 = her personal day = Famous.  Name & fame.  Notoriety.  Name recognition.  (Inter)nationally known.  High profile.  VIP.  Well-known.  Household name.  Public life.

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