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Archive for the ‘2011 executions’ Category

Texas execution

September 21, 2011     4:32 pm

One of three people convicted in the 1998 dragging death of a black man in Jasper, Texas, was  executed Wednesday night for his part in the slaying, the Associated Press has reported.

[Updated 4:41 p.m.: Earlier reports said the execution was scheduled.]

The racially motivated killing of James Byrd Jr. stunned the nation, sparking protests, inspiring the movie “Jasper, Texas,” and leading to state and federal hate-crime legislation.

One of Byrd’s sisters planned to be in Huntsville, Texas, for the execution; another planned to hold a prayer vigil in Jasper, according to the Beaumont Enterprise.

The night he was killed, Byrd had accepted a ride home from a white man he knew, Shawn Berry, then 24, and two of Berry’s friends — John King, then 23, and Lawrence Brewer, then 31. King and Brewer were later identified as white supremacists.

Brewer, now 44, was the one scheduled for execution.

Instead of taking Byrd home, the men drove him down a remote county road, beat him unconscious, urinated on his body, chained him by his ankles to the truck and dragged him for three miles. When the truck made a hard turn at a bend in the road, Byrd’s head struck a cement culvert and he was decapitated. The three men then dumped his remains in front of an African American cemetery and went to a barbecue.

The three were later tried and convicted of Byrd’s murder. Brewer and King received the death penalty, while Berry was sentenced to life in prison. King is appealing his sentence, but Brewer had no appeals pending late Wednesday, a spokeswoman for the Texas attorney general’s office told The Times.

In a July interview with Beaumont’s KFDM-TV, the first Brewer has granted since he was convicted in 1999, he admitted driving the truck but said he was not responsible for killing Byrd.

“I know in my heart I participated in assaulting him, but I had nothing to do with the killing as far as dragging him or driving the truck or anything,” Brewer said.

Brewer told KFDM that he was willing to die.

“I’m for the death penalty. I feel that if you take a life you should pay for it by taking your own life if you’re actually guilty of taking a life,” Brewer said.

He also said that for him, the death penalty will be a relief.

“This is a good out for me,” he said. “I don’t want a life sentence, period, with or without parole. I wouldn’t be happy with that.”

from:  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/nationnow/2011/09/texas-set-to-execute-man-for-1998-dragging-murder-of-james-byrd-jr.html

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Lawrence Russell Brewer

LRB

  92

 

his undoing number = RB = 92 = Prosecuted.

 

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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PHOTO: Convicted murderer Andrew DeYoung is to die at 7 p.m. on July 20, 2011 for the 1993 slayings of his parents and teenage sister in suburban Atlanta.

July 20, 2011

The Georgia Supreme Court has upheld a Fulton County judge’s order to videotape an execution scheduled for Wednesday evening after the state attorney general’s office appealed the decision.

This is thought to be the first time a lethal injection will be recorded and the first time in almost two decades that an execution will be recorded.

The decision came after attorneys claimed that one of the drugs administered in the lethal injection may cause unnecessary suffering.

Andrew Grant DeYoung, 37, is scheduled to be executed at 7 p.m. for the 1993 murders of his sister and parents. DeYoung was charged with stabbing his family to death in hopes of receiving an inheritance he could use to fund a business venture.

Gregory Walker, another death row inmate, was the petitioner for the order requesting the videotaping.

“The petitioner seeks such access in order to preserve potential evidence regarding whether the respondent and the Department of Corrections are taking appropriate steps to prevent needless suffering through the course of execution,” said the order, signed by Superior Court Judge Bensonetta Tipton Lane on Monday.

The order added that the videotaping would proceed only if DeYoung was not opposed to it. After the execution, the tape is to be immediately sealed and no copies can be made.

Though DeYoung consented to the video recording, his lawyers spent Tuesday in federal court arguing that the execution should be postponed until more is known about the controversial drug now being used in the executions.

A federal judge and the state Supreme Court today denied the stay, but the U.S. Supreme Court still may consider the matter.

In the original Superior Court order for the videotaping, Judge Lane said, “The Court is not making a finding that any executions have been ‘botched’ but is finding that there are many facts relevant to the constitutionality of the State’s execution process that is has refrained from disclosing to those who seek to challenge it.”

The drug in question is pentobarbital, also known as Nembutal. Previously, sodium thiopental was used as the first drug in a series of three during the execution, but the manufacturer stopped making it, causing a nationwide shortage.

In many states, including Georgia, the drug was replaced by pentobarbital, a sedative often used to euthanize animals.

Georgia used pentobarbital for the first time in June for the execution of Roy Blankenship, and reporters who witnessed the execution said that Blankenship “jerked his head several times throughout the procedure and muttered after the pentobarbital was injected into his veins,” according to court documents.

“Pentobarbital is a wholly untested drug that is not used to administer anesthesia to healthy human subjects, so it basically amounts to Russian roulette,” said Brian Kammer, a lawyer involved in the cases of DeYoung, Blankenship and Walker.

Kammer said that even before the implementation of pentobarbital, three executions were botched in Georgia. He claimed the state was already struggling with implementation when it added the new drug.

Kammer added that the drug hasn’t been tested and is not adjusted for weight or metabolism. Further, he said it isn’t being administered by an anesthesiologist or even a nurse anesthetist, and is actually being administered by untrained prison staff.

Pentobarbital is manufactured by a company in Denmark called Lundbeck that has publicly said that the drug should not be used in state executions.

Kathryn Hamoudah, chairwoman of Georgians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty, said that videotaping DeYoung’s execution is like “putting a Band-Aid on the issue.”

She said it would be better to put a stay on the execution and look into all of the issues surrounding the drug before proceeding.

Georgians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty is an organization that opposes the death penalty but supports government transparency regarding the issue.

“Death is final, so doing proper diligence is necessary,” Hamoudah said.

The Georgia State Department of Corrections declined to comment on the videotaping of DeYoung’s execution or the use of pentobarbital

“We’re working with the attorney general’s office to make sure we’re following correct procedure,” spokeswoman Kristen Stancil said, “and we’re confident in our ability to carry out an execution properly.”

 

from:  http://abcnews.go.com/US/atlanta-judge-orders-videotaping-lethal-injection-execution/story?id=14118367

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

Andrew Grant DeYoung

154955 79152 4576357       90

 

his path of destiny = 90 = It ends where it all began.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

 

 

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Roy Willard Blankenship

June 24, 2011

A Georgia man convicted of killing an elderly Savannah woman more than three
decades ago has been executed by state corrections officials.

Roy Willard Blankenship was put to death by lethal injection Thursday night
at the state prison in Jackson after state and federal courts turned down his
appeals. The 56-year-old was pronounced dead at 8:37 p.m.

Blankenship was the first person put to death in Georgia using the sedative
pentobarbital as part of the three-drug execution combination, and his lawyers
claimed the drug was unsafe and unreliable. But state and federal courts
rejected their appeals.

He was put to death for the 1978 murder of Sarah Mims Bowen, who died of
heart failure after she was raped in her Savannah apartment.

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// ]]>from:  http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=13918773

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9
Roy Willard Blankenship

9                  2

his primary challenge = RB = 92 = Prosecution.

 

 

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