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Archive for the ‘Deepwater Horizon’ Category

Government Filed First Charges

April 24, 2012          1710 GMT

The first criminal charges have been filed in connection with the BP Gulf oil disaster two years ago, the Justice Department said Tuesday.

Former BP engineer Kurt Mix was arrested in Texas on charges of intentionally destroying evidence requested by authorities, officials said.

An estimated 4.9 million barrels (206 million gallons) of crude poured into the Gulf of Mexico after the April 2010 explosion that sank the drill rig Deepwater Horizon and killed 11 men aboard.

Oil spewed into the sea for nearly three months before a cap was placed on the BP-owned Macondo well, nearly a mile beneath the surface.

from:  http://edition.cnn.com/2012/04/24/us/gulf-oil-spill/?hpt=us_c2

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Kurt Mix

2392 496          35

 

his path of destiny = 35 = Forewarned is forearmed.  Guarded.  Defending himself.

Nine of Wands Tarot card

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Kurt Mix

2         6

 

how he obtains/loses his heart’s desire = KX = 26 = Photos.  The media.  In the news.  Making headlines.

Page of Wands Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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you can try to figure out some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology is available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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June 18, 2010, 1:49PM ET

Without debate, the Louisiana House on Friday sent Gov. Bobby Jindal legislation that would require him to preserve and make public all documents his office handles regarding the Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster.

Jindal now has to decide whether to sign or veto the measure. Spokeswoman Melissa Sellers said the bill would require thorough review.

The Jindal administration has gone along with some attempts to open up governor’s office records. But officials have successfully fought bills letting the public see any documents pertaining to the governor’s “deliberative process” and requiring the preservation of those documents.

The bill given final approval Friday was originally drawn to reduce the amount of time the state corrections department is required to preserve records of adult offenders. But language added in the Senate this week by Sen. Robert Adley, a Republican from Benton, requires preservation of governor’s office documents regarding the oil spill for at least 10 years and says those records must be available for public inspection and copying now.

“I would encourage him to sign the bill so we can send a clear message to the people of America,” Adley said after the House voted 76-13 for the bill on Friday.

Final passage of the proposal “speaks very, very highly of our state and what we stand for. In this process with BP, we want their records open and we will do the same,” he said.

Jindal has said he wants BP PLC to open its claims database to the state to help ensure payments are being processed promptly.

Given his past opposition to similar legislation, the bill with Adley’s amendment passed with surprising ease. It first passed in the Senate on Wednesday, where it was little noticed at first. It then passed the House on Friday, where similar language had been voted down a day before.

Rep. Gary Smith, D-Norco, sponsor of the original bill, asked the House to adopt Adley’s amendment, saying the public needs information on the unfolding environmental disaster. Nobody spoke against the measure.

Sellers, Jindal’s communications director, said in an e-mailed statement that the Adley language would be reviewed to make sure it doesn’t hurt the state’s position in future litigation against BP. Spokesman Kyle Plotkin declined to elaborate.

Jindal has become one of the most prominent faces in the state’s fight against the oil spill, constantly on the scene at sites where oil has washed ashore. He often laments a slow, inefficient cleanup effort by the federal government and BP. His reaction to the spill has been praised widely, but he’s not without his critics.

Among them has been congressional candidate and state Rep. Juan LaFonta, a New Orleans Democrat. Last month, he tried to win House committee passage of a resolution critical of Jindal, a Republican, for not immediately declaring a state of emergency after the April 20 Deepwater Horizon explosion. The resolution was defeated.

Jindal declared an emergency nine days after the rig explosion, when federal officials and BP said the leak and the potential devastation of the spill was far worse than originally thought.

from:  http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9GDR38G0.htm

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Bobby Jindal was born on June 10th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_jindal

June 10th

6 + 10 +1+9+7+1 = 34 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn =Speed.  Quickness.  Rapidity.  Swiftness.  Fastness.  Dexterity.  Agility.  Nimble.  Energy.  Fuel.  Gasoline.  Motor.  Engines.  Vehicle.  Acceleration.  Velocity.  Rate.  Quick.  Quickly.  Speeding up.  Full throttle.  Adrenaline.  Cars.  Driving.  Urgent.  Hurry.  Rush.  Busy.  Zip.  Zoom.  Dash.  Dart.  Slowing down.  Brakes.  Turbine.  Pump.  Funnel.  Flow.  Circulate.  HVAC.  Vent.  Duct.  Pipes.  Heat.  Stove.  Boiler.  Radiator.  Thermostat.  Therm.  Fahrenheit.  Celcius.  Kelvin.  Temperature.  Warm.  Toasty.  Hot.  Sweat.  Fiery.  Wirey.  Smoke.  Fire.  Flammable.  Volatile.  Combustible.  Incendiary.  Implosion.  Explosive.  Blast.  Dynamite.  A fuse.  Fireworks.  Firecracker.  Skyrocket.  Barrage.  Cortisol.  Stress.  Tension.  Nerves.  Raw nerve.  Burn out.  Fry.  Sizzle.  Boiling.  Overheat.  Melt.  Blow up.  Erupt.  Pop.  Cap.  Lid.  Pressure.  Venting.  Steam.  Geyser.  Gush.  Go at the right speed.  Strike while the iron’s hot.  Get it while it’s hot.  Things happen really quickly.  Don’t rush.  Haste makes waste.  Speed up.  Slow down.  Hitting the brakes.  Full speed ahead.  Where the rubber meets the road.  Slower/faster.  Don’t stress.  Don’t stress out over it.  Blowing off steam.  Burn off some energy.  IM (instant message).  Urgent message.  Fast blast.  Warm up.  Turning up the heat.  Fanning the flames.  Hot water.  Boiling hot.  Out of the frying pan and into the fire.  If you play with fire you will get burned.  If you can’t stand the heat, then get out of the kitchen.  Several irons in the fire.  Where there’s smoke there’s fire.  A fire in the heart makes smoke in the head.  Blowing your top/stack.  That burns me up.  Strike a flint and you get fire.  Fueling the fire.  Tinder box.  The one who strikes first, strikes twice.  Burning your candle at both ends.  Full tank of gas.  Run out of gas.  Empty tank.  Running out of steam.  Put a lid on it.  Wind up.  Wound up.  Pent up.  Bottled up.  Stir crazy.  Burning inside.  Blood pressure.  Rapid pulse.  Circulatory system.  Fleet of foot.  Rushing around.  I can’t keep up with you.  To go faster, slow down.  Festina lente (make haste slowly).  The need for speed.  Life in the fast lane.  Spinning your wheels.  Communication difficulties.  Wires crossed.  Stressed out.  Nerve wracking.  Frayed nerves.  Short fuse.  Going berserk.  Lashing out in anger.        
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June 10th, 1971

June 10th

6 + 10 +2+0+0+9 = 27 = his personal year (from June 10th, 2009 to June 9th, 2010) = Initiative.  Follow through.  Original.  The first.  Innovation.  Trailblazer.  Pioneer.  Inventor.  Start.  Begin.  Initiate.  Groundbreaking.  Drilling.  BP.

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April 20th, 2010 (the date of the BP oil spill)

4 + 20 +2+0+1+0 = 27 = the life lesson of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill = Groundbreaking.  Drilling.  BP.

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

BP

27

the primary challenge for BP = 27 = Groundbreaking.  Drilling.  All talk and no action. 

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Anthony Bryan Hayward CCMI (born 21 May 1957) is the Chief Executive of oil and energy company BP Group, taking over from John Browne, Baron Browne of Madingley on 1 May 2007.

Life and career

Hayward gained a first class geology degree from Aston University in Birmingham followed by a PhD from the University of Edinburgh.  Joining BP in 1982, with his first job as a rig geologist in Aberdeen, he quickly rose through the ranks in a series of technical and commercial roles in BP Exploration in London, Aberdeen, France, China and Glasgow. Hayward first came to Lord Browne’s attention during a leadership conference in 1990 in Phoenix, Arizona. As a result he was made Browne’s executive assistant.

In 1992, Hayward moved to Colombia as exploration manager and became president of BP’s operations in Venezuela in 1995. In August 1997 he returned to London as a director of BP Exploration. He became group vice president of BP Amoco Exploration and Production as well as a member of the BP group’s Upstream executive committee in 1999.

Hayward was appointed BP group treasurer in September 2000 where his responsibilities included global treasury operations, foreign exchange dealing, corporate finance, project finance and mergers and acquisitions. Hayward became an executive vice president in April 2002, and Chief Executive of exploration and production in January 2003.

In 2009, Hayward was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Science from University of Edinburgh.

Replacement of Lord Browne

In light of safety and resultant production issues in Alaska and the report on the explosion at the Texas City refinery, Peter Sutherland, BP’s non-executive chairman, accelerated the process for replacing Lord Browne, bringing the timetable forward from end-2008 (when Browne would be 60, and nominally forced to retire under BP’s rules) to July 2007. Hayward, having been termed CEO designate by both internal and media commentators, came to the fore amid the competition, including Robert Dudley, chief executive of TNK-BP, the company’s Russian joint venture, and John Manzoni, head of refining and marketing.

On 18 December 2006 in the run-up to replace Lord Browne as Chief Executive of BP Group, the Financial Times reported that Hayward had criticised BP’s management at an internal management meeting, in the wake of a blast at the firm’s Texas City refinery that killed 15 people and injured more than 170 others.  Hayward made the comments at a town hall meeting in Houston: “We have a leadership style that is too directive and doesn’t listen sufficiently well. The top of the organisation doesn’t listen sufficiently to what the bottom is saying.”

On 12 January 2007 it was announced that Hayward would replace Lord Browne as BP Chief Executive.  In preparation for Hayward’s take up as Group CEO, on 2 February Andy Inglis was appointed managing director of the BP Group, and succeeds Hayward as chief executive of BP’s Exploration & Production (E&P) business.

Hayward was appointed to the Chief Executive position with immediate effect on 1 May 2007, after Lord Browne resigned following the lifting of a legal injunction preventing Associated Newspapers from publishing details about his private life.

BP pays Hayward an annual salary of £998,000 and in 2008 his bonus was £1,496,000.

Negotations with Russia’s Igor Sechin

In 2008 Tony Hayward had private meetings with Igor Sechin, a top figure of Russian military and security services. The two negotiated on BP’s deals with Russia.

Deepwater Horizon oil spill

On 20 April 2010, an explosion occurred on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, operated by BP. 11 people were killed in the blast and oil began to leak from the ocean floor at a rate variously estimated to be between 5,000 and 100,000 barrels per day. Hayward, and BP in general, initially downplayed the spill, stating on 17 May 2010 that the environmental impact of the Gulf spill would likely be “very very modest” and calling the spill “relatively tiny” in comparison with the size of the ocean.  By 27 May, Hayward had apparently changed his assessment, calling the spill an “environmental catastrophe” in an interview with CNN.

Hayward has stated that his job might be at risk as a result of the spill, saying “we made a few little mistakes early on.”  Hayward received criticism for various statements he has made during the spill, including telling a camera man to “get out of there” during a photo-op on the shores of Louisiana.  On 30 May, Hayward told a reporter “we’re sorry for the massive disruption it’s caused to their lives. There’s no one who wants this thing over more than I do, I’d like my life back.”  Hayward was widely criticized for the comment and United States Representative Charlie Melancon (D-La.) called on Hayward to resign in the wake of this comment.  He later apologized for the comment on BP America’s Facebook Page.  On 31 May, Hayward disputed claims of huge underwater plumes of oil suspended in the Gulf, as had been reported by scientists from three universities.  Hayward said there was “no evidence” that plumes of oil were suspended under the sea, and that because it is lighter than water any plumes seen are just in the process of rising to the surface. A chemist from Louisiana State University agreed with this assessment.  Still other scientists have suggested that the manner of expulsion of the oil from the well and the use of dispersants may have led to an emulsion situation in which the oil is suspended in water for some time.

On 5 June the Daily Telegraph reported that Hayward sold approximately one third of his shares in BP a month before the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded.  The shares subsequently fell in value by 30%, although the Telegraph stated: “There is no suggestion that he acted improperly or had prior knowledge that the company was to face the biggest setback in its history.”  In an interview on NBC on 8 June, President Barack Obama said that Hayward “wouldn’t be working for me after any of those statements”, referring to the remarks Hayward made following the spill.

Other positions

Hayward was a member of the Citibank advisory board, from 2000 to 2003.  Hayward is presently senior independent non-executive director of Corus Group, appointed in April 2002, and a non-executive director of Tata Steel. Hayward is a committee member of Audit, Nominations and Health, Safety and Environment.   Hayward was appointed a Companion of the Chartered Management Institute in September 2005.

Personal life

Hayward is married with two children, and lives near Sevenoaks, Kent.

from:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Hayward

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May 21st, 1957

5 + 21 +1+9+5+7 = 48 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Purpose.  Meaning.  Mission.  Direction.  Destination.  Guidance.  Goals.  Aims.  The meaning of life.  Who am I?  Why am I here?  What is the meaning of life?  What’s this life for?  Your calling in life.  Soul searching.  Finding yourself.  Seek and ye shall find.  Dark night of the soul.  There’s got to be more to life than this.  Walking away from it all.  Send out into the world.  What’s the point?  Where is this going? 

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Tony Hayward

2      8  7    94

 

his primary challenge = TH = 28 = Bold.  Daring.  Heroic.  Survivor.  Overcoming obstacles.  Personal power.  Willpower.  Possibilities.  Vulnerability.  Reckless.  Lightweight.  Pathetic.  Weak.  Scrawny.  Wimp.
 

The most important thing he can do = TY = 27 = Initiative.  Follow through.  Original.  The first.  Innovation.  Trailblazer.  Pioneer.  Inventor.  Start.  Begin.  Initiate.  Groundbreaking.  Drilling.  Drill.  New start.  Fresh start.  First step.  The beginning.  Reset.  Restart.  Contraption.

[The synasty between Tony Hayward and BP (and the oil spill) is worth noting.

BP

27

The primary challenge of BP = 27

It is also worth noting that the oil spill happened on April 20th, 2010

April 20th, 2010

4 + 20 +2+0+1+0 = 27 = the lesson of the oil spill]

What he must do/has to do = TR = 29 = Skills.  Talents.  Competence.  Expertise.  Specialty.  Combine.  Teamwork.  Cooperation.  Collaborate.  Collaboration.  Consult.  Consultant.  Cooperate.  There’s no “I” in team.  TEAM:  together each accomplishes more.  Consult an expert.    

[His synastry with President Barack Obama is worth noting.  August 4th, 1961 (8 + 4 +1+9+6+1 = 29 = Barack Obama’s life lesson)]

How he obtains his heart’s desire = TD = 24 = Clean up your act.  Getting cleaned up.  Pure and natural.  Taking charge.  Who’s in charge here?  I’m in charge.  The power behind the throne.  Take the vow.  Ruling the roost.  Ruling with an iron fist.

  

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Nearly 50 miles offshore at the big oil rig floating on a glassy-calm sea, a helicopter landed early on the morning of April 20, carrying four executives from BP, the oil company. The men were visiting the Deepwater Horizon to help honor the crew for its standout safety record.

The rig workers were buzzing for another reason. They were nearly done with the latest job. It had been a little tricky, but it was nothing they could not handle.

As night fell, Micah Joseph Sandell, 40, was in the small cab of his crane, three stories above the bustling deck. Two floors down from the helipad, men in red coveralls waited for dinner in a hall lined with gold safety plaques. Eugene Dewayne Moss, a 37-year-old crane operator, realized he needed to tear himself away from a movie to get ready for his overnight shift.

“I thought, Oh man, I’ve got to go,” Mr. Moss recalled. “I got up, turned my TV off.”

Seconds later, a thundering explosion rocked the rig, the beginning of a terrifying night for the men who would survive one of the most harrowing disasters in the history of the oil business.

All over the ship, men snapped into action. Sleeping workers leapt from their beds. Then came a second explosion, even louder than the first. They later struggled to describe it — a tornado of fire, a nuclear bomb, a jet engine exploding. But a half-dozen rig workers interviewed this week all agreed on one thing, recalling that moment: “We all were sure we were going to die,” said Dennis Dewayne Martinez, 30, a supervisor on the rig.

The Deepwater Horizon was one of the most sophisticated drilling rigs on the planet.

Commissioned in 2001, the ship, 396 feet from stem to stern, could park in the water, lock onto satellites to measure an exact position and shoot water out of a series of thrusters to maintain that position. Even with waves crashing against the keel, the rig could steady itself for the precision work of sending drill pipes more than six miles down, dead straight, through the ocean floor and deep into the earth’s crust.

Only the year before, the Horizon had set a world record by punching through 35,000 feet of water and rock — nearly seven miles — in the Gulf of Mexico, creating a well called Tiber for BP, the oil giant once known as British Petroleum.

This time, the Horizon was drilling an exploratory well about 47 miles off the Louisiana coast, in a stretch of the sea floor known as Mississippi Canyon Block 252. BP and some partners had paid the federal government $34 million for the lease, and the Horizon crew had celebrated when they found oil there.

But the Horizon was a drill ship, not a production vessel, so the workers had been told to cap the well for later use and move on to the next job.

Up on the bridge that April night, the officers were keeping close watch on the Damon B. Bankston, a 260-foot cargo ship that was pumping special drilling mud through a hose from the rig.

The job of sinking the well had gone relatively smoothly — extending the well, pipe by pipe, until it punched through to the oil below. Then the crew shoved a final long stretch of pipe deep into the reservoir.

Trouble With Gas Buildup

As the job unfolded, however, the workers did have intermittent trouble with pockets of natural gas. Highly flammable, the gas was forcing its way up the drilling pipes.

This was something BP had not foreseen as a serious problem, declaring a year earlier that gas was likely to pose only a “negligible” risk. The government warned the company that gas buildup was a real concern and that BP should “exercise caution.”

At one point during the previous several weeks, so much of it came belching up to the surface that a loudspeaker announcement called for a halt to all “hot work,” meaning any smoking, welding, cooking or any other use of fire. Smaller belches, or “kicks,” had stalled work as the job was winding down.

By mid-April, the crew was in the mop-up stages of the operation. The day before the blast, workers from Halliburton, the oil services contractor, had finished one of the trickiest tasks in building a well: encasing it in cement, with a temporary plug of cement near the bottom of the pipe to seal the well.

The Halliburton workers used a less common technique for the cement, whipping nitrogen gas into it to create a kind of mousse. This type of cement, if used correctly, forms a tighter seal, but it is trickier to handle.

Still, all in all, it had been a pretty routine job for the Horizon.

“Almost there,” said one supervisor as he left the 11 a.m. daily meeting on April 20. “We’re almost done, baby!”

Some of the men had heard they might even get a bonus for finishing ahead of deadline.

Explosive Fury

It happened so fast.

Just before 10 p.m., the crew was using seawater to flush drilling mud out of the pipes. Suddenly, with explosive fury, water and mud came hurtling up the pipes and onto the deck, followed by the ominous hiss of natural gas. In seconds, it touched some spark or flame.

“I took off running,” Mr. Sandell said. “How, I can’t tell you.”

He joined the other men in a sprint to the two lifeboats on the rig’s bow. Men were climbing over one another to get inside the covered lifeboats, which look like capsules and can hold up to 50 men each.

The assistant driller who was supposed to take muster — or roll call — panicked. Instead, he handed Mr. Martinez the clipboard before climbing into a lifeboat.

“Hurry up!” the men already in the boats screamed. “Lower the lifeboat!”

Mr. Martinez said they needed to wait for others. The men in the boats yelled that there was no more time — the 242-foot steel tower in the center of the rig was engulfed in flames. They were certain it was going to fall their way.

In one lifeboat, a worker lay on the deck, trying to stanch the blood flowing from a deep gash in his neck. Others tried to rub the insulation from their eyes, after the walls of their cabins collapsed. Still others were caked in the clay-brown mud that had shot out of the well after the first explosion.

Most of the men had on bright orange life jackets. Some men, having been thrown from their bunks, wore little else.

Not everyone could get to the boats. Through a porthole, Mr. Moss watched as some co-workers — black silhouettes against the flames — jumped from the rig. “You can’t see them good enough to tell if they had life jackets on or anything,” he said.

Within 10 minutes, the two lifeboats closed their doors and dropped about 100 feet down to the water below.

A small boat was nearby. Albert Andry III, a recreational fisherman, and his buddies were bobbing near the rig, trying to catch the fish that schooled near it.

When Mr. Andry — who was contacted by a reporter after he posted an account of his experience on the Internet — noticed water gushing from the center of the rig, one of his friends, who had worked on rigs, knew something was wrong.

“Go! Go! Go! Go! Gooooo!” the friend yelled. Mr. Andry opened his throttle wide, covering 100 yards or so before the rig exploded.

“The rig blew a few more explosions after that and began to burn down,” he wrote later on a Web message board, where he also posted photos and videos of the scene. “Some of the rig began dripping into the water and the platform tilted in and turned RED HOT.”

From their lifeboats, the Horizon crew radioed for help. The Bankston, the cargo boat that was attached to the rig when the blowout began, had managed to pull away, and now the captain was pulling survivors off the lifeboats.

Frantic emergency calls summoned planes, helicopters and Coast Guard fireboats to the stricken rig.

Radio Silence

On the Bankston, the men cried. They prayed. Nobody talked much as they watched the orange tongues of flame from the Horizon lick the sky, reflecting off the still water.

The men were kept aboard the rescue ship, in the middle of the ocean, for a full 12 hours. Worse than the wait, they said, was being forbidden to call their families. The men were told that the Coast Guard wanted to conduct interviews before the workers spoke to family or anyone else.

Rumors spread that the BP executives who had visited the rig were up on the Bankston’s bridge using the ship’s radio or a satellite phone to call home.

Helicopters thwocked overhead. Boats darted around the rig searching for survivors. Word soon came that 11 were missing. (Of the 126 on board at the time of the disaster, 115 survived, of whom 17 were injured.)

As he watched the hulking rig, his home for much of the past eight years, slowly tilt and falter, Mr. Martinez thought about his father’s ring. The only time he ever took the ring off was when he was working. It was now headed to the bottom of the sea.

“I lost my daddy when I was 23, he was 46,” he said.

Another worker, startled by a memory, jammed his hand into his pocket. He pulled out a small photograph of his son. He caught his breath, stared at it, then exhaled.

Finally, the Bankston started its 12-hour journey back to shore. It stopped on the way to pick up a couple of medics from another rig. At a second stop, it picked up Coast Guard officials, who immediately began passing out forms for the men to fill out and to describe what they saw. Some were pulled aside for interviews.

Some relief arrived: blankets, and for supper, pork chops and hot dogs.

Conversation followed, but mostly they just traded questions. What could possibly have gone so horribly wrong? If the cement job worked, how had gas leaked up the pipe and sparked? Others wondered about a device on the sea floor called a blowout preventer and why it did not seem to have activated.

Pulling in to Port Fourchon, the men fell silent again.

“To me it all felt like a nightmare,” Mr. Sandell said. “And I still wasn’t sure if I was awake.”

As he and others climbed off the Bankston, they were greeted by several Coast Guard and company officials sitting around a table stacked with forms.

Behind the table was a row of portable toilets. And as the crew members approached, each was handed a cup for a mandatory drug test. The search for an explanation would begin with them. That search continues.

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/08/us/08rig.html?pagewanted=1&src=me

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Merger Amoco and BP into BP Amoco on 31 December 1998.

from:  http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=16003336&contentId=7022481#7078619

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

BP

27

BP’s primary challenge = BP = 27 = Initiative.  Follow through.  Original.  The first.  Innovation.  Trailblazer.  Pioneer.  Inventor.  Start.  Begin.  Initiate.  Groundbreaking.  Drill.  Drilling.  New start.  Fresh start.  First step.  The beginning.  Reset.  Restart.

  

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Tony Hayward - World Economic Forum on the Middle East 2008.jpg 

Tony Hayward

2          7

the most important thing he can do = TY = 27 = Initiative.  Follow through.  Original.  The first.  Innovation.  Trailblazer.  Pioneer.  Inventor.  Start.  Begin.  Initiate.  Groundbreaking.  Drill.  Drilling.  New start.  Fresh start.  First step.  The beginning.  Reset.  Restart.  

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A portrait shot of a serious looking middle-aged African-American male looking straight ahead. He has short black hair, and is wearing a dark navy blazer with a blue striped tie over a light blue collared shirt. In the background are two flags hanging from separate flagpoles: an American flag, and one from the Executive Office of the President.

Barack Obama was born on August 4th, 1961

source:  http://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Obama%2C_Barack

August 4th

8 + 4 +2+0+0+9 = 23 = his personal year (from August 4th, 2009 to August 4th, 2010)

23 year + 4 (April) = 27 = his personal month (from April 4th, 2010 to May 4th, 2010) = Initiative.  Follow through.  Original.  The first.  Innovation.  Trailblazer.  Pioneer.  Inventor.  Start.  Begin.  Initiate.  Groundbreaking.  Drill.  Drilling.  New start.  Fresh start.  First step.  The beginning.  Reset.  Restart.  

27 month + 20 (20th of the month on April 20th, 2010) = 47 = his personal day = The future.  Tomorrow.  Famous.  Name & fame.  Notoriety.  Name recognition.  (Inter)nationally known.  High profile.  VIP.  Well-known.  Household name.  Public life.  Limelight.  Legendary.  Notable.  Noteworthy. 

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April 20th, 2010

4 + 20 +2+0+1+0 = 27 = the life lesson and personal year for the oil spill = Initiative.  Follow through.  Original.  The first.  Innovation.  Trailblazer.  Pioneer.  Inventor.  Start.  Begin.  Initiate.  Groundbreaking.  Drill.  Drilling.  New start.  Fresh start.  First step.  The beginning.  Reset.  Restart.  

27 + 4 (April) = 31 = the personal month for the oil spill (from April 20th, 2010 to May 20th, 2010) = Scramble.  Stir.  Catalyst.  Reaction.  Risk.  Controversy.  Provoke.  Instigate.  Ruckus.  Noise.  Dissonance.  Disturbance.  Strife.  Squabbles.  Quarrels.  Antagonism.  Agitation.  Rowdy.  Wild.  Troublemaker.  Scandal. 

31 month + 20 (20th of the month on April 20th, 2010) = 51 = the personal day for the oil spill = Legislation.  Laws.  Rules.  Regulations.  Ordinance.  Policy.  Standards.  Important.  Official.  Government.  Congress.  President.  Lawyers.  Attorneys.  Legal advice.  Counsel.  Litigation.  Lawsuit. 

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BP was born on December 31st, 1998

December 31

12 + 31 +2+0+0+9 = 54 = BP’s personal year (from December 31st, 2009 to December 31st, 2010)

54 year + 4 (April) = 58 = BP’s personal month for May 2010 = Overworked.  Overtime.  Civil unrest.  Banishment.  Exile.  Ostracize.  Enforced isolation.  Shunning.   

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