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Archive for the ‘2011 kidnappings’ Category

January 25, 2012         8:09 a.m.

U.S. officials on Wednesday were providing some new details on the dramatic helicopter rescue of an American aid worker and her Danish colleague in Somalia.

The Pentagon released a statement Wednesday morning on the U.S. military’s rescue, saying that Jessica Buchanan, 32, and Poul Hagen Thisted, 60, were not hurt in the operation.

The Pentagon also said there were no injuries to any of the U.S. troops involved. It also noted that the FBI was involved in the rescue.

Video: US military frees hostages in Somalia

 The commandos that carried out the operation were drawn from the same Navy SEAL team involved in the mission that killed Osama bin Laden, according to the Associated Press. [Updated 9:31 a.m.Jan. 25: A U.S. official confirmed to The Times that the rescue was carried out by SEAL Team 6.]

Nine Somali hostage-takers were killed in the operation, and five others were wounded, witnesses in Somalia told the Los Angeles Times. [Updated 9:31 a.m. Jan. 25: A U.S. official said the raid occurred in the village of Hiimo Gaabo, south of Galkayo, where Buchanan and Thisted had been kidnapped by a gang of gunmen last October.]

Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta said in a statement that the rescued aid workers were “transported to safe location, where we will evaluate their health and make arrangements for them to return home.”

[Updated 9:31 a.m. Jan. 25: The team parachuted into the vicinity of the camp where the two hostages were being held and carried out the assault, the officials said.

The Pentagon decided to move after recently receiving intelligence on Buchanan and Thisted’s location. The decision to carry out the rescue now was made in part because of concerns that Buchanan’s health might have been deteriorating, the officials said.

“We had indications that she had health issues when they were kidnapped and that certainly contributed to the sense of urgency,” the officials said.]

Buchanan and Thisted, both from the Danish Demining Group, had been kidnapped in October in the central Somali town of Galkayo, which until then had been considered relatively safe for Westerners.

The pre-dawn raid was carried out by U.S. military helicopters and Navy SEALs operating out of an American base in the tiny East African nation of Djibouti, U.S. officials said. Witnesses said the operation took place after 2 a.m. local time and lasted about 15 minutes.

After the mission, officials said, the SEALs flew Buchanan and Thisted to the Djibouti base, Camp Lemonnier, where about 2,500 U.S. personnel are stationed.

[Updated 9:31 a.m. Jan. 25: The kidnappers were not believed to have ties to Al Shabab, the Somali militant group linked to Al Qaeda, or to have been pirates.  U.S. officials believe they were interested in receiving ransom for the two Western prisoners.]

President Obama appeared to refer to the mission just before the State of the Union address Tuesday night when he pointed at Panetta, and said, “Good job tonight. Good job.”

In a statement early Wednesday, the president praised the SEALs for their courage and warned that the U.S. would not tolerate kidnappings of Americans.

“As commander in chief, I could not be prouder of the troops who carried out this mission, and the dedicated professionals who supported their efforts,” he said.

“Jessica Buchanan was selflessly serving her fellow human beings when she was taken hostage by criminals and pirates who showed no regard for her health and well-being.

“The United States will not tolerate the abduction of our people, and will spare no effort to secure the safety of our citizens and to bring their captors to justice.”

Obama said that in a telephone conversation with Buchanan’s father Monday night he “told him that all Americans have Jessica in our thoughts and prayers” and that she “will soon be reunited with her family.”

The October kidnapping was one of a series of abductions by Somali pirates in a bid to extort high ransoms, with Westerners fetching the highest prices. Several kidnappings occurred late last year in Kenya, Somalia’s southern neighbor, triggering a Kenyan invasion in a bid to restore a stable government, an effort that continues to this day.

The U.S. has built up its military presence around Somalia in recent years, deploying surveillance drones, special operations units and ships off the coast, as part of a strategy to keep tabs on militants in the lawless country and pirates who regularly hijack ships off its coast.

U.S. officials are especially worried about Al Shabab, an Islamic militant group with ties to Al Qaeda that has taken control of large parts of southern Somalia. The group has often threatened Western aid groups in Somalia, though it has also allowed some organizations to provide assistance over the last year as famine afflicted the country.

from:  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2012/01/somalia-rescue-hostages-pirates.html

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Jessica Buchanan

1511931 23381515         49

 

her path of destiny = 49 = Wish come true.

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Poul Hagen Thisted

7                          4

 

how he obtains/loses his heart’s desire = PD = 74 = Generosity.  Charity work.

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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PHOTO: American Man Abducted in Eastern Pakistan

Pakistani police officers gather at the entry gate of the house of an abducted American citizen in Lahore, Pakistan on Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011.
 

Gunmen kidnapped an American development expert after tricking his guards and breaking into his house in Pakistan on Saturday, a brazen raid that alarmed aid workers, diplomats and other foreigners who already tread carefully in this country rife with Islamic militancy and anti-U.S. sentiment.

The U.S. Embassy identified the victim as Warren Weinstein. Weinstein is the Pakistan country director for J.E. Austin Associates, a development contractor that has received millions of dollars from the aid arm of the U.S. government, according to a profile on LinkedIn, a networking website.

Police declined to speculate on the motive, and no group immediately claimed responsibility. But kidnappings for ransom are common in Pakistan, with foreigners being occasional targets. Criminal gangs are suspected in most abductions, but Islamic militants, are believed to also use the tactic to raise money.

Lahore has seen a number of militant attacks, and the Punjab region where it is located is home to several of Pakistan’s top militant networks, some of which are suspected of ties to Pakistani intelligence.

Police said the American, believed to be in his 60s, had returned to his home in the eastern city of Lahore the previous night from the capital, Islamabad. He had told his staff that would be wrapping up his latest project and moving out of Pakistan by Monday, police officer Tajammal Hussain said.

According to Pakistani police, two of the kidnappers showed up at Weinstein’s house Saturday and told the guards inside the gate of the walled compound that they wanted to give them food, an act of sharing common during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, which started early this month.

The guards opened the gate, and five other men suddenly appeared. The armed assailants overpowered the guards and stormed into the house. Some gunmen are believed to have entered through the back. They snatched the American from his bedroom but took nothing else.

Security forces were checking vehicles in and around Lahore in hopes of finding Weinstein, said Ghulam Mahmood Dogar, a top police official.

In Washington, the State Department said it was in touch with Weinstein’s family and that U.S. officials in Pakistan were working with local authorities on the case. Spokeswoman Joanne Moore would not comment further, citing privacy concerns.

Weinstein headed a program trying to strengthen the competitiveness of Pakistani industries, according to the biographical section of his company’s website, which was taken down late Saturday. The LinkedIn profile says Weinstein has been in Pakistan for seven years.

Calls to the company headquarters in Virginia were not immediately answered, but its website describes Weinstein as a development expert with 25 years experience and a Ph.D. in international law and economics.

“He’s a short, funny man with a quick wit,” said Raza Rumi, a Pakistani columnist who said the American could speak a fair amount of Urdu. “He’s a very laid-back guy, not too worried about security issues, not really paranoid at all.”

The audacious nature of Saturday’s abduction raised the likelihood that diplomatic missions, aid groups and contracting companies would further tighten security. Already, many groups severely restrict where their international staff can travel because of kidnapping fears.

The security concerns heavily impact U.S. aid programs and have served to slow down the disbursement of billions of dollars in promised funds because they limit where American diplomats are allowed to go and what projects can be undertaken safely.

Americans in Pakistan are considered especially at risk because militants oppose Islamabad’s alliance with Washington and the war in Afghanistan. The unilateral U.S. raid that killed al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden on May 2 in northwest Pakistan only added to tensions between the two countries.

“They’ve become very, very brazen,” Zahid Elahi, managing director in Pakistan for Development Alternatives Inc., another U.S.-based contracting firm, said of the kidnappers. “We just need to get our heads together because it’s only just happened.”

He said he would definitely advise international colleagues to lay low in the coming days.

A Western aid worker said the raid on Weinstein’s home is “a new wrinkle.” He called it especially worrying because companies such as J.E. Austin Associates tend to spend a great deal on security for their staff, even more than many humanitarian groups.

“They really, really are risk averse,” the aid worker said, speaking on condition of anonymity because of security concerns.

Several other foreigners have been abducted in Pakistan in recent years.

John Solecki, an American with the U.N.’s refugee agency in southwest Baluchistan, was held captive by ethnic Baluchi separatists for more than two months in early 2009. A 5-year-old British boy, Sahil Saeed Naqqash, was kidnapped for two weeks from his grandparents’ house in central Pakistan in March 2010.

The Pakistani Taliban claim to be holding a Swiss man and woman kidnapped earlier this summer from Baluchistan. The militant group, which is based in the northwest tribal belt bordering Afghanistan, says it will free the pair if the U.S. releases a Pakistani woman convicted of trying to kill Americans.

The U.S. State Department recently issued a travel warning for its citizens saying that American diplomats are facing increased harassment and they, along with aid workers and journalists, have been falsely identified as spies in the local media.

U.S. citizens also have come under greater scrutiny by the Pakistani government this year, especially since January, when an American CIA contractor shot to death two Pakistanis he said were trying to rob him in Lahore.

American lawmakers and officials have made a slew of trips in recent weeks to try to maintain the relationship with Islamabad.

On Saturday, U.S. Sen. John McCain arrived in Islamabad and met with top officials including Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani and President Asif Ali Zardari. In statements afterward, Gilani and Zardari said Pakistan desires an enduring, multidimensional partnership with the United States.

from:  http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory?id=14296412

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

Warren Weinstein

519955 559512595        80

 

his path of destiny = 80 = Dealing with the aftermath.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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Taliban fighters during a patrol in Ghazni province on 23 January 2010
27 February 2011 Last updated at 15:52 ET

A Canadian national is missing in Afghanistan, Canadian officials have said.

A spokeswoman for the department of foreign affairs in Ottawa said the man – named as Colin Rutherford – had travelled to Afghanistan as a tourist.

The confirmation followed a statement by the Taliban saying they had captured someone from Canada.

The Taliban said they had detained the man in Ghazni province, south-west of the capital Kabul, for spying.

A spokesman said he was still being held and that “documents in his possession revealed his clandestine intelligence activities”. The statement said the Taliban would soon release a video of him.

Two French television journalists were kidnapped by the Taliban north-east of Kabul more than a year ago and are still being held.

from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-12592860

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Canada’s Department of Foreign Affairs confirmed Sunday that a Canadian national has gone missing in Afghanistan while visiting the war-torn south Asian country as a tourist.A spokeswoman for the department of foreign affairs in Ottawa identified the missing man as 27-year-old Canadian traveler Colin Rutherford, adding that Canadian government was working with the Afghan authorities to trace him.

The Canadian response came after the Taliban claimed that it had captured a Canadian national in the province of Ghazni, accusing him of being a spy sent by Canadian authorities to discover the hideouts of “Afghan mujahedeen” in the region.

A Taliban spokesman said in a statement that the documents found to be in possession of the captured Canadian “revealed his clandestine intelligence activities”. The insurgent group also said it planned to release a video of the hostage soon.

However, the Canadian foreign affairs spokeswoman on Sunday rejected the Taliban group’s claims, insisting that Rutherford had visited Afghanistan as a tourist with the intention of learning the local Pashto language. But she did not mention when Rutherford was first reported to be missing.

Such kidnappings of foreign nations are common in Afghanistan, where the west-backed government under President Hamid Karzai is struggling to contain a resurgent Taliban insurgency. Two French nationals abducted by the Taliban north-east of Kabul are still being held by their captors.

from:  http://www.rttnews.com/Content/GeneralNews.aspx?Id=1563053&SM=1

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Each letter of the first name rules 9 years of life.  Ages 27 to 54 are ruled by the 4th, 5th, and 6th letters of the first name.

Colin Rutherford

9 ( i is the 9th letter of the alphabet) + 14 (n is the 14th letter of the alphabet) + 3 (C is the 3rd letter of the alphabet) = 26

[Because the first name Colin only has 5 letters, you start over with the first letter of the first name (C) as the “6th” letter.]

So from ages twenty-seven to fifty-four he has the number 26 going on.

26 = Photos.  Media.  In the news.

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