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Archive for the ‘Mikhail Prokhorov’ Category

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December 12, 2011

Amid a crescendo of complaints from Russians fed up with the country’s tightly controlled political system, two prominent figures — a billionaire industrialist and the recently ousted finance minister — sought to fill a void in the opposition leadership on Monday.

The billionaire, Mikhail D. Prokhorov, who owns shares in a major gold mining company and an array of other ventures in Russia as well as the New Jersey Nets basketball franchise in the United States, said he would run for president, challenging Prime Minister Vladimir V. Putin.

“I made a decision, probably the most serious decision in my life: I am going to the presidential election,” Mr. Prohkorov said at a news conference. He has barely appeared in public since mid-September, when he was removed as the head of a pro-business party, Just Cause, after clashing with Kremlin political strategists.

“You may remember, the Kremlin removed me and my allies from Just Cause, and we were not allowed to do what we wanted,” he said. “It is not in my nature to stop halfway. So for the last two and a half months we sat and worked, very calmly and quietly, and we created all the infrastructure to collect two million signatures,” the number needed to get on the ballot as an independent candidate.

Meanwhile, the former finance minister, Aleksei L. Kudrin, said he would form a new political party to push for liberal reforms. Like Mr. Prokhorov, Mr. Kudrin was expelled from the Kremlin’s inner circle this fall, after disagreeing publicly with Mr. Putin’s decision to trade jobs with President Dmitri A. Medvedev.

Mr. Kudrin told the business newspaper Vedomosti that the governing party, United Russia, had not delivered on its promises to protect business, fight corruption and reform the court system, and would be hard-pressed to respond to the complaints emerging from society.

“While they are gathering their thoughts, they are losing time, which is very valuable right now,” he said. “In parallel, there will arise a new liberal party, which will talk about these problems. This party will include people with experience, people from business. The political picture will begin to gradually change.” He said he was “absolutely certain” that the party would be created, though he offered no details.

Their return to the political arena Monday posed the latest in a series of challenges in recent days to the political status quo after years of stasis.

Mr. Prokhorov said the events of the last week, including a huge rally on Saturday that drew tens of thousands of people in protest of parliamentary election results, have left the governing powers no choice but to loosen their grip.

“I think that our society is waking up, and that part of the government which is not capable of establishing a dialogue with society, those authorities will have to go,” he said. “The world is undergoing serious changes, a new kind of person has arisen as the result of the internet, and communication between the authorities and society will have a more honest character.”

Many changes seem likely to flow from Dec. 4 parliamentary elections, which were condemned as fraudulent by international and local monitors, and protested by a vehement swath of middle-class Russians.

United Russia, which is led by Mr. Putin, finished first in the elections, with a shade under 50 percent of the vote, but still lost 77 seats.

Critics say those losses would have been far steeper were it not for voting irregularities, including structural impediments that make it difficult for opposition parties to compete — like the use of official government resources on behalf of United Russia — and also outright fraud like ballot-box stuffing.

At least one nationwide exit poll suggested that United Russia most likely won only about 43 percent of the vote, or more than 6 percent less than the official tally.

Complaints began mounting during the campaign, when digitally-connected young citizens, taking matters into the own hands, circulated videos showing local and regional authorities threatening or cajoling their subordinates to get out the vote for United Russia, the governing party, which is led by Mr. Putin.

Similar videos of malfeasance at polling stations, some taken using cellphones, were posted on the Internet.

The outcry culminated on Saturday, when upward of 40,000 protesters gathered near the Kremlin for a rally that was permitted by city authorities. A huge deployment of riot police and heavy equipment stood by as the crowd chanted slogans against Mr. Putin and denounced the election results as invalid. Some speakers demanded that the elections be annulled and a new vote scheduled.

Mr. Medvedev has ordered inquiries into alleged fraud but there is widespread skepticism that such an investigation would alter the outcome. And on Monday, Mr. Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, said as much, telling Agence France-Presse, “even if you take into account the so-called evidence” of fraud, “this accounts for just over 0.5 percent of all the votes.”

The wave of dissent has included complaints from the three minority parties represented in the Parliament, all of which picked up additional seats in the balloting. But the parties have been at odds over how to respond, and in some cases there has been internal dissent within their own ranks.

At least one member of Parliament, Gennadi Gudkov, of Just Russia, a liberal socialist party, has urged that his group reach an agreement with the Communist Party, which finished second in the balloting, and the nationalist Liberal Democratic Party, which finished fourth, to refuse their seats in the new Parliament and force a new vote.

The Communist Party has declared the election results “illegitimate both from the moral and political points of view” and said that they showed a “heavy defeat of the ruling regime.” The party has also called for the ouster of Russia’s top elections official, Vladimir Churov, who is a strong supporter of Mr. Putin.

But so far the Communists have said they will not decline their seats unless United Russia first gives up theirs. Meanwhile, the nationalists have distanced themselves from the other opposition parties, even declining to attend Saturday’s big rally, which they said was instigated by foreign agents.

Even the leader of Just Russia, Sergei Mironov, who is also running for president, said he opposed declining the parliamentary seats out of concern that under Russian election law they would simply be awarded to United Russia, which fielded enough candidates to fill all 450 seats in the Duma, the lower house.

Other opposition organizers have argued against tossing out the election results in favor of forcing a recount in districts where there was evidence of fraud, which they said would most likely result in United Russia losing more seats, perhaps enough for it to fall short of the simple majority needed to pass legislation.

It was into this swirl of dissenting voices and lack of coherent leadership that the announcements came on Monday from Mr. Kudrin and Mr. Prokhorov.

For Mr. Prokhorov, whose business interests include a stake in the Atlantic Yardsdevelopment in downtown Brooklyn, his leap into presidential politics could be risky. He is the first wealthy businessman to pursue a political goal in Russia against the governing authorities since the 2003 arrest of Mikhail B. Khodorkovsky, the former chairman of the Yukos Oil Company, who was jailed after he began financing an opposition party. He remains in prison.

The Kremlin is clearly considering blessing a liberal party, after the backlash that has emerged in recent days.

In an interview posted Tuesday on the Web site of Ekho Moskvy radio station, Kremlin strategist Vladislav Y. Surkov said he supported the creation of “a mass liberal party or, more precisely, a party for the annoyed urban communities,” and that in order for Russia’s political system to survive, it needed to open up to “new players.”

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/13/world/europe/billionaire-to-oppose-putin-in-russian-presidential-election.html

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Mikhail Prokhorov was born on May 3rd, 1965 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Prokhorov

May 3rd, 1965

May 3rd

5 + 3 +2+0+1+1 = 12 = his personal year (from May 3rd, 2011 to May 2nd, 2012) = Different.  Having faith.  Wait and see.  Reversals.

12 year + 12 (December) = 24 = his personal month (from December 3rd, 2011 to January 2nd, 2012) = Russia.  Taking charge.

24 month + 12 (12th of the month on Monday December  12th, 2011) = 36 = his personal day = Having his work cut out for him.  Herculean task.

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The 2012 Russian presidential elections are to be held on Sunday March 4th, 2012 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_presidential_election,_2012

Sunday March 4th, 2012

May 3rd, 1965

May 3rd

5 + 3 +2+0+1+1 = 12 = his personal year (from May 3rd, 2011 to May 2nd, 2012) = Different.  Having faith.  Wait and see.  Reversals.

12 year + 3 (March) = 15 = his personal month (from March 3rd, 2012 to April 2nd, 2012) = Taxes.  Spending.

15 month + 4 (4th of the month on Sunday March 4th, 2012) = 19 = his personal day = Proud of his hard earned success.  Sunshine is the best disinfectant.

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Aleksei Kudrin was born on October 12th, 1960 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksey_Kudrin

October 12th, 1960

October 12th

10 + 12 +2+0+1+1 = 26 = his personal year (from October 12th, 2011 to October 11th, 2012) = Popular.  Speeches.  Television.  In the news.  Making headlines.

26 year + 12 (December) = 38 = his personal month (from December 12th, 2011 to January 11th, 2012) = I care.  Take care of yourself.

38 month + 12 (12th of the month on Monday December 12th, 2011) = 50 = his personal day = Society.  Population.  Everybody.

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The 2012 Russian presidential elections are to be held on Sunday March 4th, 2012 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_presidential_election,_2012

Sunday March 4th, 2012

October 12th, 1960

October 12th

10 + 12 +2+0+1+1 = 26 = his personal year (from October 12th, 2011 to October 11th, 2012) = Popular.  Speeches.  Television.  In the news.  Making headlines.

26 year + 2 (February) = 28 = his personal month (from February 12th, 2012 to March 11th, 2012) = Bold.  Daring.

28 month + 4 (4th of the month on Sunday March 4th, 2012) = 32 = his personal day = Freedom.  Liberty.  Democracy.  Mainstream.  Victory.

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The 2012 Russian presidential elections are to be held on Sunday March 4th, 2012 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_presidential_election,_2012

Vladimir Putin was born on October 7th, 1952 at 9:30 a.m. in St. Petersburg, Russia according to http://www.astro.com/astro-databank/Putin,_Vladimir

October 7th, 1952

October 7th

10 + 7 +2+0+1+1 = 21 = his personal year (from October 7th, 2011 to October 6th, 2012) = On the world stage.  For all the world to see.  Seeing the big picture.

21 year + 2 (February) = 23 = his personal month (from February 7th, 2012 to March 6th, 2012) = Leadership.  Taking action.

23 month + 4 (4th of the month on Sunday March 4th, 2012) = 27 = his personal day = First.  Uncharacteristic.  Acting out of character.

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May 12, 2010, 8:00AM

He’s a 45-year-old billionaire from the other side of the planet, and he has virtually nothing in common with those who will invest their emotions and disposable income in his new business next year.

But already, Mikhail Prokhorov is working on his populist rhetoric:

“For those who are already fans of the Nets and the NBA,” Prokhorov proclaimed in a statement Tuesday, “I intend to give you plenty to cheer about.”

The Russian oligarch received official approval from the NBA Board of Governors to purchase controlling ownership in the team Tuesday, setting the stage for the official closing of the transaction today.

Then, presumably, there will be something to cheer about — notably, the reawakening of a franchise that had pinched every penny under owner Bruce Ratner the last few seasons.

“We are pleased that the NBA’s Board of Governors approved Mikhail Prokhorov’s purchase of majority ownership of the Nets, welcoming into the NBA ownership ranks the league’s first majority investor from outside of North America,” commissioner David Stern said.

“We anticipate that his passion for the game and business acumen will be of considerable value not only to the Nets franchise but to the entire NBA.”

With interests that include metals, banking, electric vehicles, media and real estate, Prokhorov is worth an estimated $13.4 billion, making him the second-richest NBA owner behind Portland’s Paul Allen. And though he had a reputation for being less intrusive than most owners during his time with CSKA Moscow — a two-time European champion — he will have to make several important decisions almost immediately.

As they make plans to move in Newark for at least two years, the Nets are facing perhaps the busiest offseason in their history, following the 12-70 debacle of 2009-10.

For starters, Prokhorov is expected to give team president Rod Thorn a contract extension sometime next week. That will be followed by the NBA Draft Lottery Tuesday in Secaucus — where Prokhorov himself will probably represent the team — and a free-agent market in which the Nets will have at least $26 million to spend on new players.

And with few exceptions, the best NBA owners spend. That’s one lesson Ratner learned too late, as his tight purse strings made him a pariah for fans who blamed him for allowing Kenyon Martin to leave via free agency. Though that decision showed astute foresight, the 65-year-old developer blamed it on his lack of experience.

His successor comes better prepared, and Ratner said Monday that “Mikhail and his team will bring tremendous innovation and excitement to the NBA. He has a love for basketball and a commitment to excellence.” 

from:  http://www.nj.com/nets/index.ssf/2010/05/new_nets_owner_mikhail_prokhor.html

Mikhail Prokhorov was born on May 3rd, 1965 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Prokhorov

May 3rd

5 + 3 +2+0+1+0 = 11 = his personal year (from May 3rd, 2010 to May 2nd, 2011)

11 year + 5 (May) = 16 = his personal month (from May 3rd, 2010 to May 2nd, 2011) = Astonishment.  Astounding.  Spectacular.  Amazing.  Amazement.  Speechless.  Unprecedented.  Surpass.  Exceed.  Transcend.  Powerful speaker.  Powerful voice. 

16 month + 11 (11th of the month on Tuesday May 11th, 2010) =  Initiative.  Follow through.  Original.  The first.  Innovation.  Trailblazer.  Pioneer.  Inventor.  Start.  Begin.  Initiate.  New start.  Fresh start.  First step.  The beginning. 

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