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Archive for the ‘Jonathan Quick’ Category

The defending Stanley Cup champion Los Angeles Kings, behind center Mike Richards (10) and goalie Jonathan Quick (32), have gotten off to a slow start this season.

February 08. 2013               4:00AM PST

They made up three teams of the NHL’s version of the final four last season.

This season, the Los Angeles Kings, New York Rangers and Phoenix Coyotes are playing like teams that won’t get to enjoy the final round of the conference playoffs. All three teams have failed to build on their postseason runs of a year ago — and sky-high preseason expectations. The Kings, the defending Stanley Cup champions, and the Rangers won’t even make the playoffs at this rate. And amid complicated ownership issues, the Coyotes are just hanging on.

In this lockout-shortened season, where slow starts could prove costly, all three are in a rush to recapture what made them so special last May.

This trio of underachievers has company when it comes to slow-starting teams, however. The Minnesota Wild, Philadelphia Flyers, Washington Capitals and Detroit Red Wings are all among a group lacking that extra spark. And just like that, folks, 20 percent of the season is already in the books.

But it’s the Kings, Coyotes and Rangers that are the most puzzling. They should all have that fire to get back to where they were.

After all, the Eastern Conference-champion New Jersey Devils — the other team from the 2012 final four — are fourth in the East and are only a point behind Pittsburgh for the top spot in the Atlantic Division after Thursday’s games.

So it’s not like there has to be a postseason hangover. But whatever the Devils (6-1-3) have right now, the Rangers (5-5), Kings (3-4-2) and Coyotes (4-5-2) simply don’t.

Let’s start in New York.

The Rangers can probably forget about earning the top seed in the conference for the second straight season. New York has little depth and no scoring punch outside of the top line. The Rangers frontloaded that first line — Marian Gaborik, Brad Richards and Rick Nash — and that’s worked. They’ve combined for 10 goals and 24 points. It’s the rest of the team that’s struggled. All the young players who were supposed to be dynamite on the second line, like Carl Hagelin and Chris Kreider, have been anything but. That’s the price the Rangers have paid for dealing several “depth” players like they did to get Nash. The Rangers have scored 24 goals, the lowest total in the East.

Goaltender Henrik Lundqvist can’t save ’em all for New York.

“We have some guys that are really playing hard,” Rangers coach John Tortorella said, “and we’ve got some guys that look scared and tentative.”

Kreider scored the only goal for the Rangers in a 3-1 loss to New Jersey on Tuesday night. Tortorella said changes could be coming, notably on the special teams unit where the Rangers are an abysmal four for 36 on the power play. The Rangers went zero for five on the power play against the Devils and New York had allowed a power-play goal in eight straight games before Thursday night’s victory over the New York Islanders. Time is growing short for the Rangers to pick up their special teams play.

“I’m not waiting,” Tortorella said. “We have some guys that are very tentative, very careful. We don’t play careful hockey.”

Out in the desert, essentially the same roster that won the Pacific Division has been unable to ride much of a hot streak.

They hit a rough patch off the ice when Greg Jamison was unable to pull together the funds and investors he needed to purchase the team before a deadline with the city of Glendale expired. The Coyotes, with their long-term future now uncertain, are slowly turning around their season and had points in five straight games before Thursday night’s loss to Chicago.

“I think we’re just getting a rhythm,” Coyotes general manager Don Maloney told the team’s website. “You hate to make any excuses, but we played 10 games in 17 nights without basically any camp. The first five, six were a whirlwind. We were trying to sort ourselves out.”

Goalie Mike Smith had rounded into form and stopped 38 of 39 shots to win two starts before giving up six goals and getting chased Thursday. The injury-riddled team is getting healthy and depth on all four lines has helped keep them stay afloat.

The Kings may be the most disappointing of them all. The defending champs are in the midst of a rugged schedule of playing eight of nine games on the road. They hope they can ride out the rough patch without falling much more behind, before opening a stretch of five straight home games and 10 of 12 overall starting March 4. Like the Rangers, the Kings simply can’t score. Toss out Jeff Carter’s four goals, and the Kings only have 15 this season.

Mike Richards only has one goal and the Kings also are struggling on the power play. Through Thursday, Los Angeles was tied for last in the Western Conference with eight points.

“It’s the time where we have to put together a string of wins,” Richards said, “and more or less build confidence.”

Where the teams finish, of course, doesn’t really matter, as long as they make the playoffs. That’s the way hockey is these days. The Kings were the No. 8 seed last season, after all, and the Devils were No. 6 in the East. The Flyers, back in 2010, knocked out the Rangers for a playoff spot on the last day of the 2010 season, then went all the way to the Stanley Cup finals as a No. 7 seed.

So, if you make it in, there’s always a chance things can turn. And there’s certainly enough talent on all three teams to do so.

But something needs to change soon, or they’ll continue to be on the outside looking in.

from:  http://www.bendbulletin.com/article/20130208/NEWS0107/302080381/

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Jonathan Quick was born on January 21st, 1986 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Quick

January 21st, 1986

1 + 21 +1+9+8+6 = 46 = his life lesson = Making history.  It’s about time.  Better late than never.

Six of Cups Tarot card

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January 21st, 1986

January 21st

1 + 21 +2+0+1+3 = 28 = his personal year (from January 21st, 2013 to January 20th, 2014) = Unstoppable.  Hero.

Two of Wands Tarot card

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Jonathan Quick

16512815 83932              54

 

his path of destiny = 54 = Check this out.  Watch this.  Faking you out.  Reading your mind.

Page of Swords Tarot card

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predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

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wedding numerology_edited-1

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Dustin Brown

June 11, 2012              9:30 p.m.

No one saw this coming. Not this way, certainly, if there was any fuzzy vision of it happening at all.

The Los Angeles Kings, who ranked next-to-last in the NHL in scoring, who went through the turmoil of a mid-December coaching change and weren’t assured of a playoff spot until the last weekend of the season, zoomed through the first three rounds of the playoffs before running into resistance from the New Jersey Devils in the Stanley Cup Final.

Slowed but not stopped, the Kings prevailed Monday on their third try, skating off with a 6-1 victory at Staples Center and the first Stanley Cup championship since the franchise was born in 1967.

They won Game 6 of the best-of-seven Final by scoring three quick goals in the first period after the Devils were left short-handed for five minutes because of a major penalty. Dustin BrownJeff Carter and Trevor Lewis scored in a four-minute span and New Jersey never recovered.

The Kings were a team that couldn’t seem to score more than two goals a game from October through April and subjected goaltender Jonathan Quick to extraordinary pressure that he endured stoically while compiling a career-best season and eye-popping postseason numbers.

A team that grew stale under Coach Terry Murray and had to lure Darryl Sutter away from his 3,000-acre farm in Canada to salvage its season. Sutter administered his unique brand of tough love, rebuilding the team’s collective confidence and energizing its offense by adding an aggressiveness that players loved.

A team that had to make a significant trade to change the mix in late February and sent defenseman Jack Johnson to Columbus for Carter, who brought with him a long-term contract and questions about his work ethic. He answered all those questions and gave the offense a new and needed balance, enabling players to fit into roles that best suited them.

The Kings, who couldn’t climb above eighth in the Western Conference, stunned the hockey world by losing only two games in the first three rounds of the playoffs and taking a 3-0 lead over New Jersey in the Final. The Devils, inspired by goalie Martin Brodeur, pushed back twice to prolong the agony for Kings fans, but the wait seemed only to make victory sweeter for the two dozen gap-toothed, banged-up, thickly bearded players who hoisted a trophy that’s the most revered and among the most difficult to earn in professional sports.

No bruise was too painful for players to lift the 35-pound Cup high above their heads as fans wept and exulted at Staples Center and everywhere else hope resided. No player’s arm was too tired to hug every teammate within reach and rejoice in the accomplishment that sometimes only they believed they could pull off.

Fans were on their feet and roaring for the last 10 minutes, savoring a moment some never thought they’d see. Some held up plastic inflatable replicas of the Stanley Cup, though they would see the real one soon enough.

As the final seconds ticked off the clock, players on the bench began jumping up and down in anticipation. At the buzzer, they tossed their sticks and gloves in the air and gathered in a happy pile in one corner, hugging and grinning as the sellout crowd roared its approval.

In the traditional ceremonial handshake line, Brodeur, ever classy even in the face of being denied a fourth championship, took time to embrace Quick and say a few words to him after the metaphorical passing of the torch from the 40-year-old former champion to the 26-year-old newly minted champion.

Though few outside their locker room had predicted it, the Kings had won the Cup and with it a slice of immortality, their names to be engraved on its silver face for eager eyes to find and proud fingers to trace for years to come.

“Definitely, this is the team we should have been all season, especially when Carts first got here,” defenseman Drew Doughty said of the balance and scoring punch Carter brought to the Kings.

“That made our team the way it is now and we definitely didn’t play the way we could until the playoffs started.”

Once they got started, no one could stop them. They mowed down the No. 1-seeded Vancouver Canucks, No. 2-seeded St. Louis Blues and No. 3 Phoenix Coyotes before wrestling with the Devils, the best the East had to offer.

Their postseason performance was a true team effort, with 17 players scoring at least one goal and contributing in ways that didn’t always show up on the score sheet.

Team captain Brown set an emphatic tone with his physicality and persistence and teamed with center Anze Kopitar on the superb penalty-killing unit, whose aggressiveness and skill produced five valuable goals. Winger Dustin Penner emerged from a season-long funk to become a clutch scorer in the early rounds. Brawny rookie forwards Dwight King and Jordan Nolan had their moments, and the fourth line, anchored by center Colin Fraser, fearlessly faced down opponents’ top lines.

Doughty, shrugging off the self-imposed pressure of living up to the eight-year, $56-million contract he signed just before the season began, matured into a responsible defensive player and big-game standout. His end-to-end goal in Game 2 against New Jersey spurred suggestions he might be the next Bobby Orr. It was more than enough for the Kings that he was the first Drew Doughty.

Behind it all was Quick, winner of the Conn Smythe trophy as the most valuable player in the playoffs. “He took himself to a new level and he’s playing on another planet and that’s what he expects,” center Jarret Stoll said.

Perhaps most impressive were the NHL records the Kings set by winning 10 straight road games in one playoff year and 12 straight over two seasons, streaks that ended with Game 5 at New Jersey. Sutter, however, saw those feats as a necessity. “We’re not a home-ice team,” he said, matter-of-factly.

That kind of pragmatism struck a chord with his players from the moment he took over a team that ranked 11th in the West. They were invigorated by his passion and tireless preparation and respected his refusal to let them become complacent once they began winning. They didn’t want to let each other down and they didn’t want to hear Sutter bark if they let him down.

“There’s always reminders, mostly from Darryl,” Kopitar said. “As we all know, he’s a pretty hard guy, so he always keeps us honest and accountable. That’s one of the main things he brought into the dressing room when he came in.”

And so a basically young group that had never won a playoff series together rampaged through three series and learned how to overcome adversity in the Final to win the Cup. No one saw it coming, at least not like this. But what a sight it was.

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Jonathan Quick was born on January 21st, 1986 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jonathan_Quick

January 21st, 1986

January 21st

1 + 21 +2+0+1+2 = 27 = his personal year = First Stanley Cup.

Ace of Wands Tarot card

27 year + 5 (May) = 32 = his personal month (from May 21st, 2012 to June 20th, 2012) = MVP.  Conn Smythe trophy.

Six of Wands Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology available at:

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