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Archive for the ‘Fukushima’ Category

File:Yoshihiko Noda-3.jpg

December 16, 2011

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda of Japan has declared an end to the world’s worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl, saying technicians have regained control of reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

“Today, we have reached a great milestone,” Mr. Noda said in a televised address to the nation. “The reactors are stable, which should resolve one big cause of concern for us all.”

The declaration — which comes nine months after a calamitous earthquake and tsunami destroyed the seaside plant, triggering a huge radiation leak — could set the stage for the return of some evacuees to affected areas.

The government will now focus on removing the fuel stored at the site, opening up the ravaged reactors themselves and eventually dismantling the plant, a process that is expected to take at least four decades, Mr. Noda said.

But for many of the people of Fukushima, the crisis is far from over. More than 160,000 people remain displaced, and even as the government lifts evacuation orders for some communities, many are refusing to return home.

“This does not ring true for us at all,” said Hirofumi Onuma, 52, deputy principal of a high school in Minamisoma, which was evacuated after the disaster. After a desperate clean-up effort, the school was declared safe and reopened at the end of October. Still, only 350 of 705 students have returned.

“The plant is like a black box, and we don’t know what is really happening,” Mr. Onuma said. “I feel no relief.”

The nuclear crisis led to soul searching in a nation already worn down by two lost decades of economic growth, a rapidly aging and now shrinking population, and political catharsis.

Blame for the accident has been laid on a confluence of many factors: a once-in-a-millennium tsunami, a site vulnerable to seismic disasters, a response that fell short and cozy ties between nuclear operators and those tasked to oversee them.

Many experts still doubt the government’s assertion that the plant is now in a stable state and worry that officials are declaring victory only to quell public anger over the accident.

The announcement on Friday of the equivalent of a “cold shutdown,” a technical term that means a reactor’s cooling system operates below 200 degrees Fahrenheit, assumes that the reactors are intact, said Hiroaki Koide, assistant professor at the Research Reactor Institute at Kyoto University and a prominent nuclear critic.

The plant’s operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company, has acknowledged that the uranium fuel in three reactors has likely melted through their containments. Some experts, including Mr. Koide, suspect the fuel could be threatening groundwater.

Experts have also expressed concern over signs of sporadic “recriticality” of the fuel, a phenomenon in which nuclear fission resumes in melted nuclear fuel lying on the floor of a storage pool or reactor core. Tokyo Electric, however, has said any fission is not likely to be self-sustaining. The plant continues to leak radiation. And water used to cool the reactors is still building up at the plant, forcing officials to consider releasing contaminated water into the ocean.

“There is absolutely no cold shutdown,” Mr. Koide said. “It is a term that has been trotted out to give the impression we are reaching some sort of closure.”

“We still face a long battle of epic proportions, and by the time it is really over, most of us will be long dead,” he added.

But Goshi Hosono, minister of state for nuclear power policy, said that recovery work at the plant had progressed enough that any further debacles could be averted.

“We may still face various troubles, but the plant is now stable enough to overcome them,” he said.

The unfolding destruction at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, 160 miles north of Tokyo, has become etched in Japan’s psyche.

The earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan’s northeastern coast knocked out vital cooling systems at the site, causing the cores of three reactors and the spent fuel at a fourth to overheat. Hydrogen explosions eventually blew the tops off three reactor buildings.

Mr. Noda paid tribute to what he called the heroic effort of workers who risked their lives to bring the plant under control.

“I speak for the nation in giving thanks for the heroic and self-sacrificing acts that saved Japan from this nuclear disaster,” he said.

The severity of the disaster has led to movement against nuclear power in Japan. On Sept. 19, an estimated 60,000 people marched in central Tokyo to urge the Japanese government to abandon nuclear power, and smaller protests have followed.

Only eight of the nation’s 54 reactors are operating, as local communities resist the restarting of reactors closed for maintenance or inspection since the March disaster. Mr. Noda has pushed for a swift restart of reactors that pass government-mandated stress tests, however. The government has also moved toward restarting exports of nuclear technology.

Then there is the aftermath. Mr. Noda said that a cleanup of radiation, protecting public health and compensating victims of the nuclear disaster were now the government’s priorities. He said he would set aside more than 1 trillion yen — nearly $13 billion — to pay to decontaminate areas of eastern Japan.

The government, however, has acknowledged that some land may not be habitable for decades.

Safeguarding Japan’s food supply also poses a challenge. Radioactive cesium, which could increase the risk of cancer, has been detected in a wide range of produce including beef, tea leaves, mushrooms, baby milk and rice, the nation’s staple.

“Not all of our battles are over,” Mr. Noda said, “but we will fight to the end.”

“It is a challenge for Japan, a challenge for humanity,” he said.

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/17/world/asia/japans-prime-minister-declares-fukushima-plant-stable.html?_r=1

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Yoshihiko Noda was born on May 20th, 1957 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yoshihiko_Noda

May 20th, 1957

5 + 20 +1+9+5+7 = 47 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Famous.  Internationally known.  The future.

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May 20th, 1957

May 20th

5 + 20 +2+0+1+1 = 29 = his personal year (from May 20th, 2011 to May 19th, 2012) = Competency.  Experts.

29 year + 11 (November) = 40 = his personal month (from November 20th, 2011 to December 19th, 2011) = Help out your fellow human beings in their neighborhoods and communities.

40 month + 16 (16th of the month on Friday November 16th, 2011) = 56 = his personal day = Being diplomatic.  Walking on eggshells.  Make up your own mind on the matter.

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Yoshihiko Noda

761898926 5641         72

 

his path of destiny = 72 = Status quo.  The same old same old.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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17 April 2011 Last updated at 03:37 ET

The operator of Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has said it expects to bring the crisis under control within nine months.

Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) said it aimed to reduce radiation leaks in three months and to cool the reactors within an extra three to six months.

The utility said it also plans to cover the reactor building, which was hit by the huge quake and tsunami on 11 March.

Nearly 14,000 people died and another 14,000 are still unaccounted for.

On Sunday, the US pledged to support Japan’s reconstruction efforts.

Radiation levels in the sea near reactor 2 rose to 6,500 times the legal limit on Friday, up from 1,100 times a day earlier, says Tepco, raising fears of fresh radiation leaks.

‘Cold shutdown’

Tsunehisa Katsumata, the chairman of Tepco, Asia’s largest utility, told a news conference in Tokyo on Sunday that they would need up to nine months to bring the power plant to ”cold shutdown”.

He said the plan would allow the tens of thousands of families evacuated from the area around the facility to return home as soon as possible.

“We sincerely apologise for causing troubles,” Mr Katsumata said. “We are doing our utmost to prevent the crisis from further worsening.”

Japan’s government had ordered Tepco to come up with a timetable to end the leaks of radiation.

The BBC’s Roland Buerk in Tokyo says the problem is it is still not certain that the nine-month deadline is something that can be achieved.

Meanwhile, Tepco plans to send two remote-controlled robots into one of the reactors on Sunday to gauge radiation and temperature levels.

Emergency workers have been unable to enter any reactor building since the disaster.

from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13107846

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Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant was “born” on March 26th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fukushima_I_Nuclear_Power_Plant

March 26th, 1971

3 + 26 +1+9+7+1 = 47 = Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant’s life lesson = what Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant is here to learn = Famous.  Name & fame.  Notoriety.  Name recognition.  (Inter)nationally known.  High profile.  Well-known.  Household name.  Legacy. 

 

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Since the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant was “born” in 1971 it is 40 years old. 

The day of birth rules ages 27 to 54.

March 26th, 1971

26 = In the news.  Photos.

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17 April 2011 Last updated at 03:37 ET

The operator of Japan’s crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has said it expects to bring the crisis under control within nine months.

Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco) said it aimed to reduce radiation leaks in three months and to cool the reactors within an extra three to six months.

The utility said it also plans to cover the reactor building, which was hit by the huge quake and tsunami on 11 March.

Nearly 14,000 people died and another 14,000 are still unaccounted for.

On Sunday, the US pledged to support Japan’s reconstruction efforts.

Radiation levels in the sea near reactor 2 rose to 6,500 times the legal limit on Friday, up from 1,100 times a day earlier, says Tepco, raising fears of fresh radiation leaks.

‘Cold shutdown’

Tsunehisa Katsumata, the chairman of Tepco, Asia’s largest utility, told a news conference in Tokyo on Sunday that they would need up to nine months to bring the power plant to ”cold shutdown”.

He said the plan would allow the tens of thousands of families evacuated from the area around the facility to return home as soon as possible.

“We sincerely apologise for causing troubles,” Mr Katsumata said. “We are doing our utmost to prevent the crisis from further worsening.”

Japan’s government had ordered Tepco to come up with a timetable to end the leaks of radiation.

The BBC’s Roland Buerk in Tokyo says the problem is it is still not certain that the nine-month deadline is something that can be achieved.

Meanwhile, Tepco plans to send two remote-controlled robots into one of the reactors on Sunday to gauge radiation and temperature levels.

Emergency workers have been unable to enter any reactor building since the disaster.

from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13107846

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Tsunehisa Katsumata was born on March 29th, 1940 according to http://www.kddi.com/english/corporate/ir/shareholder/meeting/20100617/pdf/annualmeeting26.pdf

March 29th, 1940

March 29th

3 + 29 +2+0+1+1 = 36 = his personal year (from March 29th, 2011 to March 28th, 2012) = Weighty responsibilities.  Shouldering a heavy burden.  Feeling like the weight of the world is on his shoulders.

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Why Japan’s Mainstream Media Can’t Be Trusted To Report Objectively On TEPCO (東京電力)By Jake Adelstein | Published: 12 April 2011

When the earthquake struck Japan on March 11th and knocked out TEPCO’s Fukushima nuclear reactor, setting off a chain reaction of disasters–TEPCO’s chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata was nowhere to be found.  Where was he? He was on a tour of China with members of some of Japan’s largest media outlets–and TEPCO was footing the bill.

On March 30th, not only did TEPCO admit that the chairman had been taking Japanese mass media power brokers on the trip to China but also that TEPCO paid the majority of the travel fees for the participants. On April 7th, a reporter asked TEPCO to reveal the names of the mass media firms that had executives and/or former executives joining the chairman on his trip, but TEPCO dodged the question.

It’s well known that TEPCO pays huge advertising fees to most media outlets; it is one of the largest advertisers in Japan. It’s not as well known that the president of TEPCO, Masataka Shimizu, is also the chairman of  the Japan Society for Corporate Communication Studies (JSCCS), which includes among its members former and current top executives from Asahi Beer, Toyota, and Dentsu, Japan’s largest advertising agency. The board of directors also includes a representative of Nihon Television’s Reporting Bureau, Economic News section:

大野 伸 (日本テレビ放送網(株) 報道局 経済部)

In a sense, the president of TEPCO is the chairman of what is whispered to be the equivalent of a lobby group that wields the power of advertising revenue over anyone who crosses their paths. It is ostensibly a group of scholars, executives, advertising agency bosses, mass media representatives, and businessmen who gather together to study more effective means of communications. Veteran Japanese reporters assert that the society also functions as powerful consortium of large corporations who know how to use the threat of taking away advertising dollars as a whip to keep the Japanese media muzzled.

You don’t have to be too bright to figure out that if TEPCO, Toyota, Asahi Beer and Dentsu somehow banded together and pulled advertising from your newspaper, television channel, or radio program, that it would be financially devastating. In the April edition of weekly magazine Asahi Geino, Noted journalist, Takashi Uesugi claims that on March 15th, after repeatedly lampooning and criticizing TEPCO on TBS Radio that the producer asked him to leave the show, claiming that the program was being “revamped.” TBS Radio refuses to comment on the issue at present.

Masataka Shimizu, the president of TEPCO, is still listed as the chairman of the JSCCS but on April 1st his “greetings” were taken down from the sight and replaced with the words of the vice-chairman. The current page expresses condolences to the victims of the recent disasters. There is no mention of the problems at the Fukushima reactor,  only that Chairman Shimizu is now too busy dealing with the disaster to fully devote himself to his duties for the organization.

According to a mainstream Japanese media reporter, the TEPCO tours of China have been going on for over ten year. “The trips have a token amount of study, such as visiting a factory, or whatever has been scheduled to justify the event for that year. In reality, most of the day is devoted to sight-seeing. At night the TEPCO executives wine and dine the reporters, editors, or  mass media representatives. And of course, the obligatory karaoke.”

It’s not surprising that much of the Japanese mainstream media has been less than critical of  TEPCO up until now. It’s very hard to raise your voice loud enough to be heard from inside the pocket of your sponsor.

from:  http://www.japansubculture.com/2011/04/why-japans-mainstream-media-cant-be-trusted-to-report-objectively-on-tepco-%e6%9d%b1%e4%ba%ac%e9%9b%bb%e5%8a%9b%ef%bc%89/

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Jake Adelstein was born on January 1st, 1969 according to http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3001096.Jake_Adelstein

January 1st, 1969

1 +1+9+6+9 = 26 = his “secret” number = Journalist.  Reporter.  The press.  The media.

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Jake Adelstein

1125 145312595          44

his path of destiny / how he learns what he is here to learn = 44 = Twitter.  Tweeting.  In the moment.  Right here, right now.  How it is.  Get used to it.  What is.  The eternal now.  In the zone.  Be yourself.  Comfortable in your own skin.  I am me.  It is what it is.  I’m alright, right now.  How’s it going?  What’s up?  What’s going on?  What’s happening?  Here’s what’s happening.  Up-to-date.  Recently updated.  The latest update.  Latest development.  Keep me up-to-date.  I’ll keep you posted.  Play-by-play.  Moment by moment.  Current status.  Staying current.  Staying on topic.  Stay tuned.  Tune in.  Checking in with you to see where you’re at with things.  Stream of consciousness.  Daily diary.  Keeping a log.  Short-term memory.  Sitting still.  Sit back.  Whatever happens, happens.  Que será, será. 

follow Jake on Twitter:

http://twitter.com/jakeadelstein

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3 April 2011 Last updated at 03:17 ET

The bodies of two workers killed by the tsunami which wrecked Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant more than three weeks ago have been recovered.

Their remains were found last Wednesday but had to be decontaminated before they could be returned to the families.

Meanwhile, officials are still struggling to stop contaminated water leaking into the sea from a crack in reactor 2.

They now intend to try using an absorbent polymer to plug the gap.

Initial attempts to stop the leak by pouring concrete into the containment pit have failed.

The authorities say the radioactive material will rapidly dissipate in the sea and is not thought likely to endanger health.

But the pools of contaminated water within the nuclear plant are hampering efforts to stabilise the reactors.

Thousands still missing

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco), which operates the Fukushima Daiichi plant, said the bodies of the two missing workers were found on 30 March in the basement of the turbine building of reactor 4.

They were named as Kazuhiko Kokubo, 24, and Yoshiki Terashima, 21.

They died of bleeding from multiple head wounds, Japan’s Kyodo news agency reported.

Fukushima nuclear plant

  • Reactor 1: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas explosion. Radioactive water detected in reactor and basement, and groundwater
  • Reactor 2: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas blast; containment damage suspected. Highly radioactive water detected in reactor and adjoining tunnel
  • Reactor 3: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas blast; containment damage possible. Spent fuel pond partly refilled with water after running low. Radioactive water detected in reactor and basement
  • Reactor 4: Reactor shut down prior to quake. Fires and explosion in spent fuel pond; water level partly restored
  • Reactors 5 & 6: Reactors shut down. Temperature of spent fuel pools now lowered after rising high

  • Q&A: Health effects of radiation
  • Q&A: Fukushima radiation alert
  • An operation to search for those still missing from communities further north along the coast is continuing on land and at sea, says the BBC’s Rachel Harvey in Tokyo.

    More than 60 bodies have been recovered over the past two days, our correspondent says, but more than 16,000 people remain unaccounted for.

    On Saturday, Tepco officials said water contaminated with radioactive iodine was leaking from a 20cm (8in) crack in the pit at reactor 2.

    They had earlier said they suspected radioactive material was escaping continuously from the plant.

    Measurements showed the air above the radioactive water in the pit contained 1,000 millisieverts of radioactivity.

    Also on Saturday, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan visited the area around Fukushima – his first ground visit to the disaster zone, although he had flown over tsunami-hit areas the day after the earthquake.

    Mr Kan, who flew into Rikuzentakata on a military helicopter from Tokyo, visited an evacuation centre and the base camp for workers trying to stabilise the plant, just inside the 20-km exclusion zone around Fukushima Daiichi.

    Mr Kan assured people in Rikuzentakata affected by the disaster that the Japanese government would do all it could to help them.

    from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12949783

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    In the first confirmation of fatalities at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power complex, the plant’s operator on Sunday announced the recovery of the bodies of two workers who had gone missing after the devastating earthquake and tsunami.

    Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Yoshiki Terashima, 21, and Kazuhiko Kokubo, 24, had rushed to the turbine room of the No. 4 reactor to inspect the power switches and test the operation valves after the March 11 earthquake. An autopsy revealed that they likely died from the force of impact from the tsunami.

    Their bodies were found in the building’s basement Wednesday afternoon and had to be decontaminated, the company said, adding the announcement was delayed out of consideration for the families.

    from:  http://www.townshiptimes.co.za/?p=556

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    Two employees of Tokyo Electric Power Company who had been missing since the March 11 quake and tsunami have been found dead at the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, the utility said on Sunday, adding that they died of bleeding from multiple wounds.

    They are believed to have died around 4:00pm (local time) on March 11, apparently after the 2:46pm quake triggered a massive tsunami.

    Their bodies were found Wednesday and required work to remove radioactive materials from them, the utility said.

    The plant is continuing to release high-level radiation in Japan’s worst ever nuclear crisis.

    The two were identified as Kazuhiko Kokubo, 24, and Yoshiki Terashima, 21, who both belonged to an operation management division.

    from:  http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/04/03/3180953.htm

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    Each letter of the first name rules 9 years of life.  Ages 0 to 27 are ruled by the sum of the first three letters of the first name.

    Yoshiki Terashima

    25 (Y is the 25th letter of the alphabet) + 15 (o is the 15th letter of the alphabet) + 19 (s is the 19th letter of the alphabet) = 59

    So from ages zero to twenty-seven he had the number 59 going on.

    59 = Nuclear energy.  Decontaminate.  Funeral arrangements.

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    using the number/letter grid:

    1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
    A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
    J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
    S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
     

    Where:

    A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

    B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

    C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

    D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

    E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

    F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

    G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

    H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

    I = 9               R = 9

     

    Kazuhiko Kokubo

    2                6    6

     

    the most important thing he could do and how he obtained his heart’s desire both = KO = 26 = In the news.

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    Ages 18 to 27 are ruled by the third letter of the name.

    Kazuhiko Kokubo

    Z is the 26th letter of the alphabet, so from ages eighteen to twenty-seven he had the number 26 going on.

    26 = In the news.

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    nullA massive tsunami hits the coastal areas of Iwanuma, ...The town Minamisanriku is still submerged Saturday after Friday's strong earthquake-triggered tsunami in Miyagi prefecture, northern Japan.

    11 March 2011 Last updated at 09:58 ET

    Japan’s most powerful earthquake since records began has struck the north-east coast, triggering a massive tsunami.

    Cars, ships and buildings were swept away by a wall of water after the 8.9-magnitude quake, which struck about 400km (250 miles) north-east of Tokyo.

    A state of emergency has been declared at a nuclear power plant but officials said there were no radiation leaks.

    The death toll is unclear, but police say 200 to 300 bodies have been found in the port city of Sendai.

    Many more people are unaccounted for.

    With train services suspended, there are millions of people on the streets of Tokyo tonight. The official advice is, if you’re safe, to stay where you are. But after the shock of the quake many people just want to get home.

    Here in Tokyo, even though it wasn’t the epicentre, the quake was still felt very powerfully. The ground rolled and rumbled underfoot and you could hear the great skyscrapers creaking and cracking as they swayed.

    Walking was like crossing the deck of a ship at sea. People poured down from their offices and stood in the street staring up.

    The tremor, measured at 8.9 by the US Geological Survey, hit at 1446 local time (0546 GMT) at a depth of about 24km.

    A tsunami warning was extended across the Pacific to North and South America.

    The Red Cross in Geneva warned that the waves could be higher than some Pacific islands, Reuters news agency said.

    Coastal areas in the Philippines, and other parts of the Pacific were evacuated ahead of the tsunami’s expected arrival.

    The first waves, currently under a metre high, have started reaching Hawaii.

    New Zealand downgraded its alert to a marine threat, meaning strong and unusual currents were expected.

    ‘Train missing’

    Strong waves hit Japan’s Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures, officials said, damaging dozens of coastal communities.

    Kyodo news agency said a 10-metre wave (33ft) struck Sendai, which is in Miyagi.

    Map

    Japan’s NHK television showed a massive surge of debris-filled water sweeping away buildings, cars and ships and reaching far inland.

    Motorists could be seen trying to speed away from the wall of water.

    A passenger train with an unknown number of people aboard was missing in one coastal area, police told Kyodo.

    And a ship carrying 100 people was swept away, Japanese media reported, quoting police in Miyagi. It is not clear what happened to the vessel.

    Farmland around Sendai was submerged and the waves pushed cars across the runway of the city’s airport. Fires broke out in the city’s centre.

    Thousands of people are being evacuated from near the Fukushima power plant, where a state of emergency has been declared. The cooling system failed in one of its reactors when it shut down automatically because of the earthquake.

    Deadliest earthquakes

    27 July 1976, Tangshan, China: est 655,000 killed, 7.5

    26 Dec 2004, Sumatra, Indonesia: 9.1 quake and tsunami kills 227,898 across Pacific region

    12 Jan 2010, Haiti: 222,570 killed, 7.0

    12 May 2008, Sichuan, China: 87,587 killed, 7.9

    8 Oct 2005, Pakistan: 80,361 killed, 7.6

    31 May 1970 Chimbote, Peru: 70,000 killed, 7.9

    20 June 1990, Manjil, Iran: 40,000 killed, 7.4

    26 Dec 2003, Bam, Iran: 31,000 killed, 6.6

    26 Jan 2001, Gujarat, India: 20,023 killed, 7.7

    17 Aug 1999, Izmit, Turkey: 17,118 killed, 7.6

    30 Sep 1993 Latur, India: 9,748 killed, 6.2

    16 Jan 1995, Kobe, Japan: 5,530 dead, 6.9

    Source: USGS

    Prime Minister Naoto Kan said no radiation leaks at that power plant or any of the other reactors in the quake-hit zone had been detected.

    The UN’s nuclear agency said four nuclear power plants had shut down safely.

    In Iwate prefecture, also near the epicentre, an official said it was difficult to gauge the extent of the destruction.

    “Roads were badly damaged and cut off as the tsunami washed away debris, cars and many other things,” said Hiroshi Sato, a disaster management official in Iwate.

    The earthquake also triggered a massive blaze at an oil refinery in Ichihara city in Chiba prefecture near Tokyo, engulfing storage tanks.

    There were reports of about 20 people injured in Tokyo after the roof of a hall collapsed on to a graduation ceremony.

    Residents and workers in Tokyo rushed out of apartment buildings and office blocks and gathered in parks and open spaces as aftershocks continued to hit.

    Many people in Tokyo said they had never felt such a powerful earthquake.

    In central Tokyo, Jeffrey Balanag said he was stuck in his office in the Shiodome Sumitomo building because the elevators had stopped working.

    “We’re almost seasick from the constant rolling of the building,” he told the BBC.

    Bullet train services to northern Japan were halted and rapid transit in Tokyo was suspended, stranding many workers in the city centre.

    About four million homes in and around Tokyo suffered power outages.

    In a televised address, Mr Kan extended his sympathy to the victims of the disaster and said an emergency response headquarters had been set up.

    Japan tsunami map - 11 March 2011
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    Prime Minister of Japan Naoto Kan was born October 10th, 1946 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naoto_Kan
     October 10th, 1946
    10 + 10 +1+9+4+6 = 40 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Public service.  How can I help?  Helping out your fellow human being.  Aid.  Assistance.
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    October 10th, 1946
    October 10th
    10 + 10 +2+0+1+0 = 23 = his personal year (from October 10th, 2010 to October 9th, 2011) = Leadership.  Taking action.
    23 year + 3 (March) = 26 = his personal month (from March 10th, 2011 to April 9th, 2011) = In the news.
    26 month + 11 (11th of the month on Friday March 11th, 2011) = 37 = his personal day = Looking out for the best interests of his fellow countrymen/citizens.
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    File:Akihito 090710-1600b.jpg
    The Emperor of Japan Akihito was born December 23rd, 1933 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akihito
    December 23rd, 1933
    12 + 23 +1+9+3+3 = 51 = his life lesson = what he is here to learn = Government official.  Harsh reality.
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    December 23rd, 1933
    December 23rd
    12 + 23 +2+0+1+0 = 38 = his personal year (from December 23rd, 2010 to December 22nd, 2011) = Take care.
    38 year + 2 (February) = 40 = his personal month (from February 23rd, 2011 to March 22nd, 2011) = Public service.  How can I help?  Helping out your fellow human being.  Aid.  Assistance.
    40 month + 11 (11th of the month on Friday March 11th, 2011) = 51 = his personal day = Harsh reality.
     
    When his number (51 (12 + 23 +1+9+3+3 = 51)) comes up, that’s when he gets to live/experience what he is here to live/experience.  So unfortunately this was HIS day!!!
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    File:FukushimaCity05.jpg
    Fukushima, Japan was “born” on April 1st, 1907 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fukushima,_Fukushima
    April 1st, 1907
    4 + 1 +1+9+0+7 = 22 = Fukushima’s life lesson = what Fukushima is here to learn = Look before you leap.  Good luck.  You’ve got to be kidding me.  Are you kidding me?
    —————————————————————————————–
    April 1st, 1907
    April 1st
    4 + 1 +2+0+1+0 = 8 = Fukushima’s personal year (from April 1st, 2010 to April 1st, 2011) = Structures.  Foundation.
    8 year + 3 (March) = 11 = Fukushima’s personal month for March 2011 = Consequences.
    11 month + 11 (11th of the month on Friday March 11th, 2011 (when the 8.9 earthquake occurred)) = 22 = Fukushima’s personal day = Look before you leap.  Good luck.  You’ve got to be kidding me.  Are you kidding me?
     
    When Fukushima’s number (22 (4 + 1 +1+9+0+7 = 22)) comes up, that’s when Fukushima gets to live/experience what Fukushima is here to live/experience.  So unfortunately this was Fukushima’s day.
    —————————————————————————————-
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    Friday March 11th, 2011 = the day of the earthquake
     
    March 11th, 2011
     
    3 + 11 +2+0+1+1 = 18 = the life lesson and personal year (from March 11th, 2011 to March 10th, 2012) of the earthquake in Japan = Surreal.
     
     
    18 year + 3 (March) = 21 = the earthquake in Japan’s personal month (from March 11th, 2011 to April 10th, 2011) = For all the world to see.
     
     
    21 month + 11 (11th of the month on Friday March 11th, 2011) = 32 = the earthquake in Japan’s personal day = The biggest.  Gigantic.  Huge.  Enormous.   

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