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Archive for the ‘June 22nd’ Category

Lite way to stay sweet

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 4:00 am

Some culinary snobs don’t consider that cake-like log covered in glaze and chocolate that you bought at the grocery store an eclair.

So on this, their hallowed holiday known as National Chocolate Eclair Day, just smile and remember a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.

According to Ferguson Plarre Bakehouses, which is famous for the French pastry, to produce a real eclair, a baker must prepare pâte à choux — a dough that generates the necessary steam to hollow out a giant cavity into which a pastry chef can pump that lush vanilla cream.

If you really want to do that, at least a dozen demonstrations are available on YouTube.

Eclair is the French word for lightning. It is believed that the pastry received its name because it glistens when coated with confectioner’s glaze. The treat orginated in France around the turn of the 19th century.

The first known recipe for eclairs appears in the Boston Cooking School Cook Book by Mrs. D.A. Lincoln, published in 1884.

This recipe is something I came up with in an attempt to make an inexpensive, low-fat, sugar-free eclair. Does it taste the same? Heck, no! Is it pretty good, though.

Charlotte’s Imitation Eclairs

  • 1 (8-count) package croissants
  • 1/4 cup Stevia
  • 1 small package sugar-free vanilla pudding
  • 2 sugar-free hot chocolate mixes
  • 1/2 cup 2-percent milk

Make the croissant rolls according to package directions, except sprinkle Stevia on rolls before baking. If you’re going for reduced-fat, be sure and use that variety.

While the rolls are baking, make the vanilla pudding. I prefer the cooked rather than instant pudding, made according to microwave instructions. Do not refrigerate pudding.

After pudding is made, bring milk to a boil in the microwave, I prefer 2 percent (it doesn’t mix just right with skim), take the milk out and mix in both packages of sugar-free hot chocolate mix. I prefer dark chocolate.

After rolls and pudding are room temperature, stuff the inside of the roll with pudding. You may use a professional instrument or a basting instrument or syringe to inject pudding into rolls.

After the chocolate mix is room temperature, glaze the top of roll as lightly or heavily as you like. Me? If I’m alone, I dip them into the mix. I count being among family members as being alone.

from:  http://www.news-journal.com/features/features_food/article_ffdf1151-1ef9-5172-95e0-4cacb12865f0.html

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June 22nd, 2011

June 22nd

6 + 22 +2+0+1+1 = 32 = National.

32 + 6 (June) = 38 = Chef.  Culinary.  Cooking.  Stomach.  Digest.

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