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Archive for the ‘recall Scott Walker’ Category

June 5, 2012

Gov. Scott Walker, whose decision to cut collective bargaining rights for most public workers set off a firestorm in a state usually known for its political civility, easily held on to his job on Tuesday, becoming the first governor in the country to survive a recall election and dealing a painful blow to Democrats and labor unions.
Wisconsin Recall Results »
CANDIDATE PCT.

Walker 53.5%

Barrett 46.0

Trivedi 0.6
12:40 AM 96% reporting

Mr. Walker soundly defeated Mayor Tom Barrett of Milwaukee, the Democrats’ nominee in the recall attempt, with most precincts across the state reporting results. The victory by Mr. Walker, a Republican who was forced into an election to save his job less than two years into his first term, ensures that Republicans largely retain control of this state’s capital, and his fast-rising political profile is likely to soar still higher among conservatives.

Here in Waukesha, some Republican voters said the result ended the most volatile partisan fight in memory, one that boiled over 16 months ago in the collective bargaining battle and expanded into scuffles about spending, jobs, taxes, the role and size of government, and more. Democrats, some of whom are already pledging to mount strong challenges for state lawmakers’ seats in November, seemed less sure about the meaning of Mr. Walker’s victory.

“Tonight, we tell Wisconsin, we tell our country and we tell people all across the globe that voters really do want leaders who stand up and make the tough decisions,” Mr. Walker said, delivering a victory speech to supporters here. “But now it is time to move on and move forward in Wisconsin.”

In his concession speech in Milwaukee, Mr. Barrett said: “We are a state that has been deeply divided. It is up to all of us — our side and their side — to listen, to listen to each other.”

The result raised broader questions about the strength of labor groups, who had called hundreds of thousands of voters and knocked on thousands of doors. The outcome also seemed likely to embolden leaders in other states who have considered limits to unions as a way to solve budget problems, but had watched the backlash against Mr. Walker with worry.

Some Republicans said they considered Mr. Walker’s victory one indication that Wisconsin, which President Obama won easily in 2008 and which Democrats have carried in every presidential election since 1988, may be worth battling for this time.

“Obviously, Scott Walker winning tonight means that the Republicans are here for real,” said Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee. “Conservatives are here for real.” Mr. Priebus was attending Mr. Walker’s victory party at the Waukesha County Exposition Center, where “We Stand With Walker” signs were all around.

But even with the Republican victory on Tuesday, it remained an open question whether Mitt Romney, the party’s presidential nominee, can assume the momentum of Mr. Walker’s campaign. In exit polling of voters, 18 percent of Walker supporters said they favored Mr. Obama, and the president led in a matchup against Mr. Romney. Voters in the exit surveys also said they saw Mr. Obama as better equipped to improve the economy and help the middle class.

Republicans prevailed in at least four recall elections on Tuesday for other offices, including a race for lieutenant governor, which the incumbent, Rebecca Kleefisch, won. Scott Fitzgerald, the State Senate’s majority leader, who had ushered much of Mr. Walker’s agenda through the Legislature, also survived. Late Tuesday, votes were still being counted in one State Senate race in Racine, an outcome that will determine which party narrowly controls the chamber, at least until November.

Mr. Walker, who raised millions of dollars from conservative donors outside the state, had a strong financial advantage, in part because a quirk in state law allowed him months of unlimited fund-raising, from the time the recall challenge was mounted to when the election was officially called. As of late last month, about $45.6 million had been spent on behalf of Mr. Walker, compared with about $17.9 million for Mr. Barrett, according to data from the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, a nonpartisan group that tracks spending.

“What it shows is the peril of corporate dollars in an election and the dangers of Citizens United,” said Dennis Van Roekel, president of the National Education Association, a school workers’ union, referring to the 2010 Supreme Court decision that barred the federal government from restricting political expenditures from corporations, unions and other groups.

Wisconsin Recall Results »

CANDIDATE PCT.

Walker 53.4%

Barrett 46.0

Trivedi 0.6
12:42 AM   97% reporting

Voters went to the polls in droves, and some polling places needed extra ballots brought in as long lines of people waited. One polling location was so swamped, state officials said, that it found itself using photocopied ballots, which later had to be hand-counted. The final flurry of television advertising — with Mr. Walker outspending Mr. Barrett seven to one — seemed to have little impact on the outcome. Nearly 9 in 10 people said they had made up their minds before May, according to exit poll interviews.

The recall race carried implications well beyond Wisconsin, particularly in the escalating fight between wealthy conservative donors and labor unions. Many Republican contributors from across the country who have invested millions in the presidential race also sent checks to Mr. Walker, hoping to inflict deep wounds on organized labor, a key constituency for Democrats.

The outcome was also being closely monitored in Boston by Mr. Romney’s campaign and in Chicago at Mr. Obama’s re-election headquarters for a signal of how the electorate is viewing the big issues in the race for the White House. The president kept his distance from Wisconsin, to the dismay of many Democrats in the state, in an effort to avoid alienating independent voters he hopes to win over in the fall.

A snapshot of the Wisconsin electorate, gleaned through surveys with voters as they left the polls, found that a majority of men had supported Mr. Walker, while most women had voted for Mr. Barrett. Almost a fifth of the electorate was 65 or older, with only about one in 10 voters of college age. The recall race unfolded against a backdrop of economic uncertainty, with only 2 in 10 voters saying their family’s finances have improved in the two years since Mr. Walker was elected. About a third said their financial situation had grown worse, and more than 4 in 10 said their finances had stayed the same.

The political war in Wisconsin began in February 2011 when Governor Walker, only weeks into his first term, announced that he needed to cut benefits and collective bargaining rights for most public workers as a way to solve an expected state budget deficit of $3.6 billion.

Tens of thousands of union supporters and Democrats protested in Madison, the capital, and the State Senate’s Democrats — who were a minority in the chamber but had enough members to prevent a quorum — went into hiding in hotels and houses in Illinois to try, unsuccessfully, to prevent a vote on the measure.

By January, critics of Mr. Walker delivered more than 900,000 signatures on petitions to recall him, far more than the one-quarter of voters from the last election that state law requires.

The election, which cost local governments as much as $18 million to carry out, has raised another debate over the appropriateness of using a recall vote to remove officials.

“Recall was never meant to be used just because you don’t like the way the other side is governing,” said Jenny Beth Martin, a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots, which made tens of thousands of calls to voters in recent days in support of Mr. Walker.

Around the nation, numerous efforts have been made over the years to recall governors, but only three, including the push to remove Mr. Walker, met the requirements to place the matter on the ballot. In California, Gov. Gray Davis was removed in 2003, and in North Dakota, Gov. Lynn Frazier was recalled in 1921.

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/06/us/politics/walker-survives-wisconsin-recall-effort.html

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Scott Kevin Walker was born on November 2nd, 1967 (time of birth unknown) in Colorado Springs, Colorado according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Walker_(politician)

November 2nd, 1967

11 + 2 +1+9+6+7 = 36 = his life lesson = Incumbent.  Recall election.  Having his work cut out for him.  Going to far.  Going over the line.  Abuse of power.

Ten of Wands Tarot card

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Tuesday June 5th, 2012

November 2nd, 1967

November 2nd

11 + 2 +2+0+1+1 = 17 = his personal year (from November 2nd, 2011 to November 1st, 2012) = Be realistic.

17 year + 6 (June) = 23 = his personal month (from June 2nd, 2012 to July 1st, 2012) = Leadership.  Taking action.  Direct action.

23 month + 5 (th of the month on Tuesday June 5th, 2012) = 28 = his personal day = Surviving the recall election.

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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09/16/11       03:05 PM ET

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker said Friday all he knows about FBI agents seizing items from the home of one of his top agency officials is what he’s seen in the media and that his office has not been told anything about the raid.

The first-term governor said “it’s hard to tell” whether he should be concerned about Wednesday’s raid on the home of Cynthia Archer, who was his aide while Milwaukee County executive and followed him to work in state government when he was elected governor.

“We don’t know what exactly is involved,” Walker said Friday when asked about the raid following an unrelated event in Milwaukee.

“Until we know, obviously it’s a concern but again, I don’t know any more details than what I’ve seen reported in the media outlets around the state,” he added.

The raid came amid a secret Milwaukee County investigation that the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, citing unnamed people familiar with the case, has reported focuses on whether county staffers in Walker’s office did political work on the taxpayer dime.

Walker said he has not been in touch with Archer.

Archer told The Associated Press on Thursday that she has done nothing wrong and hasn’t been told whether she is part of the ongoing investigation. When asked what kinds of items were taken from her home, she said law enforcement officials had given her strict orders not to comment further.

Archer’s neighbor, Dale Riechers, said FBI agents also came to his home and took a hard drive from an old computer he bought from Archer at a garage sale a few weeks ago.

The raid comes as a reminder of long-simmering questions surrounding work by Walker’s county staffers, one of whom admitted last year to anonymously posting pro-Walker comments on websites while on county time. It also raises questions about how deep the investigation will go and what implications it could have for the rising Republican star.

Democratic Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm has declined to comment on the case, as has the FBI.

Walker said he couldn’t comment about whether he believed the investigation was politically motivated.

“I don’t know because I don’t have any information about what it’s based on,” he said.

The Journal Sentinel reported that people familiar with the county investigation who spoke on condition of anonymity said the investigation focuses on the activities of Archer and Tom Nardelli, Walker’s former county chief of staff. Both worked three years in Walker’s county executive office then followed him to Madison after the November election.

Nardelli quit his state job in July and did not return messages seeking comment Friday. Archer served as deputy Department of Administration Secretary until she quit Aug. 19 and started the Children and Family Services job on Aug. 20 before going on paid medical leave.

Walker has said prosecutors have never contacted him in person but that his campaign had previously been asked for emails and information related to the staffer in his county office, Darlene Wink, who posted pro-Walker messages on websites on work time. Wink resigned in May 2010 after admitting to posting the anonymous comments on websites and blogs.

 

from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/16/scott-walker-cynthia-archer-fbi-raid-wisconsin_n_965899.html

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Cynthia AArcher

CAA

311

 

her true character and her primary challenge both = CA = 31 = Controversy.  Scandal.  Things get out of hand.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Walker probe puts prominent Milwaukee commercial Realtor in jail

Andrew P. Jensen Jr., a principal with Milwaukee-based commercial real estate brokerage The Boerke Company Inc., was booked into the Milwaukee County Jail Tuesday night.
Jensen was taken to the jail by an investigator with the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s office, said Capt. Scott Stiff of the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Department.
No charges have been filed yet against Jensen, Stiff said. Inmates can be held in jail for up to 72 hours without charges being filed. If the District Attorney’s office fails to file charges by then, the Sheriff’s Department must release Jensen, Stiff said.
When asked why Jensen was taken to jail, Sheila Stanelle, senior executive assistant for Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm, said, “Our office would have no comment on that at this time.”
Jensen “is still pending felony charges, he is expected in intake court today between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. Depending on the court calendar it may not happen until tomorrow,” said Karen Brimley-Massey of the Sheriff’s Department.
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is reporting that Jensen’s arrest is related to a John Doe investigation by the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s office of Gov. Scott Walker’s current and former aides. The probe began last year when a staff member working for Walker, then county executive, was caught posting online political comments during work time.
However the scope of the investigation grew and in September about a dozen law enforcement officers, including FBI agents, searched the Madison home of Cynthia Archer, who was previously deputy secretary in Walker’s Department of Administration. Archer was top aide to Walker while he was county executive and followed him to Madison after he won the governor’s race in November.
Jensen joined The Boerke Company in 1986. He specializes in office property deals. He is also past chairman of the Commercial Association of Realtors Wisconsin (CARW).

from:  http://www.biztimes.com/daily/2011/12/14/

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Andrew Jensen

154955 155155          51

 

his path of destiny = 51 = Authorities.  Police.  Law enforcement.  The law.  Get a lawyer.  No one is above the law.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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November 1, 2011

Mahlon Mitchell is not talking himself up as a candidate for governor. In fact, when the president of the Professional Firefighters of Wisconsin union received a civil rights award at the Voces de la Frontera 10th anniversary gala in Milwaukee Thursday, he didn’t mention the topic.

But others have in recent days, as something of a “Draft Mahlon Mitchell” campaign has stirred up and the press have begun to speculate.

And when I mentioned the prospect as part of my keynote address at the gala, the crowd of more than 400 roared approval.

In traveling the state, I have been struck by two things about the recall election that Gov. Scott Walker is all but certain to face next spring.

First, while the pundits and politicians are obsessing a bit about who will challenge Walker, the tens of thousands of activists are less concerned. Their focus is on gathering the more than 540,000 signatures needed to force the governor to face the voters. The energy for the recall is unprecedented, and it’s everywhere, from traditionally Republican Walworth County (where Walker was raised) to Kenosha (where activists plan to rally at midnight Nov. 14 to be first to sign on for the recall drive that officially begins Nov. 15) to Rhinelander in the far north (where there is talk of using snowmobiles to get petitions to remote areas).

Second, while most people would still like to see former U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold run against Walker, there is a genuine openness to new names and new kinds of contenders. This is going to be a “change” election, and change elections often usher in new faces and new approaches.

That’s where Mitchell comes in. He’s never held public office, and really became a political player only when the governor attacked collective bargaining rights and the firefighters leapt to the defense of the labor movement. But he has impressed people with his commitment, passion and oratory.

Does that mean he’s ready to run for governor? We’ll see. There’s enough talk ? and even a “Wisconsin for Mahlon Mitchell” website ? that he will be drawn into the discussion along with more familiar names such as former Dane County Executive Kathleen Falk, Assembly Minority Leader Peter Barca, state Sen. Jon Erpenbach and former Congressman David Obey.

What the talk of a Mitchell candidacy says to me is that Wisconsinites are open to a real change in direction from Walker’s careerist politics. That may not mean that Mitchell, a Madison Fire Department lieutenant and statewide union leader, runs. But it should suggest that this contest does not have to be defined by narrow notions of politics.

There are plenty of prospects ? former University of Wisconsin Chancellor John Wiley, Epic Systems founder Judy Faulkner, former Assembly Speaker Tom Loftus ? who could be considered by Democrats.

And remember, Walker could face a Republican primary. Just imagine if state Sen.

Dale Schultz, R-Richland Center, decided to lead the charge to take his party back from the extremists.

Recall elections are supposed to open up the process, to spark the political imagination. That’s what’s happening in Wisconsin, where we have always known that the cure for what ails democracy is more democracy.

from:  http://www.fireengineering.com/news/2011/11/1531741779/how-the-recall-opens-up-politics.html

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using the number/letter grid:
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

   1  6    9    5        21

Mahlon Mitchell                64

4 83 5 4 238 33   43

 

his soul number = 21 = Seeing the big picture.  On the world stage.  For all the world to see.

his outer personality = 43 = Friends.  Colleagues.  Peers.  Groups.  Crowds.  Celebrating.  Congratulations.  Good times.

his path of destiny = 64 = Putting an end to [the Walker governorship].

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Mahlon Mitchell

4              38533

 

the most important thing he can do (MC), what he must do/has to do (ML), and how he obtains his heart’s desire (ML) all = 43 = Friends.  Colleagues.  Peers.  Groups.  Crowds.  Celebrating.  Congratulations.  Good times.

how he appears to the world = MH = 48 = Purpose.  Guidance.  Direction.  Mission.  Doing what he is here to do.  His calling in life.

what he likes/enjoys = Intense.  Focused.  Hardworking.  Common sense.  True grit.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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