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Archive for the ‘46 (Six of Cups)’ Category

Bio: Melissa Roy works at Masonite International Corporation, a door-manufacturing company, according to her Facebook page.

from:  http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/lac-megantic-faces/

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Melissa Roy

4539111 967             46

 

her path of destiny = 46 = So young.

Six of Cups Tarot card

 

RIP

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green_money

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predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

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——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/4317439

51 book cover

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Read Full Post »

July 12, 2013            11:14AM

IN a massive blow for New South Wales captain Paul Gallen has been ruled out of the State of Origin decider.

Wests Tigers skipper Robbie Farah will now lead the Blues into battle at ANZ Stadium on Wednesday night.

Aaron Woods, who made his debut in New South Wales’ 26-6 defeat in Brisbane, comes into the 17-man squad.

NSW coach Laurie Daley called a team huddle at training where he broke the news to his players and Woods was hugged and high-fived by his Blues teammates following his promotion

It was expected that Gallen would be given until Sunday to prove his fitness but it was apparent he would be unable to overcome his foot injury he sustained in the second Origin clash at Suncorp Stadium.

Both he and and Greg Bird showed up to camp wearing moonboots to help them overcome their injuries and while team doctor Nathan Gibbs yesterday said he was confident Bird would be ready to play he remained doubtful about Gallen.

Daley while disappointed about his captain’s withdrawal, still had the utmost confidence in his players to win the series for the first time since 2005.

“It’s obviously a blow for us to lose Gallen but we will have 17 fit players going into the decider and we will be ready to do the job,” Daley said.

from:  http://www.news.com.au/sport/nrl/paul-gallen-ruled-out-of-the-state-of-origin-decider/story-fndv2twz-1226678359854

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Robbie Farah was born on January 23rd, 1984 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robbie_Farah

January 23rd, 1984

1 + 23 +1+9+8+4 = 46 = his life lesson = It’s my time.  Making history.

Six of Cups Tarot card

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green_money

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undefined

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undefined

predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

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—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/4317439

51 book cover

Read Full Post »

Brian Jones was born on February 28th, 1942 and died on July 3rd, 1969 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Jones

February 28th, 1942

2 + 28 +1+9+4+2 = 46 = his life lesson = So young.  Age 27.

Six of Cups Tarot card

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July 3rd, 1969

February 28th, 1942

February 28th

2 + 28 +1+9+6+9 = 55 = his personal year (from February 28th, 1969 to February 27th, 1970) = Bad idea.

Ace of Swords Tarot card

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Brian Jones

29915 16551            44

 

his path of destiny = 44 = I am who I am.  It is what it is.

Four of Cups Tarot card

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predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/4317439

Read Full Post »

Daniel Huf, Michael Crawford

July 06, 2013            10:11PM

UNDERTAKER Michael Crawford bent down to the body on the road. Caucasian male, he noted. About 30. Severe facial injuries. Already declared dead. Nobody injured in a car smash like that could have survived.

He tied to the man’s wrist a tag handwritten with a number the coroner had given to him on the phone half an hour earlier. It read: “1195/2012”. Daniel Huf had become a statistic.

At first, there was no rush, just helplessness, a broken body, a wrecked car and a mess to clean up. Another solemn job at an ungodly hour — 3am on April 1 last year.

Crawford went to the crash scene at Bacchus Marsh on the Western Highway that night. He’d pulled up in the Charles Crawford & Sons silver wagon, lay a body bag by Daniel’s side and slipped that tag on his wrist.

But there was concern. The ambos had come and gone. They’d found no pulse in his body, still strapped in the driver’s seat of his upturned car. Yet, still the SES and CFA men had spotted movement under the blue tarp. Like he was twitching, his chest moved up and down spasmodically, irregularly.

“Have you ever seen this before?” Crawford was asked.

He looked at them, an eyebrow raised. One of them felt for a wrist pulse. There was a faint bump-bump, bump-bump. The other did the same. Felt the same.

The undertaker was supposed to put the man into that body bag and into his wagon. He was supposed to drive him to the Bacchus Marsh hospital for a doctor to sign the certificate of his death.

Instead, at 3am on April 1, 2012, Crawford uttered exactly what everyone else there had been thinking.

“Look fellas, I think I’m going to have a real hard time having him certified dead,” he said.

Huf accident scene

The accident scene where Daniel Huf was presumed dead.

“He needs an ambulance, not an undertaker. I can only take dead people.”

DANIEL Huf started working back at his old job at City Peugeot as a car detailer last week. After work he catches the train home to his apartment north of the Melbourne CBD to prepare his dinner. He has never felt more alive.

For a year and three months he has been the object of a major medical reconstruction which is not yet over. A “work in progress” he calls himself.

His face was smashed beyond recognition. (Someone from the crash scene was heard to say they’d seen better-looking corpses.) That he could even have taken in air that night through the mess of shattered facial bones and a face nearly ripped from his head defies belief.

No wonder his parents, Lutheran Pastor Colin and Betty Huf, think it’s a gift from God they still have their eldest son. And his bumped-about brain took some recovering to get back to this place.

At the kitchen table with his parents, he has a laugh about now having a perfect excuse for forgetting things. Joking he’s now more like a little brother to his little brother. Still lamenting the passing of his beloved Porsche. It was a write-off even if Daniel wasn’t.

Wondering for what purpose he was spared. (“I haven’t worked it out yet. I’m feeling the pressure.”)

At full speed his car’s nose clipped the back of a car he was approaching as he tried to pass it on his way back to Melbourne from Ballarat. The impact flipped his car on to its roof and he hurtled along the barriers at the centre of the road. His face connected with the top metal wire of that fence. Or with part of his Porsche. Nobody knows exactly what did the damage.

His brain had suffered damage from both the trauma of the impact and lack of oxygen. When Epworth medical director John Olver first met Daniel he was suffering post-traumatic amnesia. That continued for 93 days after his accident. (Anything longer than a month of amnesia shows severe brain damage.)

Despite that damage, Olver was heartened to see his patient’s personality emerge, to see he could live independently and was able to drive again.

Daniel remembers the moment when he emerged from the fog, on day 93. An Epworth nurse was asking him: “Do you know where you are, Daniel? Do you know why you’re here?”

It is a question nurses caring for brain-damaged patients ask them over and over again, sometimes for months before getting a bite.

Finally the penny dropped.

“No I don’t,” he tells the nurse. “What happened?”

“You were badly injured in a car accident. You nearly died,” he remembers her telling him.

He asked her whether he was in his Porsche when it happened. When she told him yes, he started crying.

SINCE Daniel was a kid he wanted his own Porsche. More than anything else. Everybody told him he’d have to be a doctor when he grew up to afford one of those.

He’d spend his spare time doodling various Porsche models and counting how many he passed on road trips. Once, between Adelaide and their home town of Tarrington near Hamilton, he spotted 16. “That was a good trip,” he laughs.

Daniel didn’t become a doctor. Still, he bought his dream car four years ago — a 1981 turbo-charged Porsche 924. It was first registered in the same year he was born.

It was a beauty. With an engine in the front and its gearbox in the back, it handled superbly. It had everything he needed. Except air bags. At the time he bought it, he didn’t know how handy they’d have been.

They might have made a big difference. They might have saved him from being nearly dead.

Royal Melbourne Hospital oral and maxillofacial surgeon Patrishia Bordbar knows Daniel’s injuries intimately. When she first saw him 24 hours after the crash it looked like he had been blasted in the face with a shotgun.

His bottom jaw was busted in six places, sections were missing, many of his teeth were knocked out, he had broken eye sockets, cheek and nasal bones. Bits of Porsche and debris were embedded in his wound.

Since then, he has been in surgery 10 times for a total of more than 30 hours – initially just keeping him alive, then later reconstructing his face.

Bordbar’s trauma work is often compared with putting a jigsaw puzzle together. With Daniel, many of the pieces were missing. She did the first repair work through the wounds in his neck. She waited 10 months before giving Daniel his major reconstruction.

He still has more bone grafts, dental implants and plastic surgery ahead.

“When I looked at the first scans of Daniel, I thought: “Where do I start?” Bordbar recalls.

“But Daniel is the perfect example of why we should never make a judgment about how well someone can repair, survive, simply by how badly injured they look.”

BETTY Huf works at a school for children with special needs. She and Colin had to wait two days before RMH intensive care doctors could predict Daniel would survive. But nobody knew how much “Daniel” would be left.

He spent two weeks in the ICU and then moved to the ward for four weeks. While he was there, Betty brought in a stress ball for him to roll around in his palm and squeeze. They used them with kids at her work sometimes.

She’d play with it at his ICU bedside and bounce it. Daniel, his head still swollen, fed through a tube straight into his stomach and still unable to speak took the ball from her and threw it against the wall.

Then, before he can even remember, on Anzac Day, Daniel wrote a note to thank an uncle and aunt for visiting him in hospital. “That’s when I really knew he was going to be OK,”‘ Betty recalls. “I knew how much reasoning power was needed to do those things. We’d still have our Daniel.”

Pastor Colin doesn’t believe in grudges. Besides, to him there was no blame to attach to the paramedics who first arrived at the scene and declared his son dead.

In his opinion, they did their best with Daniel.

“If they had been allowed to stay, things might have been different. They conducted eight tests to find signs of life and for each of those tests the result was negative.

“Clearly the thread of life was too fine then for even the medical experts to pick up,” Pastor Colin says.

Looking over the spot of the Western Highway where the accident happened, on the top of a hill, is a cross. It stands now as a sign to his parents: God was looking out for Daniel; he was meant to survive, with or without the help of humans.

When the paramedics returned to the scene, minutes after that faint pulse was found, they were surprised.

Crawford describes how quickly and gently he was loaded into the ambulance. The scene regained its urgency. And Pastor Colin believes from then they helped save his life. A CFA officer drove the vehicle to the hospital so both paramedics could find a way to help Daniel take the breaths his body was fighting for.

“I don’t blame them. I thank them for helping to save his life and bring him back,” he says.

THE weeks after Daniel shed the first tears for his written-off Porsche, were confusing. There were important things to figure out: How come Hirdy is coaching his beloved Bombers? Last thing he remembers, he was playing for them.

Daniel, now 32, lost three years of his life on the night of his crash, which he bluntly calls the night “my Porsche and I died”.

Little bits come back to him of those three years, but mostly he has to trust what people around are telling him.

On Monday, Daniel met his undertaker on the median strip of the Western Highway where the smash happened. The two men stood silently for a moment, one that only a handful like them have surely ever shared. Crawford handed over that wrist tag. Something else for the scrap book.

They shook hands, broken cubes of his windscreen scrunching underfoot where the upturned Porsche came to rest. As Daniel glanced down he noticed a black and silver bracelet in the gravel.

“Hey, that’s mine. Maybe I’ll be able to find some of my teeth, too, for the tooth fairy,” Daniel says.

As photographs were taken, Crawford stood back and watched this man who they never expected would make it.

The undertaker, a smile constantly in his eyes, thought to himself again how glad he was the mission had failed. He felt lucky to have been given that early-morning job to collect this man — the man whose number wasn’t up.

from:  http://www.heraldsun.com.au/national-news/victoria/car-crash-victim-daniel-huf-back-from-the-dead/story-fnii5sms-1226675362823#ixzz2YJ9m7peD

———————————————————————————–

using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Michael Crawford

4                    6

 

how it appears to the world = MF = 46 = His time wasn’t up yet.

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—————————————————————————————–

predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/4317439

Read Full Post »

Daniel Huf

July 06, 2013            10:11PM

UNDERTAKER Michael Crawford bent down to the body on the road. Caucasian male, he noted. About 30. Severe facial injuries. Already declared dead. Nobody injured in a car smash like that could have survived.

He tied to the man’s wrist a tag handwritten with a number the coroner had given to him on the phone half an hour earlier. It read: “1195/2012”. Daniel Huf had become a statistic.

At first, there was no rush, just helplessness, a broken body, a wrecked car and a mess to clean up. Another solemn job at an ungodly hour — 3am on April 1 last year.

Crawford went to the crash scene at Bacchus Marsh on the Western Highway that night. He’d pulled up in the Charles Crawford & Sons silver wagon, lay a body bag by Daniel’s side and slipped that tag on his wrist.

But there was concern. The ambos had come and gone. They’d found no pulse in his body, still strapped in the driver’s seat of his upturned car. Yet, still the SES and CFA men had spotted movement under the blue tarp. Like he was twitching, his chest moved up and down spasmodically, irregularly.

“Have you ever seen this before?” Crawford was asked.

He looked at them, an eyebrow raised. One of them felt for a wrist pulse. There was a faint bump-bump, bump-bump. The other did the same. Felt the same.

The undertaker was supposed to put the man into that body bag and into his wagon. He was supposed to drive him to the Bacchus Marsh hospital for a doctor to sign the certificate of his death.

Instead, at 3am on April 1, 2012, Crawford uttered exactly what everyone else there had been thinking.

“Look fellas, I think I’m going to have a real hard time having him certified dead,” he said.

Huf accident scene

The accident scene where Daniel Huf was presumed dead.

“He needs an ambulance, not an undertaker. I can only take dead people.”

DANIEL Huf started working back at his old job at City Peugeot as a car detailer last week. After work he catches the train home to his apartment north of the Melbourne CBD to prepare his dinner. He has never felt more alive.

For a year and three months he has been the object of a major medical reconstruction which is not yet over. A “work in progress” he calls himself.

His face was smashed beyond recognition. (Someone from the crash scene was heard to say they’d seen better-looking corpses.) That he could even have taken in air that night through the mess of shattered facial bones and a face nearly ripped from his head defies belief.

No wonder his parents, Lutheran Pastor Colin and Betty Huf, think it’s a gift from God they still have their eldest son. And his bumped-about brain took some recovering to get back to this place.

At the kitchen table with his parents, he has a laugh about now having a perfect excuse for forgetting things. Joking he’s now more like a little brother to his little brother. Still lamenting the passing of his beloved Porsche. It was a write-off even if Daniel wasn’t.

Wondering for what purpose he was spared. (“I haven’t worked it out yet. I’m feeling the pressure.”)

At full speed his car’s nose clipped the back of a car he was approaching as he tried to pass it on his way back to Melbourne from Ballarat. The impact flipped his car on to its roof and he hurtled along the barriers at the centre of the road. His face connected with the top metal wire of that fence. Or with part of his Porsche. Nobody knows exactly what did the damage.

His brain had suffered damage from both the trauma of the impact and lack of oxygen. When Epworth medical director John Olver first met Daniel he was suffering post-traumatic amnesia. That continued for 93 days after his accident. (Anything longer than a month of amnesia shows severe brain damage.)

Despite that damage, Olver was heartened to see his patient’s personality emerge, to see he could live independently and was able to drive again.

Daniel remembers the moment when he emerged from the fog, on day 93. An Epworth nurse was asking him: “Do you know where you are, Daniel? Do you know why you’re here?”

It is a question nurses caring for brain-damaged patients ask them over and over again, sometimes for months before getting a bite.

Finally the penny dropped.

“No I don’t,” he tells the nurse. “What happened?”

“You were badly injured in a car accident. You nearly died,” he remembers her telling him.

He asked her whether he was in his Porsche when it happened. When she told him yes, he started crying.

SINCE Daniel was a kid he wanted his own Porsche. More than anything else. Everybody told him he’d have to be a doctor when he grew up to afford one of those.

He’d spend his spare time doodling various Porsche models and counting how many he passed on road trips. Once, between Adelaide and their home town of Tarrington near Hamilton, he spotted 16. “That was a good trip,” he laughs.

Daniel didn’t become a doctor. Still, he bought his dream car four years ago — a 1981 turbo-charged Porsche 924. It was first registered in the same year he was born.

It was a beauty. With an engine in the front and its gearbox in the back, it handled superbly. It had everything he needed. Except air bags. At the time he bought it, he didn’t know how handy they’d have been.

They might have made a big difference. They might have saved him from being nearly dead.

Royal Melbourne Hospital oral and maxillofacial surgeon Patrishia Bordbar knows Daniel’s injuries intimately. When she first saw him 24 hours after the crash it looked like he had been blasted in the face with a shotgun.

His bottom jaw was busted in six places, sections were missing, many of his teeth were knocked out, he had broken eye sockets, cheek and nasal bones. Bits of Porsche and debris were embedded in his wound.

Since then, he has been in surgery 10 times for a total of more than 30 hours – initially just keeping him alive, then later reconstructing his face.

Bordbar’s trauma work is often compared with putting a jigsaw puzzle together. With Daniel, many of the pieces were missing. She did the first repair work through the wounds in his neck. She waited 10 months before giving Daniel his major reconstruction.

He still has more bone grafts, dental implants and plastic surgery ahead.

“When I looked at the first scans of Daniel, I thought: “Where do I start?” Bordbar recalls.

“But Daniel is the perfect example of why we should never make a judgment about how well someone can repair, survive, simply by how badly injured they look.”

BETTY Huf works at a school for children with special needs. She and Colin had to wait two days before RMH intensive care doctors could predict Daniel would survive. But nobody knew how much “Daniel” would be left.

He spent two weeks in the ICU and then moved to the ward for four weeks. While he was there, Betty brought in a stress ball for him to roll around in his palm and squeeze. They used them with kids at her work sometimes.

She’d play with it at his ICU bedside and bounce it. Daniel, his head still swollen, fed through a tube straight into his stomach and still unable to speak took the ball from her and threw it against the wall.

Then, before he can even remember, on Anzac Day, Daniel wrote a note to thank an uncle and aunt for visiting him in hospital. “That’s when I really knew he was going to be OK,”‘ Betty recalls. “I knew how much reasoning power was needed to do those things. We’d still have our Daniel.”

Pastor Colin doesn’t believe in grudges. Besides, to him there was no blame to attach to the paramedics who first arrived at the scene and declared his son dead.

In his opinion, they did their best with Daniel.

“If they had been allowed to stay, things might have been different. They conducted eight tests to find signs of life and for each of those tests the result was negative.

“Clearly the thread of life was too fine then for even the medical experts to pick up,” Pastor Colin says.

Looking over the spot of the Western Highway where the accident happened, on the top of a hill, is a cross. It stands now as a sign to his parents: God was looking out for Daniel; he was meant to survive, with or without the help of humans.

When the paramedics returned to the scene, minutes after that faint pulse was found, they were surprised.

Crawford describes how quickly and gently he was loaded into the ambulance. The scene regained its urgency. And Pastor Colin believes from then they helped save his life. A CFA officer drove the vehicle to the hospital so both paramedics could find a way to help Daniel take the breaths his body was fighting for.

“I don’t blame them. I thank them for helping to save his life and bring him back,” he says.

THE weeks after Daniel shed the first tears for his written-off Porsche, were confusing. There were important things to figure out: How come Hirdy is coaching his beloved Bombers? Last thing he remembers, he was playing for them.

Daniel, now 32, lost three years of his life on the night of his crash, which he bluntly calls the night “my Porsche and I died”.

Little bits come back to him of those three years, but mostly he has to trust what people around are telling him.

On Monday, Daniel met his undertaker on the median strip of the Western Highway where the smash happened. The two men stood silently for a moment, one that only a handful like them have surely ever shared. Crawford handed over that wrist tag. Something else for the scrap book.

They shook hands, broken cubes of his windscreen scrunching underfoot where the upturned Porsche came to rest. As Daniel glanced down he noticed a black and silver bracelet in the gravel.

“Hey, that’s mine. Maybe I’ll be able to find some of my teeth, too, for the tooth fairy,” Daniel says.

As photographs were taken, Crawford stood back and watched this man who they never expected would make it.

The undertaker, a smile constantly in his eyes, thought to himself again how glad he was the mission had failed. He felt lucky to have been given that early-morning job to collect this man — the man whose number wasn’t up.

from:  http://www.heraldsun.com.au/national-news/victoria/car-crash-victim-daniel-huf-back-from-the-dead/story-fnii5sms-1226675362823#ixzz2YJ9m7peD

———————————————————————————–

using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Daniel Huf

4             6

 

how he obtains his heart’s desire = DF = 46 = My time’s not up yet.

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—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/4317439

Read Full Post »

Madelyn Sheaffer

07/03/2013           2:24 pm EDT

Missouri calls itself the “Show Me” state, but there’s only so much one woman was allowed to show at a water park.

When Madelyn Sheaffer went to the Adventure Oasis Water Park in Independence, Mo., on Tuesday, the last thing she expected was that her bathing suit would cause fireworks.

Sheaffer, 43, said after she got into the pool with her niece and nephew, two teenage employees approached her and told her to put on shorts because her bottoms were too small.

A supervisor backed up their decree by saying she needed to cover up or leave the park.

“I just felt like I was singled out,” Sheaffer told KSHB-TV. “I felt like it was both age and body discrimination and I felt like I could look around me and I could see a handful of other girls half my age, wearing the same size swimming suit and not being singled out and told to put on clothes or leave.”

Sheaffer then asked that the water park officials call the police to have her removed so that she could file a complaint against the park. On her Facebook page, she wrote that the officers who showed up sympathized with her plight:

“We can’t actually say anything,” they said as we walked outside, (as it is a city owned park), ..but I hope from the expressions on our face you can tell how we feel,” They were compassionate. They too, thought it was ridiculous.

Officials at the Adventure Oasis Water Park had no comment about the incident preferring to have the Independence, Mo., City Manager handle press inquiries since the park is on city land.

The City Manager was unavailable, but an assistant said that “the facility made the call and we rely on their judgment.”

Sheaffer is not the only person fighting for her freedoms around July 4.

Last week, Mike McKeown protested being kicked out of a bar because the owners didn’t like his many tattoos, particularly the one on his neck reading “I Love Strippers.”

McKeown said he would have put on a shirt, but wants the bar’s alleged rules against extreme tattoos to be applied to everyone.

from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/03/madelyn-sheaffer-bikini-water-park-banned_n_3541885.html?utm_hp_ref=mostpopular

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Madelyn Sheaffer

4                      6

 

how she appears to the world = MF = 46 = I could see a handful of other girls half my age, wearing the same size swimming suit.

Six of Cups Tarot card

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predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/4317439

51 book cover

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July 1, 2013            6:47 p.m.

The so-called hotshots were remembered as a rambunctious but respectful bunch: pranksters, sometimes, but dedicated and energetic professionals.

Their boss, Prescott Fire Chief Dan Fraijo, grew apprehensive Sunday as another official told him Prescott’s elite Granite Mountain Interagency Hotshot Crew had dug in to escape the wind-driven Yarnell Hill wildfire.

“All he said was, ‘We might have bad news. The entire hotshot crew deployed their shelters,’ ” Fraijo recalled Monday.

The worst was soon confirmed: All but one member of the 20-man crew died after being overrun by the fire, which destroyed 200 buildings in the small town of Yarnell and exceeded 8,000 acres by Monday.

The tragedy reverberated through Prescott and beyond, as portraits of the lost Prescott crew took shape and the town took its first steps toward mourning the dead.

About half a dozen people gathered on the steps of the county courthouse in downtown Prescott on Monday afternoon to pray for the fallen firefighters, for those left injured and homeless by the blaze and for those still fighting the conflagration.

They also prayed for rain.

“What we’d love to see for our firefighters and the town of Yarnell is more rain and lots of it — and preferably less wind,” said the Rev. Scott Mitchell of The Church Next Door. As the people bowed their heads and consulted their Bibles, fire trucks sped by, “Flagstaff Hot Shots” emblazoned on several vehicles.

“That’s the road to Yarnell,” said the Rev. Dave Barreras, 46, leader of the Yavapai Territorial Gospel Rescue Mission.

But Prescott had no more firefighters to send. Its only wildland team was gone.

The hotshot crew victims were all men, most in their 20s.

“It’s a younger man’s game. These people keep themselves in exceptional condition,” said Fraijo, who added, “I never heard them complain…. They always showed a great deal of respect. They always seemed to be playing pranks on each other, and a few on me.”

The deceased were Andrew Ashcraft, 29; Robert Caldwell, 23; Travis Carder, 31; Dustin Deford, 24; Christopher MacKenzie, 30; Eric Marsh, 43; Grant McKee, 21; Sean Misner, 26; Scott Norris, 28; Wade Parker, 22; John Percin, 24; Anthony Rose, 23; Jesse Steed, 36; Joe Thurston, 32; Travis Turbyfill, 27; William Warneke, 25; Clayton Whitted, 28; Kevin Woyjeck, 21; and Garret Zuppiger, 27.

At least three hailed from Southern California: Woyjeck from Seal Beach and Warneke and MacKenzie from Hemet.

The identity of the crew member who survived has not been released.

“He’s well; he had been assigned to do a function and he wasn’t with them when they had deployed to shelter,” Fraijo said. “He feels terribly, and we all feel terribly, and we have very few words that express that sort of sorry. When you take a person in your arms and hug ’em, you know, you don’t have to say too much.”

Dennis Godfrey, a spokesman with the federal Bureau of Land Management, said officials had expected that 400 firefighters would be on duty Monday, but only 280 were on the lines by afternoon.

Godfrey said officials were hoping for more but didn’t know when, or whether, they would arrive. “There are fires elsewhere,” Godfrey said. “We only have so many resources to deal with.”

Thunderheads built over Prescott on Monday, delivering thunder, lightning and heavy rain by midday. But by 3:30 p.m., none of the rain had hit the fire area.

The blaze was sparked by a lightning strike Friday, officials said.

In a sprawling gymnasium on a college campus in Prescott, cots were set up and meals were being served for those who fled the raging wildfire. Between 40 and 50 people had registered at the facility, organized by the Red Cross, and more were expected by nightfall, said Michele Maki of the Red Cross.

Shelters had also been organized in Wickenburg and Kingman.

“It’s been a very busy day for the Red Cross,” Maki said. The shelters are meant to serve not only as a place to eat or rest, she said, but also as a place to seek emotional and spiritual help from counselors and chaplains.

“For these people, it’s very personal,” Maki said.

Kathy Bryan of Williamson Valley said the members of the fire crew who perished helped save her home from the Doce blaze after it flared up June 18 in the Granite Mountain Wilderness, northwest of Prescott. That’s roughly 20 miles north of the Yarnell Hill fire.

“These hotshots were on our properties, saving them … saving my house,” Bryan said. “It’s heartbreaking.”

Bryan and her dogs fled her home before the blaze approached. Soon Bryan’s cousin called, letting her know that the wife of one of the hotshots fighting the blaze had offered Bryan a place to stay. That woman is now a widow, Bryan said.

Now Bryan believes it’s her turn to help. “I need to find out what she needs,” Bryan said she told her cousin. “What can I do for her?”

In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, U.S. Army Sgt. T.J. Ashcraft said one of the dead firefighters was his younger brother Andrew, who was a good man and a good father to his four children.

“We always kind of pushed each other in good ways,” said Ashcraft, 32. “He went the firefighter route and I went the military route.”

Another dead firefighter, Anthony Rose, was expecting his first child with his fiancee, according to family friend Phyllis Barney of Glendale, Ariz.

Barney’s family met Rose in the small Arizona town of Crown King, southeast of Prescott, when Rose moved there at age 16. In Crown King, Rose earned his GED online and went to work for the local fire department.

“Just getting notifications that an entire crew is killed … is a little difficult to handle when they’re your own and whatnot,” Barney said. “But when you’ve got one that really was kind of your own … it’s even tougher.”

The firefighters’ bodies were taken to the Maricopa County medical examiner’s office in Phoenix on Monday, and it was not clear when they would be returned to Prescott. Officials were still deciding when to hold a formal memorial service.

Some of the cirumstances of the crew’s plight came into slightly sharper focus Monday, although officials cautioned that it could be a couple of days before more preliminary information was available while investigators picked through the disaster area.

Before the flames overtook the firefighters, a thunderstorm cell had moved into their location west of state Highway 89 between Yarnell and Peeples Valley, fire officials said.

The storm created strong and erratic winds in an area described as extremely rocky, with rough terrain and deep canyons. The gusts pushed the flames toward the hotshots, who were trying to create a firebreak in hopes of stopping the flames’ advance, said Wade Ward, a spokesman for the Prescott Fire Department.

As the winds shifted and fire approached, the men were probably trying to get to safety — usually a clearing, Ward said.

“It had to be a perfect storm” for them to have deployed their fire shelters — a last-ditch effort made in desperate situations, he said. Officials lost contact with the crew about 4:30 p.m. Sunday.

“Obviously wherever they deployed their shelters, they were too close to heavy fuels, so they got overrun,” said Art Morrison, a fire spokesman with the Arizona State Forestry Division.

Ward knew the men, calling them “brothers.” He described the elite team  as “very cautious” and “very conservative.”

Wade Parker, 22, of Chino Valley, about 30 miles north of Prescott, was another of the victims.

Parker’s 14-year-old cousin, Hailey McMains, viewed him as a big brother. “After church, we would find a place to sit and talk about life,” Hailey said. Wade would ask her: “’Anything we need to pray for, Hailey?’ If I was having a bad week, we’d pray about that.”

Hailey said Wade and his high school sweetheart planned to marry in October. They had been together six years, she said.

She was at the home of an aunt and uncle Sunday evening when she heard on the news that some firefighters had died. “I asked my aunt, ‘Is Wade OK?’” Hailey said.

Her aunt put her fingers to her lips and said: “Sssssshhhhhhh,” pointing to one of Wade’s young nephews.

“A little while later, as I was leaving, she whispered, ‘Wade didn’t make it, Hailey,’ ” the girl recalled. “I cried all night long.”

from:  http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-ff-yarnell-firefighters-afternoon-20130701,0,6877537.story

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Dustin Deford

4            4

 

how it appears to the world = DF = 46 = So young.  Age 24.

 

RIP

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predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/4317439

Read Full Post »

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