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Archive for the ‘China’ Category

Xi Mingze

00:00 EST            15 November 2012

He has just become the most powerful military leader-elect to the most populous country in the world, and yet there are details that remain unknown about China’s new president, Xi Jinpig.

While it is known is that he is married to the honey-voiced megastar of popular Chinese folk music, Peng Liyuan, and they have only one child together, details of their daughter’s life are few and far between.

Their 20-year-old daughter, Xi Mingze, is currently attending Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, though little is known about China’s new First Daughter.

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Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping emerges as the head of the newly reshuffled seven member Communist Party of China Politburo Standing Committee,
Power couple: Xi Jinping is married to Peng Liyuan, the syrup-voiced megastar of popular Chinese folk music

Power couple: China’s new president Xi Jinping is married to Peng Liyuan, the syrup-voiced megastar of popular Chinese folk music

 

Ms Xi reportedly transferred to Harvard two years ago and is surrounded by Chinese security at all timesMs Xi reportedly transferred to Harvard two years ago and is surrounded by Chinese security at all times

New home: Kappa Alpha Theta sorority's house is seen on the Harvard campus where she is said to often studyNew home: Kappa Alpha Theta sorority’s house is seen on the Harvard campus where she is said to often study

It is believed that Ms Xi has been studying at the Ivy League school since transferring in two years ago after going to school in China.

She studies under a pseudonym so as not to attract undue attention.

THE PEONY FAIRY: FROM SHOWBIZ SUPERSTAR TO CHINA’S FIRST LADY

Ms. Peng, a legendary singer who is known to hundreds of millions of Chinese for her annual New Year s Eve performances on state television
  • Born in 1962, Peng Liyuan is a Chinese folk singer and actress
  • She has been married to Xi Jinping for 25 years with whom she has a daughter, Xi Mingze, 20
  • The couple are said to have met through friends in the mid 1980s
  • Nicknamed The Peony Fairy, she hasgraced television screens in China for more than a decade, her honeyed tones punctuating state-run TV shows and Communist Party rallies
  • She is best known for her propagandist ballads including Plains of Hope and People From Our Village
  • She joined the People’s Liberation Army aged 18 and rose to the civilian rank of major-general, a post she still holds
  • She has performed all over the world, including, New York, Tokyo and Vienna
  • In June 2011, she was even appointed World Health Organisation Goodwill Ambassador for HIV/Aids and tuberculosis

It is rumored that she is surrounded by a staff of Chinese bodyguards 24 hours a day.

The Washington Post reported last May that she joined Kappa Alpha Theta sorority and is described by peers at the school as ‘studious and discreet.’

She often studies at the sorority house and speaks with unaccented English.

Her name, Mingze, denotes innocence and ‘moral probity,’ Asia Time noted in 2007, speaking of how Xi’s ascent into China’s highest office could see a sort of parallel to the White House in terms of a father showing affection for his wife and children.

She isn’t the only progeny of China’s political leaders to attend the American institution. Bo Guagua, the only son of embattled politician Bo Xilai, also attended the institution and had a playboy ‘princeling’ reputation while at the school.

Ms Peng has become China’s first high-profile political spouse since Jiang Qing, the late wife of Chairman Mao Zedong.

Her huge success in the entertainment industry has run alongside her staunch loyalty to the Communist Party.

She joined the People’s Liberation Army aged 18 and rose to the rank of major-general, a post she still holds.

But when her superiors discovered her talent for singing, she began touring army bases serenading troops in a program designed to boost morale.

The Peony Fairy: Ms Peng had graced television screens in the world's most populous country for more than a decade, her honeyed tones punctuating state-run TV shows and Communist Party ralliesThe Peony Fairy: Ms Peng had graced television screens in the world’s most populous country for more than a decade, her honeyed tones punctuating state-run TV shows and Communist Party rallies

The new team: He and the six other men who will form China's new collective leadership, all dressed in dark suits, walked in line onto the red-carpeted stage

The new team: He and the six other men who will form China’s new collective leadership, all dressed in dark suits, walked in line onto the red-carpeted stage. (L-R) Liu Yunshan, Zhang Dejiang, Xi Jinping, Li Keqiang, Yu Zhengsheng and Wang Qishan.

Get used to this face: Xi's inaugural address as the country's new leader was broadcast on giant screens across China. Here, above a McDonald's in BeijingGet used to this face: Xi’s inaugural address as the country’s new leader was broadcast on giant screens across China. Here, above a McDonald’s in Beijing

 

From there her rise to fame was meteoric. She is best known for performing at CCTV’s New Year’s Gala – a show watched by hundreds of millions of people throughout China – almost every year since its inception in 1982.

Almost all of her songs are in praise of the Communist Party and frequently appears on state television to sing propagandist ballads with names including Plains of Hope and People From Our Village.

In June 2011, she was even appointed World Health Organisation Goodwill Ambassador for HIV/Aids and tuberculosis.

She has also shied away from appearing in public with her husband or talking about their relationship until recently, fuelling speculation that she may take a more active role in his presidency than any of her predecessors.

New leader: Xi Jinping became China's new leader Thursday, assuming the top posts in the Communist Party and the powerful military New leader: Xi Jinping became China’s new leader Thursday, assuming the top posts in the Communist Party and the powerful military

Hall of the People: The announcement was rubber stamped as the final day of the week-long congress drew to a close in the Great Hall of the PeopleHall of the People: The announcement was rubber stamped as the final day of the week-long congress drew to a close in the Great Hall of the People

Li Keqiang also is due to take over from Wen Jiabao as premier.
Li Keqiang also is due to take over from Wen Jiabao as premier.

Hello and goodbye: Li Keqiang, left, also is due to take over from Wen Jiabao, right, as premier

In a rare interview in 2007, she told a state-run magazine: ‘When he comes home, I’ve never thought of it as though there’s some leader in the house.

He is married to a popstar called Peng Liyuan who, for most of Xi’s career, has been more famous than him.

Chinese often tell a well-known joke: ‘Who is Xi Jinping? Why, he is the husband of Peng Liyuan.’

He is the son of Communist revolutionary general Xi Zhongxun, a comrade of Chairman Mao.

But when he was in his teens, his father fell out with the Chairman and was sent to prison.

Xi was exiled to a far-flung, rural community of Liangjiahe, in Shaanxi province, where he lived in cave-dwellings and was forced to labour in the fields.

Little more than 100 miles from Beijing, it is one of China’s poorest regions.

The family lived like peasants in a cave-like house carved out of the yellow rock formations that surrounded the village.

He is quoted as saying no problems he has encountered in political life compare to the hardship he suffered as a young man.

After leaving Liangjiahe, Xi headed to the busy coastal provinces that form China’s industrial heartland.

He quickly climbed the ranks to become the most senior party official first in Fujian, before Zhejiang and finally Shanghai.

There he developed the mind for business and economics that he is known for today.

Now with exports and the economy slowing, China hopes his skills can help get the nation back on track to overtaking America and becoming the biggest economy in the world.

‘In my eyes, he’s just my husband. When I get home, he doesn’t think of me as some famous star. In his eyes, I’m simply his wife.’

But while hers is still one of the most famous faces in the country, comparatively little is known of her husband, a man who spent most of his teens living in a cave, labouring in the fields of one of China’s poorest regions.

He is the son of Communist revolutionary general Xi Zhongxun, a comrade of Chairman Mao.

But when he was in his teens, his father fell out with the Chairman and was sent to prison.

Xi was exiled to a far-flung, rural community of Liangjiahe, in Shaanxi province, where he lived in cave-dwellings and was forced to labour in the fields. Little more than 100 miles from Beijing, it is one of China’s poorest regions.

The family lived like peasants in a cave-like house carved out of the yellow rock formations that surrounded the village.

He is quoted as saying no problems he has encountered in political life compare to the hardship he suffered as a young man.

But he immersed himself in local politics and soon rose the ranks before today assuming the top posts in the Communist Party and the powerful military in a political transition unbowed by scandals, a slower economy and public demands for reforms.

Xi was introduced as the new party general secretary at Beijing’s Great Hall of the People a day after the close of a week-long party congress that underlined the communists’ determination to remain firmly in power.

The once-a-decade leadership change was carefully choreographed. It became clear Xi would lead China five years ago, when he was appointed to the Standing Committee – the nation’s apex of power – as the highest-ranked member who would not be of retirement age this year.

Xi’s colleagues in the new Standing Committee are Li Keqiang, the presumptive premier and chief economic official; Vice Premier Zhang Dejiang; Shanghai party secretary Yu Zhengsheng; propaganda chief Liu Yunshan; Vice Premier Wang Qishan; and Tianjin party secretary Zhang Gaoli.

In a speech broadcast live on Chinese state TV and worldwide, Xi said, ‘We shall do everything we can to live up to your trust and fulfill our mission.’

from:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2234241/Xi-Mingze-China-s-new-daughter-attends-Harvard-pseudonym-protected-Chinese-officials.html

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Xi Mingze was born on June 27th, 1992 (time of birth unknown) in China? according to http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?id=20120216000104&cid=1601&MainCatID=16

[Uranus/Saturn = Mercury]

 

June 27th, 1992

6 + 27 +1+9+9+2 = 54 = her life lesson = Pseudonym.  Assumed identity.  Clever.  Thinking on her feet.  Mental dexterity.

Page of Swords Tarot card

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June 27th, 1992

June 27th

6 + 27 +2+0+1+2 = 38 = her personal year (from June 27th, 2012 to June 26th, 2013) = Taking care of herself.  Her mother (Peng Liyuan).  Bodyguards.  Being protected.  Being sheltered.

Queen of Cups Tarot card

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Xi Mingze

69 495785             53

 

her path of destiny = 53 = Debating.  Principles.  Religion.  Forthright.  Straightforward.  Straight to the point.

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Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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numerology for Friday December 21st, 2012 (the “end of the Mayan calendar”) at:

http://2012numerology.com/

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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predictions for the year 2013 are at:

http://predictionsyear2013.com/

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Tuesday September 25, 2012

He Zhi Hua, a villager in Changsha Village, China who tried to resist a forced government relocation, was crushed to death by a steamroller on the orders of a Chinese government official.

The story was censored in China’s state controlled media, but has caused outrage on Weibo, the Chinese version of Twitter, reports infowars.com.

Hua refused to accept a small payment from the government which has forcefully evicted locals in order use their land for commercial use.

Hua protested by lying down on the spot through which construction vehicles had to drive.That’s when the local Vice Mayor ordered workers to murder Hua by driving over his body with a steamroller.

To censor the story, the Chinese government sent in 200 men to keep angry locals at bay and hide the remains of the body. Hua’s family was offered money in order to keep quiet.

from:  http://www.opposingviews.com/i/society/crime/he-zhi-hua-crushed-steamroller-orders-chinese-officials

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

He Zhi Hua

85 889 831               50

 

his path of destiny = 50 =  Hua’s family was offered money in order to keep quiet.

Ten of Cups Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

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undefined

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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http://electionnumerology.com/

Read Full Post »

Xi Jinping 习近平

June 29, 2012              2:32 AM CT

Xi Jinping, the man in line to be China’s next president, warned officials on a 2004 anti-graft conference call: “Rein in your spouses, children, relatives, friends and staff, and vow not to use power for personal gain.”

As Xi climbed the Communist Party ranks, his extended family expanded their business interests to include minerals, real estate and mobile-phone equipment, according to public documents compiled by Bloomberg.

A screen grab shows the website of Hiconics Drive Technology Co. Source: http://www.hiconics.com via Bloomberg

Those interests include investments in companies with total assets of $376 million; an 18 percent indirect stake in a rare- earths company with $1.73 billion in assets; and a $20.2 million holding in a publicly traded technology company. The figures don’t account for liabilities and thus don’t reflect the family’s net worth.

No assets were traced to Xi, who turns 59 this month; his wife Peng Liyuan, 49, a famous People’s Liberation Army singer; or their daughter, the documents show. There is no indication Xi intervened to advance his relatives’ business transactions, or of any wrongdoing by Xi or his extended family.

While the investments are obscured from public view by multiple holding companies, government restrictions on access to company documents and in some cases online censorship, they are identified in thousands of pages of regulatory filings.

The trail also leads to a hillside villa overlooking the South China Sea in Hong Kong, with an estimated value of $31.5 million. The doorbell ringer dangles from its wires, and neighbors say the house has been empty for years. The family owns at least six other Hong Kong properties with a combined estimated value of $24.1 million.

Standing Committee

Xi has risen through the party over the past three decades, holding leadership positions in several provinces and joining the ruling Politburo Standing Committee in 2007. Along the way, he built a reputation for clean government.

He led an anti-graft campaign in the rich coastal province of Zhejiang, where he issued the “rein in” warning to officials in 2004, according to a People’s Daily publication. In Shanghai, he was brought in as party chief after a 3.7 billion- yuan ($582 million) scandal.

2009 cable from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing cited an acquaintance of Xi’s saying he wasn’t corrupt or driven by money. Xi was “repulsed by the all-encompassing commercialization of Chinese society, with its attendant nouveau riche, official corruption, loss of values, dignity, and self- respect,” the cable disclosed by Wikileaks said, citing the friend. Wikileaks publishes secret government documents online.

A U.S. government spokesman declined to comment on the document.

Carving Economy

Increasing resentment over China’s most powerful families carving up the spoils of economic growth poses a challenge for the Communist Party. The income gap in urban China has widened more than in any other country in Asia over the past 20 years, according to the International Monetary Fund.

“The average Chinese person gets angry when he hears about deals where people make hundreds of millions, or even billions of dollars, by trading on political influence,” said Barry Naughton, professor of Chinese economy at the University of California, San Diego, who wasn’t referring to the Xi family specifically.

Scrutiny of officials’ wealth is intensifying before a once-in-a-decade transition of power later this year, when Xi and the next generation of leaders are set to be promoted. The ouster in March of Bo Xilai as party chief of China’s biggest municipality in an alleged graft and murder scandal fueled public anger over cronyism and corruption. It also spurred demands that top officials disclose their wealth in editorials in two Chinese financial publications and from microbloggers. Bo’s family accumulated at least $136 million in assets, Bloomberg News reported in April.

Revolutionary Leader

Xi and his siblings are the children of the late Xi Zhongxun, a revolutionary fighter who helped Mao Zedong win control of China in 1949 with a pledge to end centuries of inequality and abuse of power for personal gain. That makes them “princelings,” scions of top officials and party figures whose lineages can help them wield influence in politics and business.

Most of the extended Xi family’s assets traced by Bloomberg were owned by Xi’s older sister,Qi Qiaoqiao, 63; her husband Deng Jiagui, 61; and Qi’s daughter Zhang Yannan, 33, according to public records compiled by Bloomberg.

Deng held an indirect 18 percent stake as recently as June 8 in Jiangxi Rare Earth & Rare Metals Tungsten Group Corp. Prices of the minerals used in wind turbines and U.S. smart bombs have surged as China tightened supply.

Yuanwei Group

Qi and Deng’s share of the assets of Shenzhen Yuanwei Investment Co., a real-estate and diversified holding company, totaled 1.83 billion yuan ($288 million), a December 2011 filing shows. Other companies in the Yuanwei group wholly owned by the couple have combined assets of at least 539.3 million yuan ($84.8 million).

A 3.17 million-yuan investment by Zhang in Beijing-based Hiconics Drive Technology Co. (300048) has increased 40-fold since 2009 to 128.4 million yuan ($20.2 million) as of yesterday’s close in Shenzhen.

Deng, reached on his mobile phone, said he was retired. When asked about his wife, Zhang and their businesses across the country, he said: “It’s not convenient for me to talk to you about this too much.” Attempts to reach Qi and Zhang directly or through their companies by phone and fax, as well as visits to addresses found on filings, were unsuccessful.

New Postcom

Another brother-in-law of Xi Jinping, Wu Long, ran a telecommunications company named New Postcom Equipment Co. The company was owned as of May 28 by relatives three times removed from Wu — the family of his younger brother’s wife, according to public documents and an interview with one of the company’s registered owners.

New Postcom won hundreds of millions of yuan in contracts from state-owned China Mobile Communications Corp., the world’s biggest phone company by number of users, according to analysts at BDA China Ltd., a Beijing-based consulting firm that advises technology companies.

Dozens of people contacted over the past two months wouldn’t comment about the Xi family on the record because of the sensitivity of the issue. Details from Web pages profiling one of Xi Jinping’s nieces and her British husband were deleted after the two people were contacted.

The total assets of companies owned by the Xi family gives the breadth of their businesses and isn’t an indication of profitability. Hong Kong property values were based on recent transactions involving comparable homes.

Identity Cards

Bloomberg’s accounting included only assets, property and shareholdings in which there was documentation of ownership by a family member and an amount could be clearly assigned. Assets were traced using public and business records, interviews with acquaintances and Hong Kong and Chinese identity-card numbers.

In cases where family members use different names in mainland China and in Hong Kong, Bloomberg verified identities by speaking to people who had met them and through multiple company documents that show the same names together and shared addresses.

Bloomberg provided a list showing the Xi family’s holdings to China’s Foreign Ministry. The government declined to comment.

In October 2000, Xi Zhongxun’s family gathered on his 87th birthday for a photograph at a state guest house in Shenzhen, two years before the patriarch’s death. The southern metropolis bordering Hong Kong is now one of China’s richest, thanks in part to the elder Xi. He persuaded former leader Deng Xiaoping to pioneer China’s experiment with open markets in what was a fishing village.

Family Photo

In the photo, Xi Zhongxun, dressed in a red sweater and holding a cane, is seated in an overstuffed armchair. To his left sits daughter Qi Qiaoqiao. On his right, a young grandson perches on doily-covered armrests next to the elder Xi’s wife, Qi Xin. Lined up behind are Qiaoqiao’s husband, Deng Jiagui; her brothers Xi Yuanping and presidential heir Xi Jinping; and sister Qi An’an alongside her husband Wu Long.

Xi Zhongxun worked to imbue his children with the revolutionary spirit, according to accounts in state media that portray him as a principled and moral leader. Family members have recounted in interviews how he dressed them in patched hand-me-downs.

He also made Qiaoqiao turn down her top-choice middle school in Beijing, which offered her a slot despite her falling half a point short of the required grade, according to a memorial book about him. Instead, she attended another school under her mother’s family name, Qi, so classmates wouldn’t know her background. Qiaoqiao and her sister An’an also sometimes use their father’s family name, Xi.

Party School

In a speech on March 1 this year before about 2,200 cadres at the central party school in Beijing where members are trained, Xi Jinping said that some were joining because they believed it was a ticket to wealth. “It is more difficult, yet more vital than ever to keep the party pure,” he said, according to a transcript of his speech in an official magazine.

His daughter, Xi Mingze, has avoided the spotlight. She studies at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, under an assumed name.

Xi’s elevation to replace Hu Jintao as China’s top leader isn’t yet formalized. He must be picked as the Communist Party’s general secretary in a meeting later this year and then be selected by the country’s legislature as president next March.

Deng Xiaoping

Disgruntlement over how members of the ruling elite translate political power into personal fortunes has existed since Deng Xiaoping’s economic reforms began three decades ago, when he said some people could get rich first and help others get wealthy later.

The relatives of other top officials have forged business careers. Premier Wen Jiabao’s son co-founded a private-equity company. The son of Wen’s predecessor, Zhu Rongji, heads a Chinese investment bank.

“What I’m really concerned about is the alliance between the rich and powerful,” said Wan Guanghua, principal economist at the Asian Development Bank. “It makes corruption and inequality self-reinforcing and persistent.”

Public criticism is mounting against ostentatious displays of wealth by officials. Microbloggers tracking designer labels sported by cadres expressed disgust last year at a gold Rolex watchworn by a former customs minister. They castigated the daughter of former Premier Li Peng for wearing a pink Emilio Pucci suit to the nation’s annual legislative meeting this March. Some complained that the 12,000 yuan they said it cost would pay for warm clothes for 200 poor children.

‘Unequal Access’

“People are angry because there’s unequal access to money- making, and the rewards that get reaped appear to the populace to be undeserved,” said Perry Link, a China scholar at the University of California, Riverside. “There’s no question in the Chinese public mind that this is wrong.”

Premier Wen told a meeting of China’s State Council on March 26 that power must be exercised “under the sun” to combat corruption.

While officials in China must report their income and assets to authorities, as well as personal information about their immediate family, the disclosures aren’t public.

The lack of transparency fuels a belief that the route to wealth depends on what Chinese call “guanxi,” a catch-all word for the connections considered crucial for doing business in the country. It helps explain why princelings with no official posts wield influence. Or, as a Chinese proverb puts it: When a man gets power, even his chickens and dogs rise to heaven.

‘Bigwig Relative’

“If you are a sibling of someone who is very important in China, automatically people will see you as a potential agent of influence and will treat you well in the hope of gaining guanxi with the bigwig relative,” said Roderick MacFarquhar, a professor of government at Harvard who focuses on Chinese elite politics.

The link between political power and wealth isn’t unique to China. Lyndon B. Johnson was so poor starting out in life that he borrowed $75 to enroll in Southwest Texas State Teachers College in 1927, according to his presidential library. After almost three decades of elective office, he and his family had media and real-estate holdings worth $14 million in 1964, his first full year as president, according to an August 1964 article in Life Magazine.

Orville Schell, director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society in New York, said the nexus of power and wealth can be found in any country. “But there is no country where this is more true than China,” he said. “There’s a huge passive advantage to just being in one of these family trees.”

Unfair to Xi

Yao Jianfu, a retired government researcher who has called for greater disclosure of assets by leaders, said it wouldn’t be right to tie Xi Jinping to the businesses of his family.

“If other members of the family are independent business representatives, I think it’s unfair to describe it as a family clan and count it as Xi Jinping’s,” Yao said in a telephone interview.

The lineage of Xi’s siblings hasn’t always been an advantage. Xi Zhongxun, the father, was purged by Mao in 1962. Like many other princelings, the children were scattered to the countryside during the Cultural Revolution. The 5-yuan payment Qiaoqiao received for working in a corps with 500 other youths in Inner Mongolia made her feel rich, she recalled in an interview on the website of Beijing-based Tsinghua University.

After Mao’s death in 1976, the family was rehabilitated and Xi’s sister Qiaoqiao pursued a career with the military and as a director with the People’s Armed Police. She resigned to care for her father, who had retired in 1990, Qiaoqiao said in the Tsinghua interview.

Property Purchase

A year later, she bought an apartment in what was then the British colony of Hong Kong for HK$3 million ($387,000) — at the time, equivalent to almost 900 times the average Chinese worker’s annual salary. She still owns the property, in the Pacific Palisades complex in Braemar Hill on Hong Kong island, land registry records show.

By 1997, Qi and Deng had recorded an investment of 15.3 million yuan in a company that later became Shenzhen Yuanwei Industries Co., a holding group, documents show. The assets of that company aren’t publicly available. However, one of its subsidiaries, Shenzhen Yuanwei Investment, had assets of 1.85 billion yuan ($291 million) at the end of 2010. It is 99 percent owned by the couple, according to a December 2011 filing by a securities firm.

It was after her father’s death in 2002 that Qi said she decided to go into business, according to the Tsinghua interview. She graduated from Tsinghua’s executive master’s degree in business administration program in 2006 and founded its folk-drumming team. It plays in the style of Shaanxi province, where Xi Zhongxun was born.

Paper Trail

The names Qi Qiaoqiao, Deng Jiagui or Zhang Yannan appear on the filings of at least 25 companies over the past two decades in China and Hong Kong, either as shareholders, directors or legal representatives — a term that denotes the person responsible for a company, such as its chairman.

In some filings, Qi used the name Chai Lin-hing. The alias was linked to her because of biographical details in a Chinese company document that match those in two published interviews with Qi Qiaoqiao. Chai Lin-hing has owned multiple companies and a property in Hong Kong with Deng Jiagui.

In 2005, Zhang Yannan started appearing on Hong Kong documents, when Qi and Deng transferred to her 99.98 percent of a property-holding company that owns one apartment, a unit in the Regent on the Park development with an estimated value of HK$54 million ($6.96 million).

Repulse Bay Villa

Land registry records show Zhang paid HK$150 million ($19 million) in 2009 for the villa on Belleview Drive in Repulse Bay, one of Hong Kong’s most exclusive neighborhoods. Property prices have since jumped about 60 percent in the area.

Her Hong Kong identity card number, written on one of the sale documents, matches that found on the company she owns with her mother and Deng Jiagui, Special Joy Investments Ltd. All three people share the same Hong Kong address in a May 12 filing.

Zhang owns four other luxury units in the Convention Plaza Apartments residential tower with panoramic harbor views adjoining the Grand Hyatt hotel.

Since its 1997 return by Britain to Chinese rule, Hong Kong has been governed autonomously, with its own legal and banking systems. About a third of all purchases of new luxury homes in the territory are by mainland Chinese buyers, according to Centaline Property Agency Ltd.

In mainland China, Qi and Deng’s marquee project is a luxury housing complex called Guanyuan near Beijing’s financial district, boasting manicured gardens and a gray-brick exterior reminiscent of the city’s historic courtyard homes. Financial details on the developer aren’t available because of restrictions on company searches in Beijing.

Beijing Complex

To finance the development, the couple borrowed from friends and banks, and aimed to attract officials and executives at state-owned companies, they told V Marketing China magazine in a 2006 interview. Property prices in the capital rose 79 percent in the following four years, government data show.

The site’s developer — 70 percent owned by Qi and Deng’s Yuanwei Investment — acquired more than 10,000 square meters of land for 95.6 million yuan in 2004 to build Guanyuan, according to the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Land and Resources.

A 189-square-meter (2,034-square-foot) three-bedroom apartment in Guanyuan listed online in June for 15 million yuan. One square meter sells for 79,365 yuan — more than double China’s annual per capita gross domestic product.

Public anger at soaring housing costs has made real estate an especially sensitive issue for leaders in China. Property prices were “far from a reasonable level,” Premier Wen said in March.

‘Playing Field’

The lack of a level playing field and unaffordable home prices mean “you can be cut out of the China dream,” said Joseph Fewsmith, director of the Center for the Study of Asia at Boston University, who focuses on Chinese politics. “Is the rise of China going to last if you build it around these sorts of unequal opportunities?”

Those with the right connections are able to gain access to assets that are controlled by the government, according to Bo Zhiyue, a senior research fellow at the National University of Singapore’s East Asian Institute.

“All they need is to get into the game one small step ahead of the others and they can make a huge gain,” he said. Bo wasn’t discussing the specific investments of Xi’s family members.

One of Deng’s well-timed acquisitions was in a state-owned company with investments in rare-earth metals.

Rare Earths

Deng’s Shanghai Wangchao Investment Co. bought a 30 percent stake in Jiangxi Rare Earth for 450 million yuan ($71 million) in 2008, according to a bond prospectus.

Deng owned 60 percent of Shanghai Wangchao. A copy of Deng’s Chinese identity card found in company registry documents matches one found in filings of a Yuanwei subsidiary. Yuanwei group-linked executives held the posts of vice chairman and chief financial officer in Jiangxi Rare Earth, the filings show.

The investment came as China, which has a near monopoly on production of the metals, was tightening control over production and exports, a policy that led to a more than fourfold surge in prices for some rare earths in 2011.

A woman who answered the phone at Jiangxi Rare Earth’s head office in Nanchang said she was unable to provide financial information because the company wasn’t listed on the stock exchange. She declined to discuss Shanghai Wangchao’s investment, saying it was too sensitive.

Hiconics Drive

Qi Qiaoqiao’s daughter Zhang made her 3.17 million-yuan investment in Hiconics in the three years before the Beijing- based manufacturer of electronic devices sold shares to the public in 2010. Hiconics founder Liu Jincheng was in the same executive MBA class as Qi Qiaoqiao, according to his profile on Tsinghua’s website.

Wang Dong, the company’s board secretary, didn’t respond to faxed questions or phone calls seeking comment.

The business interests of Qi and Deng may be more extensive still: The names appear as the legal representative of at least 11 companies in Beijing and Shenzhen, cities where restrictions on access to filings make it difficult to determine ownership of companies or asset values.

Dalian Wanda

For example, Deng was the legal representative of a Beijing-based company that bought a 0.8 percent stake in one of China’s biggest developers, Dalian Wanda Commercial Properties Co., for 30 million yuan in a 2009 private placement. Dalian Wanda Commercial had sales of 95.3 billion yuan ($15 billion) last year.

Dalian Wanda Commercial “doesn’t comment on private transactions,” it said in an e-mailed statement.

Deng also served as legal representative of a company that won a government contract to help build a 1 billion-yuan ($157 million) bridge in central China’s Hubei province, according to an official website and corporate records.

Complex ownership structures are common in China, according to Victor Shih, a professor at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, who studies the link between finance and politics in the country. Princelings engage people they trust, often members of their extended families, to open companies on their behalf that bid for contracts from state-owned enterprises, said Shih, who wasn’t referring specifically to Xi’s family.

New Postcom

In the case of Xi Jinping’s brother-in-law, Wu Long, he’s identified as chairman of New Postcom in two reports on the website of the Guangzhou Development District, one in 2009 and the other a year later.

New Postcom doesn’t provide a list of management on its website. Searches in Chinese on Baidu Inc.’s search engine using the name “Wu Long” and “New Postcom” trigger a warning, also in Chinese: “The search results may not be in accordance with relevant laws, regulations and policies, and cannot display.”

New Postcom is owned by two people named Geng Minhua and Hua Feng, filings show. Their address in the company documents leads to the ninth floor of a decades-old concrete tower in Beijing where Geng’s elderly mother lives. Tacked to the wall of her living room was the mobile-phone number of her daughter.

When contacted by phone June 6, Geng confirmed she owned New Postcom with her son Hua Feng — and that her daughter was married to Wu Ming, Wu Long’s younger brother. Geng said Wu Long headed the company and she wasn’t involved in the management.

Different Owners

New Postcom identified two different people — Hong Ying and Ma Wenbiao — as its owners in a six-page, June 27 statement and said the head of the company was a person named Liu Ran. The company didn’t respond to repeated requests to explain the discrepancies. Wu Long and his wife, Qi An’an, couldn’t be reached for comment.

New Postcom was an upstart company that benefited from state contracts. It specialized in the government-mandated home- grown 3G mobile-phone standard deployed by China Mobile. In 2007, it won a share of a tender to supply handsets, beating out more established competitors such as Motorola Inc., according to BDA China.

“They were an unknown that suddenly appeared,” said Duncan Clark, chairman of BDA. “People were expecting Motorola to get a big part of that device contract, and then a no-name company just appeared at the top of the list.”

In 2007, the domestic mobile standard was still being developed, and many of the bigger players were sitting on the sidelines, allowing New Postcom a bigger share of the market, the company said in the statement.

Xi Yuanping

William Moss, the Beijing-based spokesman of the Motorola Mobility unit that was split off from Motorola last year and purchased by Google Inc. (GOOG), declined to comment on details of any individual bids. China Mobile “has always insisted on the principle of open, fair, just and credible bidding” to select vendors, company spokesman Zhang Xuan said by e-mail.

Xi Jinping’s younger brother, Xi Yuanping, is the founding chairman of an energy advisory body called the International Energy Conservation Environmental Protection Association. He doesn’t play an active role in the organization, according to an employee who declined to be identified.

One of Xi’s nieces has a higher profile. Hiu Ng, the daughter of Qi An’an and Wu Long, and her husband Daniel Foa, 35, last year were listed as speakers at a networking symposium in the Maldives on sustainable tourism with the likes of the U.K. billionaire Richard Branson and the actress Daryl Hannah.

Hudson Clean Energy

Ng recently began working with Hudson Clean Energy Partners LP, which manages a fund of more than $1 billion in the U.S., to help identify investments in China.

Details about the couple were removed from Internet profiles after Bloomberg reporters contacted them. Foa said by phone he couldn’t comment about FairKlima Capital, a clean- energy fund they set up in 2007. Ng didn’t respond to e-mails asking for an interview.

The two are no longer mentioned on the FairKlima website. A June 3 cache of the “Contact Us” webpage includes short biographies of Ng and Foa under the headline “Senior Management Team.”

A reference on Ng’s LinkedIn profile that said on June 8 that she worked at New Postcom has since been removed, along with her designation as “Vice Chair Hudson Clean Energy Partners China.”

Neil Auerbach, the Teaneck, New Jersey-based private-equity firm’s founder, said he was working with Ng because of her longstanding passion for sustainability.

“We are aware of her political connections, but her focus is on sustainable investing, and that’s the purpose,” he said in a June 13 interview. “We’re delighted to be working with her.”

from:  http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-06-29/xi-jinping-millionaire-relations-reveal-fortunes-of-elite.html

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Xi Jinping was born on June 1st, 1953 (time of birth unknown) in Beijing, China according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xi_Jinping

[Mars/Mercury / Saturn/Neptune = Pluto]

 

June 1st, 1953

6 + 1 +1+9+5+3 = 25 = his life lesson = Activists.  Advocates.  Movements.  Restlessness.  The underdog.  On the go.

Knight of Wands Tarot card

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June 1st, 1953

June 1st

6 + 1 +2+0+1+2 = 12 = his personal year (from June 1st, 2012 to June 1st, 2013) = Phenomenon.  Unusual.  Reversals.  Wait and see.  When in doubt, do nothing.  Seeing is believing.

The Hanged Man Tarot card

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Xi Jinping

69 1957957              58

 

his path of destiny = 58 = Relax, I got this.  Give me a break.  Civil unrest.

Four of Swords Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology available at:

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undefined

http://electionnumerology.com/

Read Full Post »

2012-06-15             16:14:11

China’s first female astronaut, Liu Yang, is expected to improve the Shenzhou-9 mission crew’s working efficiency, a spokeswoman of China’s manned space program said Friday.

“Generally speaking, female astronauts have better durability, psychological stability and ability to deal with loneliness,” Wu Ping said at a press conference at Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center.

She added that a manned space program without the participation of women would be incomplete.

More than 50 female astronauts from seven countries have to date served in space missions. The longest space flight by a female astronaut lasted 188 days.

“The fact fully proves that female astronauts are completely competent for fulfilling space flight missions,” Wu said while briefing the press just ahead of the imminent Shenzhou-9 manned space mission to be launched on Saturday.

The Shenzhou-9 spacecraft will send Liu Yang, 33, and two male astronauts, Jing Haipeng and Liu Wang, into an orbit where they will manually dock Shenzhou-9 with awaiting Tiangong-1 space experimental module.

All countries that have completed manned space missions attached great significance to their respective first female astronaut’s maiden space flight, Wu said, citing the former Soviet Union’s first female astronaut Valentina Tereshkova and Sally Ride, the first American woman in space.

“The Chinese female astronaut’s participation in the manned space mission will accelerate research and development of female astronaut-related products, training and selection,” said Wu.

“It could also showcase Chinese women’s good image and further promote social influence of the country’s manned space program,” the spokeswoman said.

“As a female, I’m looking forward to the performance of China’s first female astronaut’s space flight,” she said.

from:  http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/china/2012-06/15/c_131655603.htm

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Liu Yang

393 7157               35

 

her path of destiny = 35 = Being prepared.  In it for the long haul.  Strength in adversity.

Nine of Wands Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

—————————————————————————————–

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Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

Either Captain Wang Yaping (l) or Major Liu Yang will join the Shenzhou-9 manned spacecraft docking mission.

 

Monday 11 June 2012               13.46 EDT

One of two female fighter pilots will become the first Chinese woman inspace later this month, after the two were shortlisted for a place in the three-person team that will blast off in the Shenzhou-9 spacecraft, the state news agency Xinhua said.

Chinese media described Major Liu Yang, from Henan, as a “hero pilot” who achieved a successful emergency landing after a dramatic birdstrike incident spattered the windshield of her plane with blood.

Meanwhile, her rival, Captain Wang Yaping, from Shandong, is said to have flown rescue missions during the Sichuan earthquake and piloted a cloud-seeding plane to help clear the skies of rain for the Beijing Olympics in 2008.

“They are selected as members of the first batch of female astronauts inChina because of their excellent flight skills and psychological quality,” said Xinhua.

This month’s mission is regarded as an important stage in China’s ambitious space programme. “The Shenzhou-9 will perform our country’s first manned space docking mission with the orbiting Tiangong-1 space lab module,” Zhou Jianping, chief designer of the manned space program, told state media.

“It means China’s spacecraft will become a genuine manned shuttle tool between space and Earth. It can send human beings to space stations or space labs. This will be a significant step in China’s manned space flight history.”

China will be the eighth country to see one of its female citizens go into space, and only the third to put one there itself. Valentina Tereshkova of the Soviet Union became the first woman to go into space in 1963.

Both the women shortlisted are in their 30s and have one child: Chinese authorities have decreed that only mothers can train as astronauts, apparently because of their concern that spaceflight might affect women’s fertility. Earlier this year, the deputy editor-in-chief of an official magazine said women astronauts should also have no scars – which might open and bleed in space – nor body odour.

“They even must not have decayed teeth because any small flaw might cause great trouble or a disaster in space,” said Pan Zhihao of Space International, published by the China Academy of Space Technology.

But he also told China Daily that female astronauts tend to be more “keen and sensitive with better communication skills than their male counterparts”.

from:  http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jun/11/china-first-woman-space?newsfeed=true

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Wang Yaping

5157 717957                   54

 

her path of destiny = 54 = Check it out.  Watch this.

Page of Swords Tarot card

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—————————————————————————————–

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

Chen china

May 4, 2012         6:39 am

The State Department said Friday that it expects China to quickly provide travel documents to blind human rights activist Chen Guangcheng, easing a weeklong crisis between Beijing and Washington over the fate of the long-imprisoned lawyer.

Victoria Nuland, the chief State Department spokeswoman, said in a statement that China has signaled that it will approve Chen’s application to travel to the United States with his family so that he can accept a temporary fellowship at a university and receive medical treatment.

“The Chinese government has indicated that it will accept Mr. Chen’s application for appropriate travel documents. The United States government expects that the Chinese government will expeditiously process his application for these documents, and make accommodations for his current medical condition,” Nuland said in the statement. She said the U.S. government would give “priority attention” to visa requests for Chen and his family.

Chen, held for months under house arrest in his rural hometown, set off an international diplomatic crisis last month by escaping and seeking refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. He appeared to accept a U.S.-negotiated deal to remain in China on Wednesday, repudiated it hours later, and then appeared to reverse himself again on Thursday.

He told a congressional panel in a phone call Thursday afternoon that he wanted to travel to the United States for only several months, and then return to China, a compromise that appears to have the blessing of Chinese officials. Yet activists and experts caution that it remains to be seen whether China will follow through on its promises to the United States to allow Chen freedom to pursue his studies and continue his political activism.

Nuland’s statement didn’t say which university Chen planned to work with. But Jerome Cohen, a law school professor at New York University, said Thursday that his school would offer Chen a role if he were able to make it to the United States.

The U.S. statement was another sign of the Obama administration’s eagerness to wrap up an impasse that has strained relations with China at a moment when both countries are coming through political transitions. Many Chinese officials have been upset by what they see as U.S. meddling, and Republicans and human rights advocates have criticized the administration for what they see as its heavy-handed diplomacy.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner wrapped up two days of high-level talks in Beijing on Friday. Though U.S. and Chinese officials made clear in the talks that they weren’t happy with the way the other country was handling the Chen affair, Clinton said afterward that officials had made progress in the economic and strategic discussions.

from:  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2012/05/chen-guangcheng-china-us-possible-breakthrough.html

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Chen Guangcheng was born on November 12th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Guangcheng

November 12th, 1971

November 12th

11 + 12 +2+0+1+1 = 27 = his personal year (from November 12th, 2011 to November 11th, 2012) = Uncharacteristic.  Out of character.

Ace of Wands Tarot card

27 year + 4 (April) = 31 = his personal month (from April 12th, 2012 to May 11th, 2012) = Controversy.  Struggle.

Five of Wands Tarot card

31 month + 4 (4th of the month on Friday May 4th, 2012) = 35 = his personal day = A real lifesaver.

Nine of Wands Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

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you can try to figure out some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

Read Full Post »

April 27, 2012         1255 GMT

A prominent Chinese human rights activist has called for an investigation into corrupt and cruel officials after he escaped from house arrest in an eastern province and fled to Beijing.

Chen Guangcheng addressed the Chinese premier, Wen Jiabao, in a video posted on YouTube on Friday, detailing the abuses he said he and his family had suffered at the hands of the authorities during more than 18 months of heavily guarded detention in their home.

“They broke into my house and more than a dozen men assaulted my wife,” he said. “They pinned her down and wrapped her in a comforter, beating and kicking her for hours. They also similarly violently assaulted me.”

Chinese authorities have not commented.

The activist, who is blind, was driven to Beijing on Sunday after evading his guards in the tiny village of Dongshigu in Shandong Province, said He Peirong, a friend and fellow activist said Friday.

His high-profile breakout appears to have angered the local authorities who were holding him captive, with members of his family already reporting that they have suffered reprisals.

Chen, 40, is a self-taught lawyer who rose to fame in the late 1990s thanks to his legal advocacy for what he called victims of abusive practices, such as alleged forced abortions, by China’s family-planning officials. He had been confined to his home along with his wife, mother and daughter since he was released from years in prison in September 2010.

In the video posted Friday, he said the treatment of him and his family by the local security forces “was so cruel it has greatly harmed the image of the Communist Party.”

Calling on Wen to investigate his case, he asked: “Is it just local officials flagrantly violating the law or do they have the support of the central government? I hope you will give the public a clear answer in the near future.”

The blind activist had prepared for his escape for months, He Peirong said, by lying in bed for prolonged periods so that the guards wouldn’t be suspicious if they didn’t see any activity from him for a long time.

Once free, Chen contacted He Peirong and a few other activists.

“We learned that he had escaped and needed our help,” she said, in an interview via Skype from her home city of Nanjing.

They met him at a rendezvous point, and then drove him to Beijing and hid him in a safe house, He Peirong said.

She said that Chen’s fellow activists had decided to publicize his flight from captivity after hearing that Shandong authorities, upon discovering his disappearance, had sent people to assault members of his family.

Chen Kegui, the blind activist’s nephew, said in a phone conversation with a Chinese activist that local officials broke into his family’s home. He said he used kitchen knives to defend himself when the officials tried to arrest him.

“I was afraid they might knock me down unconscious or beat me to death, so I went out to find somewhere safe,” the nephew said in the conversation, a recording of which was posted online. He added that he had since called the police and was waiting for them to come and pick him up.

Repeated attempts to reach Chen Kegui by phone were unsuccessful.

The blind activist expressed concern in the video Friday about his family’s welfare.

“Although I’m free, my worries are only deepening,” he said. “My wife, mother and children are still in their evil hands. They have been persecuting my family for a long time and my escape would only prompt them into a mode of revenge.”

Repeated calls seeking comment from the local authorities in Shandong rang unanswered.

The whereabouts of Chen’s wife, mother and daughter — who did not escape with him — remained unknown Friday.

Chen is relatively weak physically but his spirits are high, said He Peirong. There have been concerns about Chen’s health during his more than 18 months under house arrest, surrounded by a heavy police presence.

“He said he wants to live freely in his own country,” He Peirong said. “He said he hopes to hold my hand and take me to his village one day.”

The authorities reaction to Chen’s escape appeared to have ensnared He Peirong, too, after she spoke to CNN and other news media organizations Friday to publicize the situation.

Bob Fu, the head of the U.S.-based nonprofit group ChinaAid, said that he was communicating with He Peirong via Skype when she said that state security agents had arrived at her home. Attempts to contact her since then have been unsuccessful.

She had acknowledged that by speaking out about Chen’s escape, she was putting herself at risk.

“I’m not concerned about my own safety,” she said during the Skype interview. “I hope they’ll arrest me, not my friends.”

Chen’s period of home detention came after his time in jail. A local court had sentenced him to four years in prison for damaging property and disrupting traffic in a protest. His supporters maintain authorities used trumped-up charges to silence him.

Last year, in a video smuggled out of the country by a U.S.-based human rights group, Chen described his dire conditions of being a prisoner in his own home.

“Those people stand at the four corners of my house, spy on my family and monitor what we do,” he said. “They installed floodlights and surveillance cameras around my house.”

Sympathizers and journalists were prevented from visiting him, including the Hollywood actor Christian Bale, who was roughed up by security guards during an attempt to see Chen in December.

Chen’s incarceration and allegations of abuse by local officials have drawn international criticism from the likes of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Gary Locke, the U.S. ambassador to China.

Women’s Rights Without Frontiers, a U.S.-based nongovernmental organization that has been advocating Chen’s release, urged Clinton to raise the case when she visits Beijing next month.

“We are grateful that Chen is no longer under house arrest, but we are concerned about his safety and that of his family,” Reggie Littlejohn, the organization’s president, said in a statement.

“We call upon the entire international diplomatic community to make urgent, official interventions on behalf of Chen with the Chinese government,” Littlejohn said.

from:  http://edition.cnn.com/2012/04/27/world/asia/china-activist-escape/?hpt=hp_t2

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Chen Guangcheng was born on November 12th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Guangcheng

November 12th, 1971

11 + 12 +1+9+7+1 = 41 = his life lesson = Things get ugly.

Ace of Cups Tarot card

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November 12th, 1971

November 12th

11 + 12 +2+0+1+1 = 27 = his personal year (from November 12th, 2011 to November 11th, 2012) = Uncharacteristsic.  Acting out of character.

Ace of Wands Tarot card

27 year + 4 (April) = 31 = his personal month (from April 12th, 2012 to May 11th, 2012) = Controversy.  Things get out of hand.

Five of Wands Tarot card

31 month + 27 (27th of the month on Friday April 27th, 2012) = 58 = his personal day = Safe haven.  Safe house.

Four of Swords Tarot card

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Chen Guangcheng

3855 7315738557             72

 

his path of destiny = 72 =

“In command.  Holding tight.

Doing what he feels is right.”

Four of Pentacles Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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you can try to figure out some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology is available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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