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Archive for the ‘Pakistan’ Category

May 20, 2012

The Pakistani government blocked access to the social networking service Twitter on Sunday, after publicly holding Twitter responsible for promoting a blasphemous cartoon contest taking place on Facebook, officials said.

A government spokesman was quoted by local news media as saying that the government had been in talks with Twitter to remove “objectionable” material but that there had been no results.

“The material was promoting a competition on Facebook to post images of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad,” said Mohammad Yaseen, chairman of the Pakistan Telecommunication’s Authority, was quoted as saying. He was also quoted as saying that Facebook had agreed to allay the concerns of the Pakistani government.

Blasphemy is an issue that roils sentiment easily in Pakistan. Blasphemy allegations have often resulted in violent riots, and religious minorities in Pakistan have long maintained that the country’s blasphemy laws are used to settle personal scores.

Facebook was banned for two weeks in 2010 after protests erupted in the country over a similar cartoon contest on Facebook to draw the Prophet Muhammad. After a high court ordered the government to ban Facebook, the government was quick to ban YouTube and hundreds of other Web sites and services.

Speculation that the government intended to suspended Facebook and Twitter again had been swirling around for the past couple of days. However, this time around there have been no major public protests over the contest that Pakistani officials have expressed concerns about.

The ban has caught Twitter users by surprise.

“I never heard of any caricatures on Twitter,” said Arif Rafiq, an adjunct scholar at Middle East Institute and a commentator on Pakistani politics, who has a Twitter following of more than 10,000 users. “Now this ban will be promoting whatever caricatures were posted on it.”

Responding to a question last night, Rehman Malik, the country’s interior minister, had denied that ban on social networking sites was in the offing.

“The government of Pakistan’s ban on Twitter is ill advised, counterproductive and will ultimately prove to be futile as all such attempts at censorship have proved to be,” said Ali Dayan Hasan, Pakistan director at Human Rights Watch, in a press statement. “The right to free speech is nonnegotiable, and if Pakistan is the rights-respecting democracy it claims to be, this ban must be lifted forthwith. Free speech can and should only be countered with free speech.”

Critics said that the blocking of the micro-blogging site could actually be a part of longstanding government plan to muzzle media freedom and could be related to the vociferous opposition and criticism that is heaped on the country’s security apparatus in Twitter debates.

“Twitter is a place where fierce opposition to Pakistan’s security agencies is expressed,” said Raza Rumi, a widely read columnist and an adviser at the Jinnah Institute, a public policy center based in Islamabad.

“There is a clear trend,” Mr. Rumi said, “that the Pakistani military and spy agency get a strong critique from Pakistanis themselves, something that does not happen in mainstream media where people are generally shy to express such views.”

Activists supporting minority rights have established a strong voice on Twitter, and advocates for the Baluch people, who are demanding greater rights and a share of the natural-resources wealth in the southwestern province of Baluchistan, have also used it to spread their message.

from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/21/world/asia/pakistan-blocks-twitter-over-cartoon-contest.html

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Twitter was launched on July 15th, 2006 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twitter

July 15th, 2006

July 15th

7 + 15 +2+0+1+1 = 26 = Twitter’s personal year (from July 15th, 2011 to July 14th, 2012) = In the news.  Making headlines.

Page of Wands Tarot card

26 year + 5 (May) = 31 = Twitter’s personal month (from May 15th, 2012 to June 14th, 2012) = Controversy.  Things get out of hand.

Five of Wands Tarot card

31 month + 20 (20th of the month on Sunday May 20th, 2012) = 51 = Twitter’s personal day = Government officials.

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari is in Dubai for a medical checkup, his spokesman says.

8:47 AM EST        Wednesday December 7th, 2011

The Pakistani president’s trip to Dubai for a medical checkup is sparking talk Wednesday about whether the embattled president will resign.

The trip occurred Tuesday as speculation intensified over the so-called “Memogate” scandal, in which Pakistan’s civilian leaders were supposedly coming up with a plan to unseat the country’s military leadership.

Foreign Policy, the prominent American journal, published a story Tuesday noting that Zardari left the country “suddenly,” and it asked if he is “on the way out.” Twitter has buzzed with speculation as one message said “Zardari’s nice move to resign. A clear way for martial law.”

However, Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani said the president was getting treatment for a pre-existing heart condition and his spokesman knocked down speculation that he suffered a heart attack, an assertion that the spokesman, Farhatullah Babar, called “speculative, imaginary and untrue.”

He is having routine tests done related to his previously diagnosed cardiovascular condition, said Zardari’s spokeswoman, Farahnaz Ispahani.

Fareed’s Take: Pakistan

The ‘invisible man’ between Pakistan, US

The president went to Dubai “at the insistence” of his children, Gilani said.

“Routine evaluation of the President’s condition is being carried out. Investigations carried out so far are essentially within normal range and the president’s condition is stable,” according to a statement from Zardari’s physician.

Zardari will remain under observation, the prime minister said. The president took office in 2008 after his wife, former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, was assassinated.

Relations between Pakistan and the United States have deteriorated.

The United States has been incensed over apparent ties between anti-U.S. militants and the Pakistani military.

Pakistan has been enraged over the U.S. raid in Abbotabad that killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden and most recently, the ire across the country over the killing of two dozen Pakistani soldiers by NATO forces.

Amid heavy domestic pressure, Zardari’s government had to take tough decisions against the United States including stopping the transport of NATO supplies through Pakistan, asking the U.S. military to vacate the Shamsi air base and boycotting a Bonn Conference on the future of Afghanistan.

But the Memogate scandal has emboldened Zardari’s opponents, who think he favors closer ties with the U.S. military.

Husain Haqqani, the former Pakistani ambassador to the United States, is accused of writing a memo setting out the scheme.

The plot calls for taking power away from the country’s senior military and intelligence leaders, requesting U.S. assistance in stopping a military coup, asking for American backing of the Zardari government and vowing to make Pakistan’s foreign policy favorable to the United States.

Haqqani says he didn’t write the memo, which allegedly was passed along to American officials by Pakistani-American businessman Mansoor Ijaz just days after the bin Laden killing last spring.

Haqqani’s resignation was followed by new allegations by Ijaz that Zardari had prior knowledge of bin Laden’s presence in Abbotabad and the strike that killed him.

from:  http://www.cnn.com/2011/12/07/world/asia/pakistan-president-health/?hpt=hp_t2

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Asif Ali Zardari was born on July 26th, 1955 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asif_Ali_Zardari

July 26th, 1955

July 26th

7 + 26 +2+0+1+1 = 37 = his personal year (from July 26th, 2011 to July 25th, 2012) = Looking out for the best interests of his country.

37 year + 11 (November) = 48 = his personal month (from November 26th, 2011 to December 25th, 2011) = Walking away from it all.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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File photo of Hizb ut-Tahrir activists shouting anti-government slogans during a protest in Karachi on April 17.

June 22, 2011  0723 GMT

Brigadier General Ali Khan was close to retiring at the end of a distinguished career in the Pakistani Army when he was detained early in May — and accused of links with an outlawed Islamist group.

His arrest, which became public Tuesday, shocked fellow officers at army headquarters and again raises the specter that senior ranks of the Pakistani officer corps may be infiltrated by Islamist militants.

Brigadier Khan is the most senior officer to face such allegations since 1995, according to a CNN analysis of previous cases.

Army spokesman Major General Athar Abbas said Khan was believed linked to Hizb ut-Tahrir (Party of Liberation). He said efforts were underway to arrest members of the group who had been in contact with Khan.

“The military has zero tolerance for any such activity and strict disciplinary action will be taken against those involved,” said Major General Abbas.

Pakistani officials say Brigadier General Khan, who is 59, had an administrative role at army headquarters in Rawalpindi. His work did not involve counterterrorism and he did not command any unit. But he would have seen plenty of sensitive information.

Khan comes from a military family stretching back three generations, and has a son in the armed forces. Pakistani media report that one of his brothers is a colonel with the intelligence service.

Reuters news agency quoted Khan’s wife as dismissing the allegations as “rubbish,” saying her husband was “an intellectual, an honest, patriotic and ideological person.”

“It’s a fashion here that whosoever offers prayers and practices religion is dubbed as Taliban and militant,” Reuters quoted her as saying.

One of his brothers, Bashir Khan, told the Pakistani television network Aaj that the brigadier had been in the army for 25 years – serving with UN peacekeepers in Bosnia and spending time in the United States. In 2008, Khan received the highest honor available to soldiers of his rank.

Khan’s detention comes amid heightened concern about religious extremism within Pakistan’s armed forces.

Hizb ut-Tahrir says it is committed to non-violence but has urged soldiers to rebel against the military hierarchy and its goal it to establish a global Islamic Caliphate.

Pakistani sources tell CNN that in the aftermath of the raid that killed Osama bin Laden in Abbottabad, it produced pamphlets urging soldiers to turn against their commanders.

The group was outlawed by General Pervez Musharraf in 2004 but a Pakistani court subsequently overturned the ban. It is also active in the United Kingdom, Malaysia and Indonesia.

Simon Valentine, a British researcher who has studied extremism in the Pakistani armed forces, said that while Hizb ut-Tahrir doesn’t advocate violence “a cardinal element of its ideology and modus operandi is to infilitrate the armed forces and, once gaining sufficient support, cause a military coup.”

“Despite claims of zero tolerance of HuT within the Army,” he said, “militant Islam, including the HuT, has much support from the grass roots to the highest level within all branches of the armed forces.”

Valentine, who has researched Hizb ut-Tahrir in depth, said its views enjoy widespread support throughout Pakistani society.

“Such militancy as seen in the HuT is fuelled by an increasing anti-Americanism which is rife throughout Pakistan,” he told CNN.

Hassan Abbas, a scholar at Columbia University who has written extensively about Pakistani military intelligence, the ISI, told CNN he suspected there was more to the case than any alleged contacts with Hizb ul-Tahrir.

“Association with such a group would not be enough to hold him for six weeks,” especially as Khan was weeks away from retirement, he said.

Abbas, author of “Pakistan’s Drift into Extremism: Allah, the Army and America’s War on Terror,” said there is an alarming trend that includes Pakistani pilots refusing to bomb militant strongholds, and units surrendering to militant groups rather than fire on them.

Last month, Pakistani Taliban insurgents stormed the Naval Air Station in Karachi, apparently armed with inside information on its layout and security. They destroyed two U.S. supplied surveillance aircraft.

Days before he was abducted and murdered, Pakistani journalist Syed Shahzad described that attack as “the violent beginning of an internal ideological struggle between Islamist elements in the Pakistani armed forces and their secular and liberal top brass.”

He went on to quote unnamed sources in the ISI, Pakistan’s military intelligence service, as saying: “It was shown several months ago that the Pakistan navy is vulnerable to Islamists when a marine commando unit official was arrested…..Now, they (intelligence) realize how the organization (navy) is riddled and vulnerable to the influence of militant organizations.”

Last year two serving officers — including a colonel – and two former officers were indicted in a court martial for allegedly planning a terrorist attack on the Shamsi airbase.

Shamsi — in Balochistan province — is a remote base reportedly used by the United States drone program. The four were alleged to have been in contact with Hizb ut-Tahrir. They have pled not guilty.

And in 2004, several lower-ranking air force personnel were convicted in connection with assassination attempts against Pakistan’s leader at the time, General Pervez Musharraf.

One of them, Abdul Islam Siddiqui, was hanged but maintained he was innocent of involvement. Other soldiers said they had been tortured into implicating him.

Valentine, who is a regular visitor to Pakistan, said Khan’s arrest may be “part of an attempt to bolster the army’s reputation amid accusations that it is pro-militant,” in the wake of the raid by U.S. special forces that killed bin Laden.

But Hassan Abbas believes the military had no desire for the Khan case to become public. “The military is in deep crisis in the aftermath of Abbottabad,” he says. “They would have preferred to hush this up.”

from:  http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/06/22/pakistan.extremism/index.html

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

Ali Khan

1     2

his primary challenge = AK = 12 = Reversals.

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Nine year-old girl, Suhana, says she was kidnapped Sunday by two men with weapons and two women wearing burqas

June 21, 2011 7:52 a.m. EDT

A nine-year-old girl who says she was kidnapped by militants in Pakistan and told to be a suicide bomber was reunited with her parents Tuesday, police said.

The girl, Suhana, was kidnapped on Sunday by two men with weapons and two women wearing burqas, she told police. Police did not release her last name.

She was on her way to school when they seized her and drugged her, she said in a news conference broadcast by CNN affiliate GEO TV.

Suhana was driven to the Darra Islam checkpoint in Pakistan’s Lower Dir district and “told to detonate a suicide vest that the abductors had put on her,” district police officer Saleem Marwat told CNN.

“Instead of detonating the jacket, after getting out of the car, the child started shouting and running towards the paramilitary frontier corps soldiers stationed at the… post,” the officer said.

She was arrested, her explosive vest was taken off and she was placed in custody, he said.

The Pakistani Taliban have used children as suicide bombers before, but there have been few cases, if any, of children as young as nine.

Pakistani and U.S. officials alleged in 2009 that a top Taliban leader in Pakistan was buying and selling children for suicide bombings.

Pakistan’s military released a video showing children going through exercises in training for their attacks.

Taliban leader Baitullah Mehsud then sold the children to other Taliban officials for $6,000 to $12,000, Pakistani military officials said.

Meshud was killed in an apparent U.S. drone strike in August 2009.

As recently as April, a Pakistani teenager named Umar Fidai said teens were being trained in the country’s tribal region to stage attacks.

Fidai was arrested alive after the suicide bombing at a Sufi shine in April killed at least 41 people and wounded more than 100. The blast occurred in Dera Ghazi Khan in Punjab province.

Fidai said in TV interviews he got suicide bombing lessons for six months, including training to use pistols, grenades and a suicide jacket. He said an Afghan Taliban leader named Mullah Sangeen was in charge of the training camp.

from:  http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/06/21/pakistan.child.suicide.bomber/index.html

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Each letter of the first name rules 9 years of life.  Ages 9 to 18 are ruled by the second letter of the name.

Suhana

u is the 21st letter of the alphabet

So from ages nine to eighteen she has the number 21 going on.

21 = On the world stage.  For all the world to see.

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find out your own numerology at:

http://www.learnthenumbers.com/

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A group of youth hold a demonstration to condemn the killing of two brother by mob, Sunday, Aug. 22, 2010 in Sialkot, Pakistan. The Pakistani men took turns savagely beating the two teenage brothers with sticks, drawing blood before dragging and hanging their dead bodies from a nearby pole. None of the dozens of people watching tried to stop the attack, not even several police. The boys may have been mistaken for robbers.

Sun, Aug. 22, 2010 06:12 AM

The Pakistani men took turns savagely beating the two teenage brothers with sticks, drawing blood before dragging and hanging their dead bodies from a nearby pole. None of the dozens of people watching tried to stop the attack, not even several police. The boys may have been mistaken for robbers.

The scene, caught on video and broadcast on news channels, has outraged and anguished Pakistanis, some of whom are asking if years of state neglect have brutalized society. It also is a blow to the already-shoddy image of the government as it appeals for international aid to cope with disastrous floods.

“Is this what we are? Savages?” asked an editorial in The News, an English-language daily. “So utterly bereft of a speck of humanity that a crowd of ordinary men are passive spectators to public murder?”

The killings occurred Aug. 15 in Sialkot, a town in eastern Punjab province. As details have emerged, authorities appear increasingly confident the two boys – Moiz Butt, 17, and his brother Muneeb, 15 – were innocent.

The two went to play cricket after praying and eating breakfast, carrying a bag with them containing game equipment, said Mujahid Sherdil, a top government official in the district. They were sons of a middle-class man who deals in fabric for soccer balls. Moiz was honored with the title “hafiz” for having memorized the Muslim holy book, the Quran.

An armed robbery had taken place in the vicinity of the cricket field, so residents were on alert and police were nearby. Apparently, when the boys appeared with a bag, they were thought to be the robbers, Sherdil told The Associated Press.

He added, however, that more information was still being sought. The boys were believed to have been in fights over the past few days for the right to play on the cricket ground, which was about a mile (two kilometers) from their house.

The origins of the video are unknown and there are reports that multiple men in the crowd recorded the attack using cell phones. Stations blurred out some of the more graphic images of the boys’ bloodied bodies, but several faces in the crowd are clearly identifiable, including several police officers in uniform who watched.

Punjab province Police Chief Tariq Saleem said the government has ordered two separate inquiries into the killings.

“This incident is highly condemnable, especially in the police presence,” Saleem said after visiting the boys’ family. “All accused, including police, will be arrested soon.”

It’s unclear whether such mob killings are more common now than in years past in Pakistan, but they are more likely to get reported and affect the public consciousness because of the explosion of electronic media during the last decade.

Over the past two years, police and even soldiers have been caught on video beating suspects. In 2008, in two separate incidents in less than a week, crowds set fire to suspected robbers in the southern city of Karachi. In the first incident, a picture of men lying like logs in a fire made front pages.

Civic groups condemned the attack in Sialkot, and the media attention forced the government to respond. But many suspects never get caught – one reason mobs feel free to go after victims on their own.

Federal Interior Minister Rehman Malik visited the family of the two boys Sunday in Sialkot and issued an appeal for citizens to come forward with evidence to help the investigation. He said at least 10 suspects have been arrested, including four police officers.

Malik said the police should have at least fired their guns in the air to disperse the crowd, and added people should not take the law into their own hands.

“It is not the kind of incident any civilized society can afford,” he said. “The whole of Pakistan wants the people involved to be punished. And we are getting demands from the nation that they should be hanged at the very place where they murdered the two brothers.”

The brothers’ killings came as Pakistan’s government is reeling from other crises, including the worst flooding in decades. The calamity appears to have further eroded confidence in the government, a key U.S. ally in the fight against Islamist extremism.

In a column Sunday, commentator Ghazi Salahuddin wrote that the Sialkot attack and the desperation of the poor caught in the floods are “rooted in the potential inability of the state to protect and look after the citizens.”

“These things are possible because the successive ruling elites do not really love Pakistan,” Salahuddin wrote. “They have never loved this country and the present government does not deserve to be blamed more for its lapses than the previous ones.”

Read more: http://www.kansascity.com/2010/08/22/2166327/video-of-mob-killings-sparks-anguish.html#ixzz0xRS0Rrsf

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Monday, August 23, 2010, 14:05 IST

A video of a mob brutally lynching two teenage brothers in full public view in Pakistan’s Sialkot has not only shocked the world but has sparked off protests in the country and has prompted the Supreme Court to sit up and take note.

Pakistani news channels aired the bloody and horrifying video showing a lynch mob taking turns to savagely beat the two boys with sticks.

After beating them up, the mob dragged their dead bodies to a nearby pole to hang them there.

The incident took place last Sunday, Aug 15 when the boys, who were reportedly on their way to play cricket in Pak’s Punjab province, were mistaken to be robbers by people, who decided to indulge in mob justice.

The video shows a gathering of large crowds as the mobs mercilessly beat the boys to death. What is more shocking is the fact that policemen were part of the mute bystanders, who watched the mob kill the teenage boys.

Authorities have confirmed that the two boys identified as Moiz Butt (17) and his brother Muneeb (15) were innocent.

Raising serious questions over the incident, several civic groups and youths held demonstrations to condemn the killings.

Now, the Supreme Court has sought action against the killers. Supreme Court Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry, who took suo moto notice of the incident after the footage was broadcast on TV news channels, observed that the killing reflected the “growing intolerance” in Pakistani society.

from:  http://news.oneindia.in/2010/08/23/pak-mob-kills-innocent-boys-video-sparks-outrage.html

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

  

Moiz Butt

4698 2322      36

his path of destiny/how he learned what he was here to learn = 36 = Crushed.  Crushing.  People abusing their power.

 

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

Moiz Butt

4      2 22

 

his primary challenge (MB), what he must/mustn’t do (MT), and how he obtained/lost his heart’s desire (MT) all = 42 = Relationships.  Misunderstandings.

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using the number/letter grid:

1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R 
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z
 

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

Muneeb Butt

4           2 22

 

his primary challenge (MB), what he must/mustn’t do (MT), and how he obtained/lost his heart’s desire (MT) all = 42 = Relationships.  Misunderstandings.

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