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              FILE - In this July 18, 2012 file photo, a white bison calf walks in a field at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen, Conn. Hundreds of Native Americans attended ceremonies at the farm Saturday, July 28, 2012, to name the rare white bison, revered as a symbol of peace and unity. The miracle calf was officially named Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, Flie)

July 28, 2012

Dozens of Native Americans wore the traditional garb of their ancestors, sang songs and beat drums on a western Connecticut farm Saturday in celebration of the birth of one of the world’s rarest animals — a white bison.

The miracle calf was officially named Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy at the elaborate ceremony at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen in the state’s northwestern hills. It was born June 16 at the farm of fourth-generation farmer Peter Fay.

Many Native Americans consider white bison a symbol of hope and unity; some consider their births sacred events. Experts say white bison are as rare as one in 10 million.

Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy is not an albino. Fay said he is certain the bloodlines are pure, although he has sent its DNA for testing to confirm there was no intermingling with cattle.

Lakota tribe members from South Dakota were among the hundreds of people who gathered at the celebration. Other tribal elders from the Mohawk, Seneca and Cayuga tribes participated.

Crowds patiently waited by the roadside before slowly marching into the pasture and lining up alongside a fence as the ceremony began. Children squeezed up against their parents and peered through the fence.

Some women were dressed in colorful tunics and other items indigenous to Native American culture, including bracelets, feathers and boots. Men also wore traditional costumes. Those leading the ceremony wore plain and small headdresses.

Fay, 53, runs the farm below Mohawk Mountain and invited Native Americans to the event, which also included a feast and talks by tribe elders.

‘‘I’m almost like the calf to them because I’m the caregiver. They’ve been here almost every day, teaching me,’’ said Fay, who has a herd of bison tattooed on his right shoulder.

Fay attended a sweat lodge ceremony with the elders on Friday night in Cornwall. The nearly two-hour ceremony was a way to repair damage done to their spirits, minds and bodies. It acted as a prayer for a name for the calf to come to them through the spirits.

Saturday’s ceremony was held under an arbor next to a large fire, amid thunder and large dark rain clouds. Marian and Chubb White Mouse, members of the Oglala Lakota tribe in South Dakota, traveled to Goshen from Wanblee, S.D., to lead the ceremony.

Marian White Mouse told the crowd the birth of a white bison is a sign from a prophet, the White Buffalo Calf Woman, who helped them endure times of strife and famine.

‘‘We come with one prayer, one heart and one mind,’’ she said tearfully. ‘‘This is truly a miracle. I hope that this one prayer will keep my people together, keep all of us together.’’

Barbara Threecrow, an elder from the Naticoke tribe who lives in Hudson Valley, N.Y., sat holding a sacred Canupa of beaver skin containing a pipe.

‘‘I believe this is an awakening,’’ Threecrow said. ‘‘This is a way of telling people to remember the sacredness of all of life.’’

from:  http://www.boston.com/business/news/2012/07/28/hundreds-celebrate-rare-white-bison-conn-farm/Q5isJjowc7feMJZbRQTDSO/story.html

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Saturday June 16th, 2012

June 16th, 2012

6 + 16 +2+0+1+2 = 27 = Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy’s life lesson = Usher in.

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

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—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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http://summerolympicsnumerology.com/

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July 3, 2012

State flags will fly at half-staff Tuesday across North Carolina, in tribute to the Charlotte-based Air National Guard members who were killed in the crash of their C-130 cargo plane Sunday night in a firefighting mission in South Dakota’s Black Hills.

At least two crew members were killed, according to family members, but several published and broadcast reports Tuesday said the death toll was four.

The plane carried a crew of six.

The Air Force is expected to provide more details on the crash and the casualty toll during a news conference Tuesday.

Lt. Col. Paul Mikeal of Mooresville and Master Sgt. Robert Cannon of Charlotte were among those who died, according to family members.

Josh Marlowe of Shelby was seriously injured in the crash and in a South Dakota hospital, his mother-in-law told the Observer.

The C-130 plane, from the N.C. Air National Guard’s 145th Air Wing, was pressed into service due to wildfires that have burned thousands of acres and destroyed hundreds of homes in Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota.

Air Force officials said the cause of the crash remains under investigation.

But a blogger at the website Wildfire Today cited information from the U.S. Forest Service indicating a plane ahead of the C-130 experienced a “severe downdraft” while approaching the area where the planes had been assigned to drop fire retardant.

The Air Force grounded seven other firefighting C-130s in the wake of the crash Monday, removing critical equipment from the skies during one of the busiest and most destructive wildfire seasons ever in the West.

The plane that went down, a C-130H3, was manufactured in 1993, according to First Lt. Michael Wilber, a spokesman for the N.C. National Guard.

The maintenance crew found no mechanical deficiencies on the plane the last time it was on the ground, Wilber said. It was one of three planes sent from Charlotte.

All six on the flight were experienced crewmen who had drilled in fire missions, according to Lt. Col. Robert Carter of the N.C. Air National Guard.

The Charlotte-based Air National Guard crews were helping the Colorado, Wyoming and California National Guard units battle the Waldo Canyon and Flagstaff fires in Colorado; the Arapaho fire in Wyoming; and the White Draw blaze in South Dakota.

The C-130 planes were carrying the Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System (MAFFS), a self-contained firefighting system owned by the Forest Service. MAFFS can discharge 3,000 gallons of water or fire retardant in a matter of seconds.

Those planes, which made multiple flights in recent days, typically aren’t deployed unless the rest of the Forest Service’s firefighting fleet is occupied.

President Barack Obama said the firefighting crews “put their lives on the line every day for their fellow Americans.”

“They are heroes who deserve the appreciation of a grateful nation,” Obama said. “The crew of this flight — along with their families and loved ones — are in our thoughts and prayers.”

Gov. Bev Perdue said in a statement that the “tragic loss underscores the risks and sacrifices our servicemen and women make on a daily basis. Whether home or aboard, they leave their families to keep us safe and protect our freedom.”

Perdue encouraged North Carolina residents to join state officials in flying flags at half-staff.

U.S. Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., who represents Mikeal’s district in Congress, said, “Mikeal and his crew fought through dangerous conditions, trying to save the homes and lives of thousands of Americans. His courage and heroism will not be forgotten.”

About 1,400 men and women are based with the Charlotte National Guard unit. Most of them are from the Carolinas. The 145th Air Wing has ten C-130 aircraft.

The two firefighting planes from the Charlotte unit, along with a third craft used for equipment and supplies, flew to the Colorado base Saturday.

A spokesman for the 145th Airlift Wing said its aircraft were scheduled to move Monday to a base in Wyoming, so they could be closer to the fire.

from:  http://www.firehouse.com/news/10736614/four-believed-dead-in-sd-firefighting-plane-crash

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Joe McCormick

65        6    9         26

 

his soul number = 26 = Popular.  Newsworthy.

Page of Wands Tarot card

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undefined

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

Read Full Post »

July 3, 2012

State flags will fly at half-staff Tuesday across North Carolina, in tribute to the Charlotte-based Air National Guard members who were killed in the crash of their C-130 cargo plane Sunday night in a firefighting mission in South Dakota’s Black Hills.

At least two crew members were killed, according to family members, but several published and broadcast reports Tuesday said the death toll was four.

The plane carried a crew of six.

The Air Force is expected to provide more details on the crash and the casualty toll during a news conference Tuesday.

Lt. Col. Paul Mikeal of Mooresville and Master Sgt. Robert Cannon of Charlotte were among those who died, according to family members.

Josh Marlowe of Shelby was seriously injured in the crash and in a South Dakota hospital, his mother-in-law told the Observer.

The C-130 plane, from the N.C. Air National Guard’s 145th Air Wing, was pressed into service due to wildfires that have burned thousands of acres and destroyed hundreds of homes in Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota.

Air Force officials said the cause of the crash remains under investigation.

But a blogger at the website Wildfire Today cited information from the U.S. Forest Service indicating a plane ahead of the C-130 experienced a “severe downdraft” while approaching the area where the planes had been assigned to drop fire retardant.

The Air Force grounded seven other firefighting C-130s in the wake of the crash Monday, removing critical equipment from the skies during one of the busiest and most destructive wildfire seasons ever in the West.

The plane that went down, a C-130H3, was manufactured in 1993, according to First Lt. Michael Wilber, a spokesman for the N.C. National Guard.

The maintenance crew found no mechanical deficiencies on the plane the last time it was on the ground, Wilber said. It was one of three planes sent from Charlotte.

All six on the flight were experienced crewmen who had drilled in fire missions, according to Lt. Col. Robert Carter of the N.C. Air National Guard.

The Charlotte-based Air National Guard crews were helping the Colorado, Wyoming and California National Guard units battle the Waldo Canyon and Flagstaff fires in Colorado; the Arapaho fire in Wyoming; and the White Draw blaze in South Dakota.

The C-130 planes were carrying the Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System (MAFFS), a self-contained firefighting system owned by the Forest Service. MAFFS can discharge 3,000 gallons of water or fire retardant in a matter of seconds.

Those planes, which made multiple flights in recent days, typically aren’t deployed unless the rest of the Forest Service’s firefighting fleet is occupied.

President Barack Obama said the firefighting crews “put their lives on the line every day for their fellow Americans.”

“They are heroes who deserve the appreciation of a grateful nation,” Obama said. “The crew of this flight — along with their families and loved ones — are in our thoughts and prayers.”

Gov. Bev Perdue said in a statement that the “tragic loss underscores the risks and sacrifices our servicemen and women make on a daily basis. Whether home or aboard, they leave their families to keep us safe and protect our freedom.”

Perdue encouraged North Carolina residents to join state officials in flying flags at half-staff.

U.S. Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., who represents Mikeal’s district in Congress, said, “Mikeal and his crew fought through dangerous conditions, trying to save the homes and lives of thousands of Americans. His courage and heroism will not be forgotten.”

About 1,400 men and women are based with the Charlotte National Guard unit. Most of them are from the Carolinas. The 145th Air Wing has ten C-130 aircraft.

 

The two firefighting planes from the Charlotte unit, along with a third craft used for equipment and supplies, flew to the Colorado base Saturday.

A spokesman for the 145th Airlift Wing said its aircraft were scheduled to move Monday to a base in Wyoming, so they could be closer to the fire.

from:  http://www.firehouse.com/news/10736614/four-believed-dead-in-sd-firefighting-plane-crash

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Robert Cannon

9          3

 

his primary challenge = RC = 93 = Making the best of a worst-case scenario.

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undefined

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

Read Full Post »

undefined

July 2, 2012

The Air Force says some crewmembers died in the crash of a C-130 aircraft while battling a wildfire in southwestern South Dakota on Sunday night.

Three of the six crewmembers were hospitalized, the Rapid City Journal reports. No specifics yet as to the exact number of dead and injured. The family of a lieutenant colonel from North Carolina confirmed that he died in the crash.

The plane was attached to the 145th Airlift Wing in Charlotte.

ON Monday afternoon, the Pentagon temporarily grounded the aircraft from firefighting duties.

Update at 8:45 p.m. ETThe Charlotte Observer  has background on 42-year-old Lt. Col. Paul Mikeal of Mooresville, N.C., who died in the crash. He flew C-130s in Iraq and Afghanistan, but the Air Force has not yet said whether he was piloting the plane that crashed Sunday while fighting the White Draw Fire.

Mikeal was anticipating returning home later this week to celebrate his 20th wedding anniversary with his wife and their 15-year-old daughter and 12-year-old son. His mother-in-law described him as “a real family man.”

In an interview Saturday with Examiner.com, Mikeal mentioned the dangers of fighting the devastating wildfires in Colorado.

The Observer also reports that a second local Air Guardsman was killed and another was injured Sunday night.

Update at 8:10 p.m. ET: The blog Wildfire Today is reporting that the U.S. Forest Service says four crewmembers died and two were injured. Still no confirmation.

What caused the plane to crash is still unknown, but Wildfire Today noted a Forest Service report that the lead Bureau of Land Management plane, flying directly ahead of the C-130 Hercules, “experienced a severe downdraft while approaching the intended retardant drop zone” in the Black Hills about 5 miles northeast of Edgemont.

Update at 4:53 p.m. ET: President Obama has issued a statement of condolences, our colleagues at The Oval report.

BLOG:  Obama offers condolences on military plane crash

Update at 4:23 p.m. ET: Military C-130s activated to help fight fires in the West will not fly today, the Pentagon says.

The aircraft have been placed on “operational hold” so crews can “reflect, reset and review,” said Col. Jerry Champlin, commander of the 153rd Air Expeditionary group, The Argus Leader reports.

Seven planes have been grounded, the paper says.

Although the military has not yet announced how many crewmembers died, the family of Lt. Col. Paul Mikeal of Mooresville, N.C., confirmed to the Associated Press they were notified early today that he had died in crash. [Correction: Initial post stated it was confirmed to The Argus Leader.]

The fatality is the first in the 40-year history of a joint program between the Forest Service and the Department of Defense to fight wildfires.

Update at 3:13 p.m. ET: The Air Force now confirms there were fatalities but has not said how many, according to The Argus Leader of Sioux Falls, published by USA TODAY’s parent company, Gannett.

“There were casualties, and our thoughts and prayers go out to those who were injured and those who lost their lives,” the Air Force said in a release. “The family members of these Airmen are especially on our minds. We will provide further details on the status of the casualties soon.”

Original post by Douglas Stanglin:

Update at 1:54 p.m. ET: The North Carolina Air National Guard says six crewmembers were aboard, the Associated Press reports. The C-130 is part of the 145th Airlift Wing in Charlotte.

Military officials say the plane crashed after dropping fire retardant Sunday in the Black Hills.

Original post: The Journal reports that a helicopter transported the injured to a hospital in Rapid City.

The C-130, which normally carries a crew of six, was supporting efforts against the White Draw Fire when it went down, according to the Air Force’s United States Northern Command.

The Associated Press reports that the C-130 Hercules plane was from a Charlotte-based Air National Guard unit.

It was equipped with a modular airborne firefighting system, which can discharge 3,000 gallons of water or fire retardant in less than five seconds, covering an area one-quarter of a mile long by 100 feet wide, according to the Air Force.

The White Draw Fire — one of dozens that crews are battling in the West — had grown to 3,000 acres by Sunday night and was only 10% contained.

from:  http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2012/07/c-130-crashes-while-fighting-south-dakota-wildfire/1

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Paul Mikeal

7                3  

 

how he lost his heart’s desire = PL = 73 = Material hardship.

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

This May 2011 photo provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections via The Oklahoman shows convicted killer Roger Berget who was executed on June 8, 2000. His younger brother Rodney Berget is in prison in South Dakota awaiting execution for bludgeoning a prison guard to death with a pipe during an attempted escape. The Bergets are not the first pair of siblings to be condemned. (AP Photo/Oklahoma Department of Corrections via The Oklahoman)

05/27/12              03:20 PM ET

Rodney Berget lives in a single cell on South Dakota’s death row, rarely leaving the tiny room where he awaits execution for bludgeoning a prison guard to death with a pipe during an attempted escape.

For Berget’s immediate family, his fate is somewhat familiar. He is the second member of the clan to be sentenced to death. His older brother was convicted in 1987 of killing a man for his car. Roger Berget spent 13 years on Oklahoma’s death row until his execution in 2000 at age 39.

The Bergets are not the first pair of siblings to be condemned. Record books reveal at least three cases of brothers who conspired to commit crimes and both got the death penalty. But these two stand out because their crimes were separated by more than 600 miles and 25 years.

“To have it in different states in different crimes is some sort of commentary on the family there,” said Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, which tracks death penalty trends.

The siblings’ journey from the poverty of their South Dakota childhood to stormy, crime-ridden adult lives shows the far-reaching effects of a damaged upbringing – and the years of havoc wrought by two men who developed what the courts called a wanton disregard for human life.

Rodney Berget is scheduled to die later this year, potentially ending the odyssey that began when the two boys were born into a family that already had four kids.

A former prison principal described Rodney as a “throwaway kid” who never had a chance at a productive life. A lawyer for Roger recalled him as an “ugly duckling” with little family support.

The boys were born after the family moved from their failed farm in rural South Dakota to Aberdeen, a city about 20 miles away. Roger arrived in 1960. Rodney came along two years later.

His farming dreams dashed, patriarch Benford Berget went to work for the state highway department. Rosemary Berget took a night job as a bar manager at the local Holiday Inn.

The loss of the farm and the new city life seemed to strain the family and the couple’s marriage. When the family moved to town, “things kind of fell apart,” Bonnie Engelhart, the eldest Berget sibling, testified in 1987.

Benford Berget, away on business, was rarely around. When he was home, he drank and become physically abusive, lawyers for the brothers later said.

By the 1970s, the couple divorced, and Roger and Rodney started getting into trouble. Roger skipped school. Rodney started stealing. Soon, they were taking cars. Both went to prison for the first time as teens.

Roger Berget enjoyed a rare period of freedom in 1982 and met a woman while hitchhiking. The two started a relationship, and the woman gave birth to a child the next year. But Roger didn’t get to see his son often because he was soon behind bars again, this time in Oklahoma. And for a far more sinister crime.

Roger and a friend named Michael Smith had decided to steal a random car from outside an Oklahoma City grocery store. The two men spotted 33-year-old Rick Patterson leaving the store on an October night in 1985. After abducting him at gunpoint, they put Patterson in the trunk and concluded he would have to be killed to prevent him from identifying his captors.

They drove the car to a deserted spot outside the city and shot Patterson in the back of the head and neck, blowing away the lower half of his face.

A year later, Berget pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and was sentenced to death on March 12, 1987. An appeals court threw out a death sentence for Smith, who was later sentenced to life in prison without parole.

Less than three months after Roger was sentenced to death, Rodney Berget, then 25 and serving time for grand theft and escape, joined five other inmates in breaking out of the South Dakota State Penitentiary in Sioux Falls.

The men greased their bodies with lotion, slipped through a hole in an air vent and then cut through window bars in an auto body shop at the prison. Berget was a fugitive for more than a month.

Thirteen years passed before Roger Berget was executed by lethal injection on June 8, 2000. His younger brother was still in prison in South Dakota.

Then in 2002, the younger Berget was released. His sister and her husband threw Rodney his first-ever birthday party when he turned 40.

But the good days were numbered because a year later, he was sentenced to life in prison for attempted murder and kidnapping. He headed back to the South Dakota State Penitentiary – this time for good.

Then Rodney got to talking with a fellow inmate named Eric Robert about a goal they shared: to escape – or die trying.

The plan was months in the making. The inmates figured they would corner a solitary guard – any guard would do – and beat him with a pipe before covering his face with plastic wrap.

Once the guard was dead, Robert would put on the dead man’s uniform and push a box with Berget inside as the prison gates opened for a daily delivery. The two would slip through the walls unnoticed.

On the morning of April 12, 2011, the timing seemed perfect. Ronald “R.J.” Johnson was alone in a part of the prison where inmates work on upholstery, signs, custom furniture and other projects. Johnson wasn’t supposed to be working that day – it was his 63rd birthday. But he agreed to come in because of a scheduling change.

After attacking Johnson, Robert and Berget made it outside one gate. But they were stopped by another guard before they could complete their escape through the second gate. Both pleaded guilty.

In a statement to a judge, Rodney acknowledged he deserved to die.

“I knew what I was doing, and I continued to do it,” Berget said. “I destroyed a family. I took away a father, a husband, a grandpa.”

His execution, scheduled for September, is likely to be delayed to allow the State Supreme Court time to conduct a mandatory review.

Rodney Berget’s lawyer, Jeff Larson, has declined to comment on the case outside of court. Rodney did not respond to letters sent to the penitentiary.

The few members of the Berget family who survive are reluctant to talk about how seemingly normal boys turned into petty criminals and then into convicted killers of the rarest kind: brothers sentenced to death.

Dieter, of the Death Penalty Information Center, said some families of the condemned remain involved in appeals. But others see no reason to preserve connections.

“There’s no light at the end of it,” he said. “What happens at the end is execution.”

from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/27/rodney-berget-roger-berget-death-row_n_1549277.html

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Roger Berget

9         2        2

 

his primary challenge (RB) and how he lost his heart’s desire (RT) both = 92 = Prosecution.

 

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undefined

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

undefined

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

undefined

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

FILE - This April 13, 2011 file photo shows Rodney Berget, now awaiting execution for bludgeoning a prison guard to death with a pipe during an attempted escape, in Sioux Falls, S.D. For Berget's immediate family, his fate is somewhat familiar. He is the second member of the clan to be sentenced to death. His older brother, Roger Berget, spent 13 years on Oklahoma's death row until his execution in 2000 at age 39. (AP Photo/The Argus Leader, Elisha Page, File) NO SALES

Rodney Berget lives in a single cell on South Dakota’s death row, rarely leaving the tiny room where he awaits execution for bludgeoning a prison guard to death with a pipe during an attempted escape.

For Berget’s immediate family, his fate is somewhat familiar. He is the second member of the clan to be sentenced to death. His older brother was convicted in 1987 of killing a man for his car. Roger Berget spent 13 years on Oklahoma’s death row until his execution in 2000 at age 39.

The Bergets are not the first pair of siblings to be condemned. Record books reveal at least three cases of brothers who conspired to commit crimes and both got the death penalty. But these two stand out because their crimes were separated by more than 600 miles and 25 years.

“To have it in different states in different crimes is some sort of commentary on the family there,” said Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, which tracks death penalty trends.

The siblings’ journey from the poverty of their South Dakota childhood to stormy, crime-ridden adult lives shows the far-reaching effects of a damaged upbringing – and the years of havoc wrought by two men who developed what the courts called a wanton disregard for human life.

Rodney Berget is scheduled to die later this year, potentially ending the odyssey that began when the two boys were born into a family that already had four kids.

A former prison principal described Rodney as a “throwaway kid” who never had a chance at a productive life. A lawyer for Roger recalled him as an “ugly duckling” with little family support.

The boys were born after the family moved from their failed farm in rural South Dakota to Aberdeen, a city about 20 miles away. Roger arrived in 1960. Rodney came along two years later.

His farming dreams dashed, patriarch Benford Berget went to work for the state highway department. Rosemary Berget took a night job as a bar manager at the local Holiday Inn.

The loss of the farm and the new city life seemed to strain the family and the couple’s marriage. When the family moved to town, “things kind of fell apart,” Bonnie Engelhart, the eldest Berget sibling, testified in 1987.

Benford Berget, away on business, was rarely around. When he was home, he drank and become physically abusive, lawyers for the brothers later said.

By the 1970s, the couple divorced, and Roger and Rodney started getting into trouble. Roger skipped school. Rodney started stealing. Soon, they were taking cars. Both went to prison for the first time as teens.

Roger Berget enjoyed a rare period of freedom in 1982 and met a woman while hitchhiking. The two started a relationship, and the woman gave birth to a child the next year. But Roger didn’t get to see his son often because he was soon behind bars again, this time in Oklahoma. And for a far more sinister crime.

Roger and a friend named Michael Smith had decided to steal a random car from outside an Oklahoma City grocery store. The two men spotted 33-year-old Rick Patterson leaving the store on an October night in 1985. After abducting him at gunpoint, they put Patterson in the trunk and concluded he would have to be killed to prevent him from identifying his captors.

They drove the car to a deserted spot outside the city and shot Patterson in the back of the head and neck, blowing away the lower half of his face.

A year later, Berget pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and was sentenced to death on March 12, 1987. An appeals court threw out a death sentence for Smith, who was later sentenced to life in prison without parole.

Less than three months after Roger was sentenced to death, Rodney Berget, then 25 and serving time for grand theft and escape, joined five other inmates in breaking out of the South Dakota State Penitentiary in Sioux Falls.

The men greased their bodies with lotion, slipped through a hole in an air vent and then cut through window bars in an auto body shop at the prison. Berget was a fugitive for more than a month.

Thirteen years passed before Roger Berget was executed by lethal injection on June 8, 2000. His younger brother was still in prison in South Dakota.

Then in 2002, the younger Berget was released. His sister and her husband threw Rodney his first-ever birthday party when he turned 40.

But the good days were numbered because a year later, he was sentenced to life in prison for attempted murder and kidnapping. He headed back to the South Dakota State Penitentiary – this time for good.

Then Rodney got to talking with a fellow inmate named Eric Robert about a goal they shared: to escape – or die trying.

The plan was months in the making. The inmates figured they would corner a solitary guard – any guard would do – and beat him with a pipe before covering his face with plastic wrap.

Once the guard was dead, Robert would put on the dead man’s uniform and push a box with Berget inside as the prison gates opened for a daily delivery. The two would slip through the walls unnoticed.

On the morning of April 12, 2011, the timing seemed perfect. Ronald “R.J.” Johnson was alone in a part of the prison where inmates work on upholstery, signs, custom furniture and other projects. Johnson wasn’t supposed to be working that day – it was his 63rd birthday. But he agreed to come in because of a scheduling change.

After attacking Johnson, Robert and Berget made it outside one gate. But they were stopped by another guard before they could complete their escape through the second gate. Both pleaded guilty.

In a statement to a judge, Rodney acknowledged he deserved to die.

“I knew what I was doing, and I continued to do it,” Berget said. “I destroyed a family. I took away a father, a husband, a grandpa.”

His execution, scheduled for September, is likely to be delayed to allow the State Supreme Court time to conduct a mandatory review.

Rodney Berget’s lawyer, Jeff Larson, has declined to comment on the case outside of court. Rodney did not respond to letters sent to the penitentiary.

The few members of the Berget family who survive are reluctant to talk about how seemingly normal boys turned into petty criminals and then into convicted killers of the rarest kind: brothers sentenced to death.

Dieter, of the Death Penalty Information Center, said some families of the condemned remain involved in appeals. But others see no reason to preserve connections.

“There’s no light at the end of it,” he said. “What happens at the end is execution.”

from:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/27/rodney-berget-roger-berget-death-row_n_1549277.html

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Rodney Berget

9            2         2

 

his primary challenge (RB) and how he loses his heart’s desire (RT) both = 92 = Prosecution.

 

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