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Posts Tagged ‘Chen Guangcheng’

14 June 2012              22:08 ET

City officials in China have apologised to a woman who was forced to have an abortion and suspended three people responsible, state media reports.

This came after photos showing a foetus and the mother, Feng Jiamei, shocked web users.

She was made to undergo the procedure in Shaanxi province in the seventh month of pregnancy, local officials said after investigating.

Chinese law clearly prohibits abortions beyond six months.

The Ankang city government said it decided to suspend three officials in Zhenping county following initial investigations. It also urged the county government to conduct a thorough review of its family planning operations, said Xinhua news.

On Thursday night, the city officials apologised to Ms Feng, 27, and her family, the report said.

She was ”forced to terminate her pregnancy” at a hospital in Zhenping on 2 June, said Xinhua.

Officials in Zhenping county claimed she agreed to the abortion because she was not allowed to have a second child by law. She already has a daughter, born in 2007.

But activists said she was forced into the abortion as she could not pay the fine for having a second child.

‘Violence against women’

Rights groups say China’s one-child policy has meant women being coerced into abortions, which Beijing denies.

“Feng Jianmei’s story demonstrates how the One-Child Policy continues to sanction violence against women every day,” said Chai Ling of the US-based activist group All Girls Allowed.

The group says it spoke to Ms Feng and her husband Deng Jiyuan after the incident. Mr Deng said his wife had been forcibly taken to hospital and restrained before the procedure.

The BBC’s Jon Sudworth in Shanghai says such allegations are nothing new in China, but what has made this one different is a widely circulated photo of the woman lying next to the baby’s corpse.

Media reports from China says Ms Feng has been traumatised by what has happened.

The photos sparked outrage among Internet users.

“This is what they say the Japanese devils and Nazis did. But it’s happening in reality and it is by no means the only case… They [the officials] should be executed,” one reader on news website netease.com said, according to the AFP news agency.

Activist Chen Guangcheng, who was put under virtual house arrest for campaigning against forced abortions, fled China to the US last month.

from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-18453995

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Feng Jiamei

6557 191459               52

 

her path of destiny = 52 = Criticism.  Hell hath no fury like woman done wrong.

 

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

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learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

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Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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PHOTO: Activist Chen Guangcheng, is seen in a village in China in this undated photo released by Guangcheng supporters.

May 19, 2012

Blind dissident Chen Guangcheng and his immediate family have left China on a flight to the United States. They are expected to arrive in Newark, N.J., Saturday evening.

State Dept Spokeswoman Victoria Nuland confirmed that Chen and his family left China so he can pursue studies at an American university.

“We are looking forward to his arrival in the United States later today. We also express our appreciation for the manner in which we were able to resolve this matter and to support Mr. Chen’s desire to study in the U.S. and pursue his goals,” Nuland said.

Their departure caps off three weeks of roller coaster diplomacy that reached the very highest levels of Chinese government and the White House.

The human rights activist is best known for his fight against forced abortions and sterilisations under the One Child Policy.

He served a four year prison sentence for what are widely believed to have been trumped up charges before being placed under a brutal, extra-judicial house arrest in his hometown province of Shandong.

Several media outlets, as well as human rights supporters in the U.S., cited late May as a potential departure date if all rules for passport applications were strictly adhered to.

But on Saturday, social media reports surfaced that said Chen had left the hospital. By midday, Chen spoke to the AFP and the Associated Press to say he was at the airport with his family and while he had no details, he believed they would be leaving that day.

His departure is in some ways bittersweet. His supporters by and large agree the only way he will be truly safe is outside China.

But for Chen, and dissidents before him, leaving is a compromise; he may be safer but he is also farther away from his cause.

Daring Escape Attempt

On April 22, Chen made a daring and highly risky escape with the assistance of his wife.

After several days in hiding, after a car chase and near arrest by Beijing authorities, he sought refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing on Friday, April 27.

U. S. Officials were then tasked with an unusual request from a known dissident in any country: Chen wanted to remain in China with guarantees of safety and the freedom to continue his work.

Unlike the more straightforward process of securing asylum, U.S. officials embarked on an effort to strike an unprecedented deal with the Chinese that would satisfy all sides.

Soon after Secretary of State Hilary Clinton arrived in Beijing to attend a previously scheduled economic conference, the US announced a deal. The plan was for Chen to be released to a local hospital and, after receiving medical treatment, move to Tianjin, a city just outside Beijing where he would be able to pursue his legal studies. According to the US, the Chinese agreed to offer assurances of Chen’s safety as well as investigate the past abuses committed against him.

Chen entered the hospital on Wednesday May 2. But within hours he changed his mind and the deal fell apart.

In numerous interviews over the phone with various media outlets, and in reports published online by his supporters, Chen said that he had misjudged the reality of living freely under Chinese rule.

He said he no longer felt that the safety of him or his family could ever be truly guaranteed. For that reason he wanted to leave China.

That sent U.S. officials into a tense period of re-negotiation while garnering international criticism for mishandling the case.

All the while, Secretary Clinton was in Beijing attending meetings with Chinese officials and participating in negotiations on Chen’s future behind the scenes.

The drama reached a high point when Chen made a public plea to be allowed to fly on Secretary Clinton’s plane when she left China. He also phoned into Washington to offer congressional testimony on his plight.

from:  http://abcnews.go.com/International/chen-guangcheng-chinese-dissident-leaves-us/story?id=16384545#.T7fysEVSQ3M

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Chen Guangcheng was born on November 12th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Guangcheng

November 12th

11 + 12 +2+0+1+1 = 27 = his personal year (from November 12th, 2011 to November 11th, 2012) = Taking the initiative and following through.

Ace of Wands Tarot card

27 year + 5 (May) = 32 = his personal month (from May 12th, 2012 to June 11th, 2012) = Fighting.  Winning.  United States.  America.  Americans.

Six of Wands Tarot card

32 month + 19 (19th of the month on Saturday May 19th, 2012) = 51 = his personal day = Government.  It’s official.  Lawyer.  Obeying the rules.

King of Swords Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

discover some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

Sex Numerology available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

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Chen china

May 4, 2012         6:39 am

The State Department said Friday that it expects China to quickly provide travel documents to blind human rights activist Chen Guangcheng, easing a weeklong crisis between Beijing and Washington over the fate of the long-imprisoned lawyer.

Victoria Nuland, the chief State Department spokeswoman, said in a statement that China has signaled that it will approve Chen’s application to travel to the United States with his family so that he can accept a temporary fellowship at a university and receive medical treatment.

“The Chinese government has indicated that it will accept Mr. Chen’s application for appropriate travel documents. The United States government expects that the Chinese government will expeditiously process his application for these documents, and make accommodations for his current medical condition,” Nuland said in the statement. She said the U.S. government would give “priority attention” to visa requests for Chen and his family.

Chen, held for months under house arrest in his rural hometown, set off an international diplomatic crisis last month by escaping and seeking refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. He appeared to accept a U.S.-negotiated deal to remain in China on Wednesday, repudiated it hours later, and then appeared to reverse himself again on Thursday.

He told a congressional panel in a phone call Thursday afternoon that he wanted to travel to the United States for only several months, and then return to China, a compromise that appears to have the blessing of Chinese officials. Yet activists and experts caution that it remains to be seen whether China will follow through on its promises to the United States to allow Chen freedom to pursue his studies and continue his political activism.

Nuland’s statement didn’t say which university Chen planned to work with. But Jerome Cohen, a law school professor at New York University, said Thursday that his school would offer Chen a role if he were able to make it to the United States.

The U.S. statement was another sign of the Obama administration’s eagerness to wrap up an impasse that has strained relations with China at a moment when both countries are coming through political transitions. Many Chinese officials have been upset by what they see as U.S. meddling, and Republicans and human rights advocates have criticized the administration for what they see as its heavy-handed diplomacy.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner wrapped up two days of high-level talks in Beijing on Friday. Though U.S. and Chinese officials made clear in the talks that they weren’t happy with the way the other country was handling the Chen affair, Clinton said afterward that officials had made progress in the economic and strategic discussions.

from:  http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/world_now/2012/05/chen-guangcheng-china-us-possible-breakthrough.html

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Chen Guangcheng was born on November 12th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Guangcheng

November 12th, 1971

November 12th

11 + 12 +2+0+1+1 = 27 = his personal year (from November 12th, 2011 to November 11th, 2012) = Uncharacteristic.  Out of character.

Ace of Wands Tarot card

27 year + 4 (April) = 31 = his personal month (from April 12th, 2012 to May 11th, 2012) = Controversy.  Struggle.

Five of Wands Tarot card

31 month + 4 (4th of the month on Friday May 4th, 2012) = 35 = his personal day = A real lifesaver.

Nine of Wands Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

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——————————————————————

you can try to figure out some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

Read Full Post »

File:Zhou Yongkang.png

April 29, 2012

The blind lawyer Chen Guangcheng climbed over the back wall of his home April 22 — andvescaped nearly six years of torture, malnutrition and isolation. During his detention, Chen became a global star, his dark glasses emblematic of the embattled movement of human rights defenders in China. Chen is my hero and friend. He is under the protection of the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. His status and safety present a pivotal test for freedom in China and for U.S. credibility as a defender of freedom.

Chen’s escape was planned carefully for many months. The actor Christian Bale was the most prominent person who tried to visit Chen during his years of house detention, but hundreds of Chinese citizens sought a similar audience and were forcibly turned away by police. Chen’s most passionate supporters were the Chinese netizen community. One netizen, He “Pearl” Peirong, provided logistic support for Chen’s escape, picking him up in Shandong province — where Chen and I both hail from — and taking him to Beijing.

I am awed by the courage of those who helped Chen escape. Pearl told me she is willing to die with Chen because he is such a “pure-hearted courageous person.” I was talking to her last week when she said “guo bao lai le,” that state security had arrived. Now, she is under arrest at an undisclosed location, and her blog has been erased.

Chen is often described as a “dissident,” but that is a misnomer. Despite years of brutal treatment for seeking to bring attention to those victimized by China’s “one-child” policy, he has never established a political party or organization. He has never advocated overthrowing the Communist Party. In the video he posted online after his escape, he says that the injustices his family experienced “hurt the image of our Party.” And the first thing he told me after escaping was that he wanted the outside the world to know that he was not going to leave China but to “fight to the end for the freedom of my family. . . . I want to live a normal life as a Chinese citizen with my family.”

Chen’s escape prompted a predictable brutal response. After police in Shandong realized — four days after Chen got away — that he was gone, they took Chen’s older brother and his nephew, Chen Guangfu and Chen Kegui, into custody. Media reports indicate that Chen’s mother, wife and 6-year-old daughter are tightly guarded by Chinese security forces.

This is a pivotal moment for U.S. human rights diplomacy. The United States must stand firmly with this broadly popular individual or risk losing credibility as a defender of freedom and the rule of law. There is a reason Chinese dissidents revere this country. President Obama promised in his inauguration address: “to those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.”

This blind lawyer, whose first name, “Guang Cheng,” means “light” and “integrity,” has been silenced for almost six years because the Chinese government views his assistance to the vulnerable as a threat. Chen’s desire for justice and freedom should put him firmly on the “right side” of history.

By extending the United States’s hand to Chen, the Obama administration can help the dictators of Beijing unclench their fist. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has spoken out for Chen in the past and advocated his release. Her visit to Beijing this week is a chance to connect words and deeds. I hope that Clinton will press China to guarantee the safety of Chen and his family.

China’s future will be built by those who act with Chen’s integrity and seek the light of justice, equality and freedom for all Chinese citizens. China will move toward the “right side of history” only when it recognizes that people like Chen are its strength, not its enemy.

from:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/saving-chen-guangcheng/2012/04/29/gIQAHUwtpT_story.html

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Zhou Yongkang

8863 76572157              65

 

his path of destiny = 65 = Worldly power.  Calling the shots.

King of Pentacles Tarot card

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comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

you can try to figure out some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

Sex Numerology is available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »

April 27, 2012         1255 GMT

A prominent Chinese human rights activist has called for an investigation into corrupt and cruel officials after he escaped from house arrest in an eastern province and fled to Beijing.

Chen Guangcheng addressed the Chinese premier, Wen Jiabao, in a video posted on YouTube on Friday, detailing the abuses he said he and his family had suffered at the hands of the authorities during more than 18 months of heavily guarded detention in their home.

“They broke into my house and more than a dozen men assaulted my wife,” he said. “They pinned her down and wrapped her in a comforter, beating and kicking her for hours. They also similarly violently assaulted me.”

Chinese authorities have not commented.

The activist, who is blind, was driven to Beijing on Sunday after evading his guards in the tiny village of Dongshigu in Shandong Province, said He Peirong, a friend and fellow activist said Friday.

His high-profile breakout appears to have angered the local authorities who were holding him captive, with members of his family already reporting that they have suffered reprisals.

Chen, 40, is a self-taught lawyer who rose to fame in the late 1990s thanks to his legal advocacy for what he called victims of abusive practices, such as alleged forced abortions, by China’s family-planning officials. He had been confined to his home along with his wife, mother and daughter since he was released from years in prison in September 2010.

In the video posted Friday, he said the treatment of him and his family by the local security forces “was so cruel it has greatly harmed the image of the Communist Party.”

Calling on Wen to investigate his case, he asked: “Is it just local officials flagrantly violating the law or do they have the support of the central government? I hope you will give the public a clear answer in the near future.”

The blind activist had prepared for his escape for months, He Peirong said, by lying in bed for prolonged periods so that the guards wouldn’t be suspicious if they didn’t see any activity from him for a long time.

Once free, Chen contacted He Peirong and a few other activists.

“We learned that he had escaped and needed our help,” she said, in an interview via Skype from her home city of Nanjing.

They met him at a rendezvous point, and then drove him to Beijing and hid him in a safe house, He Peirong said.

She said that Chen’s fellow activists had decided to publicize his flight from captivity after hearing that Shandong authorities, upon discovering his disappearance, had sent people to assault members of his family.

Chen Kegui, the blind activist’s nephew, said in a phone conversation with a Chinese activist that local officials broke into his family’s home. He said he used kitchen knives to defend himself when the officials tried to arrest him.

“I was afraid they might knock me down unconscious or beat me to death, so I went out to find somewhere safe,” the nephew said in the conversation, a recording of which was posted online. He added that he had since called the police and was waiting for them to come and pick him up.

Repeated attempts to reach Chen Kegui by phone were unsuccessful.

The blind activist expressed concern in the video Friday about his family’s welfare.

“Although I’m free, my worries are only deepening,” he said. “My wife, mother and children are still in their evil hands. They have been persecuting my family for a long time and my escape would only prompt them into a mode of revenge.”

Repeated calls seeking comment from the local authorities in Shandong rang unanswered.

The whereabouts of Chen’s wife, mother and daughter — who did not escape with him — remained unknown Friday.

Chen is relatively weak physically but his spirits are high, said He Peirong. There have been concerns about Chen’s health during his more than 18 months under house arrest, surrounded by a heavy police presence.

“He said he wants to live freely in his own country,” He Peirong said. “He said he hopes to hold my hand and take me to his village one day.”

The authorities reaction to Chen’s escape appeared to have ensnared He Peirong, too, after she spoke to CNN and other news media organizations Friday to publicize the situation.

Bob Fu, the head of the U.S.-based nonprofit group ChinaAid, said that he was communicating with He Peirong via Skype when she said that state security agents had arrived at her home. Attempts to contact her since then have been unsuccessful.

She had acknowledged that by speaking out about Chen’s escape, she was putting herself at risk.

“I’m not concerned about my own safety,” she said during the Skype interview. “I hope they’ll arrest me, not my friends.”

Chen’s period of home detention came after his time in jail. A local court had sentenced him to four years in prison for damaging property and disrupting traffic in a protest. His supporters maintain authorities used trumped-up charges to silence him.

Last year, in a video smuggled out of the country by a U.S.-based human rights group, Chen described his dire conditions of being a prisoner in his own home.

“Those people stand at the four corners of my house, spy on my family and monitor what we do,” he said. “They installed floodlights and surveillance cameras around my house.”

Sympathizers and journalists were prevented from visiting him, including the Hollywood actor Christian Bale, who was roughed up by security guards during an attempt to see Chen in December.

Chen’s incarceration and allegations of abuse by local officials have drawn international criticism from the likes of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Gary Locke, the U.S. ambassador to China.

Women’s Rights Without Frontiers, a U.S.-based nongovernmental organization that has been advocating Chen’s release, urged Clinton to raise the case when she visits Beijing next month.

“We are grateful that Chen is no longer under house arrest, but we are concerned about his safety and that of his family,” Reggie Littlejohn, the organization’s president, said in a statement.

“We call upon the entire international diplomatic community to make urgent, official interventions on behalf of Chen with the Chinese government,” Littlejohn said.

from:  http://edition.cnn.com/2012/04/27/world/asia/china-activist-escape/?hpt=hp_t2

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Chen Guangcheng was born on November 12th, 1971 according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chen_Guangcheng

November 12th, 1971

11 + 12 +1+9+7+1 = 41 = his life lesson = Things get ugly.

Ace of Cups Tarot card

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November 12th, 1971

November 12th

11 + 12 +2+0+1+1 = 27 = his personal year (from November 12th, 2011 to November 11th, 2012) = Uncharacteristsic.  Acting out of character.

Ace of Wands Tarot card

27 year + 4 (April) = 31 = his personal month (from April 12th, 2012 to May 11th, 2012) = Controversy.  Things get out of hand.

Five of Wands Tarot card

31 month + 27 (27th of the month on Friday April 27th, 2012) = 58 = his personal day = Safe haven.  Safe house.

Four of Swords Tarot card

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using the number/letter grid:

 
1      2      3       4       5       6      7      8      9
A      B     C       D       E       F      G      H      I
J      K      L      M      N       O      P      Q      R
S      T      U      V      W      X      Y      Z

Where:

A = 1              J = 1              S = 1

B = 2              K = 2             T = 2

C = 3              L = 3             U = 3

D = 4              M = 4            V = 4

E = 5              N = 5            W = 5

F = 6              O = 6             X = 6

G = 7              P = 7             Y = 7

H = 8              Q = 8             Z = 8

I = 9               R = 9

 

 

Chen Guangcheng

3855 7315738557             72

 

his path of destiny = 72 =

“In command.  Holding tight.

Doing what he feels is right.”

Four of Pentacles Tarot card

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—————————————————————————————–

comprehensive summary and list of predictions for 2012:

http://predictionsyear2012.com/

—————————————————————–

—————————————————————–

——————————————————————

you can try to figure out some of your own numerology for FREE at:

http://numerologybasics.com/

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

learn numerology from numerologist to the world, Ed Peterson:

https://www.createspace.com/3411561

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

—————————————————————————————–

Sex Numerology is available at:

https://www.createspace.com/3802937

Read Full Post »